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20,000,000,000 habitable planets in the galaxy - So where is everyone?

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by NeilFawcett, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. coopsjc21

    Gangster

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    Location: Kent

    In London.
     
  2. Rroff

    Man of Honour

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    There seems to be some really weird scales in relation to the max resolution they have captured of various objects.

    i.e. max resolution on objects in the galaxy is almost identical sometimes despite one of them being sometimes 50,000x further away or more.

    We have images of objects that are well into the bns of ly away that have well over double the resolution of objects that are mere 10s of ly away - granted some of this is due to things like clever tricks with gravitational lensing and/or closer stuff being hard to get images of due to interstitial dust, etc. but overall they seem to be able to get a little too much detail on really distant objects compared to closer ones.
     
  3. Eurofighter

    Wise Guy

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    It's a big Universe. There is intelligent life out there but they haven't been to the Earth.
     
  4. B&W

    Soldato

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  5. Rroff

    Man of Honour

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    I would have thought given the general nature of that direction of space, proximity and angle of various pulsars it would be highly possible it was a one off reflection of a pulsar.

    Its a general direction I wouldn't be totally surprised if we found other life from though.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2014
  6. B&W

    Soldato

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    The founder of the signal did a thorough review of it a few years back and he did rule out most "natural" explanations.

    The only thing left is...

    But yeah it could be anything.

    Here's another interesting one:

    http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/forum_thread.php?id=74524
    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1211.6470.pdf

    Can't wait till technology improves so we can do an intelligent SETI against potentially habitable systems or constant 24/7/365 scans of old signals.
     
  7. Zethor

    Mobster

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    After 4.5 billion years of existance (~1/3 of the Universe's age) our planet has produced just one form of life which has evolved in countless species, only one of which was capable of sending weak, sluggish signals that have yet to even leave our stellar neighbourhood.

    Life is therefore extremely rare or it would have appeared and evolved more than one time on our planet. Intelligence is also extremely rare or it would have evolved more than once.

    Considering these facts, searching for signals is probably a waste of time. I reckon that, if we ever find something, we'll find cousins, not too far from our planet.
     
  8. NeilFawcett

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    How do you know that it hasn't appeared more than once, and simply the more advance life (being more advanced) hasn't "beaten" it into extinction?

    If we find life elsewhere in our solar system how does that affect your comment?
     
  9. Zethor

    Mobster

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    Advanced life (I assume you mean complex) does not beat simpler life, which is why we have observed everything from algae, plants and bacteria to invertebrates and vertebrates living today or 100 million years ago. Species compete and "beat" each other but life, as a whole, goes on. There is no reason why another form of life, with a completely different genetic make up, would fail to adapt to certain ecological niches and continue to exist.

    If we find life in our solar system, it's likely it will share some of our DNA as the absence of other forms of life on our planet points toward the possibility that it's not a suitable place for life to start. And if we find multiple unrelated forms of life in that location, it will probably be the point of origin.

    Besides, my conclusion is simply Occam's razor applied to what we know - there was a common ancestor and its evolution lead to only one highly intelligent species.
     
  10. anthony566

    Wise Guy

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    There MUST be some else out there !!!
     
  11. phill1978

    Wise Guy

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    Pedo bear, he is watching you from the bushes
     
  12. Allnamestaken

    Mobster

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    Hey Kedge,

    How did water evolve?
     
  13. Tefal

    Capo Crimine

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    tell that to smallpox.
     
  14. mattyg

    Soldato

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    Sometimes I look at the human race and doubt there is ANY intelligent life anywhere.
     
  15. Spook187

    Sgarrista

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    Location: Cumbria

    Why do you say this, we have many intelligent humans on this planet, it's money/greed/power/politics/war/religion that spoil the world we live in, until this changes we will move ever so slowly in reaching to our goals.

    I honestly could not give a monkeys about these deluded idiots who bang on about God saying he created all of this, they don't have a shred of evidence to support these claims its just ridiculous, many sit on the fence just waiting to hop on to what bang wagon they can, you will be waiting a rather long time i think, so put your mind to work and really think about it.
     
  16. Rroff

    Man of Honour

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    The human race is certainly not overly marked by intelligence (see Sagan's comments on an organism at war with itself).
     
  17. kedge

    Mobster

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    It didn't evolve :D
     
  18. porushinobu

    Mobster

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    Location: Inverness,

    We really have no idea how many of these suns are still burning many are a fair distance away (several hundred lightyears +) by the time we found out it was gone the information would be 100s if not 1000s of years old.

    Then there's the fact as other have mentioned that we could be the most evolved species in our galaxy or just our little corner. Or we could be the most primitive and just can't see the ships and civilisations out there. We have barely stepped out of our solar system, which means thers is a vast amount of galaxy we really haven't seen yet, there could be an advanced civilisation on one of the nearest solar syatems but we dont know it!.

    If we are the least evolved, it's possible the other species are either: not aware of us, or are aware of us and are not interested. Then again, the many supposed UFO sightings over the years may indeed show that they exist and are interested in watching and not making contact (although I am highly skeptical that UFOs are actually extra terrestriel visits)

    all of those are human constructs and lend to our ever continuing internal conflicts. However I do think the possibility of intelligent life is out there and it could of evolved differently into a more advanced and friendly race than us barbaric humans.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2014
  19. Angilion

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    We have a pretty good idea of the life cycle of stars, certainly good enough for a timespan of thousands of years. They don't change quickly and there are large signs of the changes that do happen. So we can be almost certain that stars hundreds, thousands or even millions of light years away that we see as being on their main sequence still are.

    Continuing on from that, it's plausible that civilisations with technology much more advanced than ours would be harder to detect, not easier. We can be detected at a tiny distance by the emissions from our technology. It's plausible that more advanced technology would emit less, not more, and even a planet awash with technology would emit less than ours does and thus only be detectable at an even tinier distance.

    Or aware of us and unwilling to risk destroying our civilisation by exposing it to a far more scientifically and technologically advanced one, especially if these hypothetical people are more intelligent than us. If all of humanity's knowledge and technology is laughably obsolete and we're not intelligent enough to catch up, it probably would ruin us. What if the most intelligent humans are on a par with a young child of these people? It's possible, even likely. That's not much of a difference in intelligence and we don't know of any reason why humans are the highest possible intelligence in the universe.

    I am, too. I think that anyone with technology advanced enough to cross interstellar space easily enough for it to be practical for them to come here to watch us would have technology advanced enough for them to do it without us noticing.

    Or it might not. It could be argued that a more aggressive and unfriendly species wouldn't have been able to co-operate enough to survive, let alone develop the technology needed for interstellar travel, but even if that's true it doesn't necessarily mean they would extend that co-operation to another species of people. Even paranoid xenophobics can co-operate with each other. Seeing their entire species as "us" wouldn't preclude seeing another species as "them", so even if they had a perfectly peaceful civilisation of global co-operation they might not act the same way towards us.
     
  20. Tefal

    Capo Crimine

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    fixed