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9900K @ 5Ghz 1.2V guide Gigabyte Z390 Master

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by true_gamer, Nov 20, 2018.

  1. true_gamer

    Associate

    Joined: Feb 2, 2018

    Posts: 61

    Location: Exeter

    I feel when it comes to overclocking, people think they should increase as many settings as possible, which produces more heat from the motherboard and CPU, which is not great, especially for a 24/7 OC.

    I use an Offset and speed shift for when I don't need all the performance (Typically when web browsing, so this will also help with electricity costs, and also prolonging the life of your CPU, and your Motherboard VRMs, Phases, etc.

    So most guides will show you to use a set voltage and to turn off any power management, as well as running high currents and high load line calibrations etc.

    So by doing this, my 9900K @5Ghz would be stable at 1.26v and will hit up to 85c+ with AIDA stress test using a AIO H100i. - then the motherboard VRMS hitting high temps, and generally stressing the system.

    Now we will do the opposite here, and help keep everything cool and quiet.

    Adjust all the settings like so.

    (VAXG Phase Control only has options: Auto - High Performance - Extreme Performance.)

    [​IMG]

    Here we will set the CPU core to normal which will unlock the Dynamic Vcore setting. (Depending on your CPU, you may need to increase by +0.010v till your system is stable.

    I have mine set at 0.000v

    [​IMG]

    Set the CPU ratio to 50
    Set your Dram speeds to what your kit is, unless you know what is a stable overclock for your Dram
    Then we will head into (Advance CPU Core settings).

    [​IMG]

    Scroll down to near the bottom and enable Intel Speed Shift technology (Speedstep)

    [​IMG]

    Save and exit. Now run a stress test.

    Stable at 5Ghz with 1.2V - VRMS not peaking 40C - So we have a nice solid cool n quite overclock, which is more efficient than the stock settings with turbo.

    [​IMG]

    And when you don't need all that power, the CPU frequency and Voltage drop off.

    [​IMG]

    You're welcome. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2018
  2. benjii

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 26, 2013

    Posts: 3,287

    Location: Plymouth

    How long did you stress test for?
     
  3. true_gamer

    Associate

    Joined: Feb 2, 2018

    Posts: 61

    Location: Exeter

    It's been running stable for the past few weeks.

    This guide was just a quick mock up.
     
  4. Ghetzi

    Associate

    Joined: Feb 2, 2019

    Posts: 2

    Just found this today - this is amazing!

    I am new to OC-ing but just manually got my 9900K (on Aorus Master Z390) to 5GHz at 1.265v static with LLC on High. After one hour in AIDA64, VR VOUT sticks around 1.224v when at load and max CPU package temp is 81c.

    From my admittedly green experience, I believe this means my CPU is stable at 1.224v (the voltage after droop) and any BSOD would be due to a voltage drop somewhere below that point. If that's accurate, the next step would be to manually OC in BIOS by dropping Vcore to 1.224 and raise LLC (without going over 1.224v) to prevent droop below stability, right? Once I find stability, I can ascertain the minimum voltage required for this particular chip to run stable at 5GHz. Then I can use your method here to setup adaptive voltage so the system is stable at 5GHz but voltage drops when cores are idle, right?

    I'm sure this is basic to most here, but I'm really new and trying to figure out how to tweak the system. Before today, after reading some were having to go to 1.3v to hit 5GHz, I was kind of happy to run a stable 5Ghz at 1.265v. Love to fine tune it even more...If you see this, would you mind to verify I'm on the right track or offer redirection? Thanks!
     
  5. hlennie

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 17, 2008

    Posts: 821

    Location: Black country

    @Ghetzi On the right track. More reading and practice and you be well on your way. Event viewer is a good tool to check for problems in windows 10.

    You might want to research memory overclocking as well as gpu overclocking via msi afterburner if you have caught the overclocking bug. Lastley welcome to the forum.
     
  6. Ghetzi

    Associate

    Joined: Feb 2, 2019

    Posts: 2

    @hlennie - Thanks for the reply and welcome. Used to use afterburner, but I recently had to switch to Precision X1 for the asynchronous fan support. Regarding the CPU, I got as far as figuring out that 1.25v static was stable at 5Ghz. Have to wait until this weekend to get back to working on adaptive. Getting closer! I'm sure I'll be back for more researching and, hopefully, positive results. Thanks again!
     
  7. Parkinson1NX

    Gangster

    Joined: Oct 16, 2015

    Posts: 295

    Location: Norfolk, ENG

    Just a quick look over your images and in the BIOS you have an option for CPU upgrade? What BIOS version are you using? My z390 Master doesn't show this.
     
  8. hlennie

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 17, 2008

    Posts: 821

    Location: Black country

    My Z370 aurora gaming had this option thought it was on all the z line up by gigabyte
     
  9. orbitalwalsh

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2015

    Posts: 12,656

    @true_gamer

    nice little guide :)

    though dont worry about VRM to much on the master - can set bios to M.C.E Enabled and run AVX for 24 hours just fine without throttling :D
     
  10. Parkinson1NX

    Gangster

    Joined: Oct 16, 2015

    Posts: 295

    Location: Norfolk, ENG

    Still sat here wondering why your Master has the option for a CPU upgrade and mine doesn't. Shows different stats in AIDA64 as well.