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Adult Social Care

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by No1newts, Apr 29, 2019.

  1. Rilot

    Don

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 19,599

    Location: Wargrave, UK

    I already did. I quit my very, very well-paid job in IT consultancy in 2015 when my boy was 2 and took a job managing IT in a school. Had to buy a much smaller house and cheaper cars. We're skint most of the time but I take my son to school and pick him up and get to have breakfast and dinner with him every day.
    My wife and I had the luxury of 2 very well paid jobs and so surviving on 1 income was possible. There are many that cannot do what I did.
     
  2. Andrew_McP

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 21, 2003

    Posts: 2,561

    Location: South North West

    Yes, the inability to choose basic, but very affordable (as Council housing ought to be IMO) homes is what's throttling so much of what we might want from a decent society. Successive governments have ignored this pressure cooker and now society is starting to leak steam from all sorts of unpleasant places.

    My attitude though is that caring for the frail -- young or old -- is the new 'national service'. There is no way we can afford professional care for all those who need it, and getting folk to spend all their assets paying for their own care only seems to be enriching those at the top of the care food chain. Once that money runs out it's back to taxpayers.

    I'm at the very end of the baby boomer era (1963), with no pension, low earnings all my life (thanks partly to sheer incompetence, partly to rat race aversion), and an increasing unease about how the young v old debate is going. But I gave up work to look after my mother, who has dementia, because I have no faith that once her modest assets are gone, the Council will be able to afford to give her a decent standard of care. The longer I care, the better the chance her money won't run out when I can't cope any more. I'm managing to do it all myself so far, saving the Council four visits a day, and she's pretty healthy now I'm providing 24/7 care & nutrition. In her decline she was very costly to the health service, with mystery hospital visits and countless minor and often self-inflicted problems. If most families were still real families, this kind of thing wouldn't happen, because we'd all be part of a natural caring framework.

    I don't have a framework to keep an eye on me in my later life, so -- trying to be pragmatic -- I've already got my care needs taken care of. I just hope I don't get dementia -- like Mum and 850,000 others -- and forget the box under the bed is there when I start to lose independence. Sounds gloomy, but watching dementia at work is enough to make anyone reconsider the value of those last few years of life. The trick is knowing when you're getting there, but that's tomorrow's problem, not today's. :)

    TLDR: social care is a dream, the sooner we face up to reality and take responsibility for our own flesh and blood, the better. In the mean time, build cheap, basic pre-fab accommodation as quickly as possible to give more people more lifestyle choices more quickly. This is has been the only issue I've wanted to vote on for the last decade or more, and it's been hard to find a party taking it seriously enough.
     
  3. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 20,968

    Location: Northern England

    Awesome :)
    I still think most, if not all could do it if they were willing though. Where I would have sympathy are those earning buttons.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
  4. Semple

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 5, 2010

    Posts: 5,533

    The majority of people can't even get a mortgage on a single salary. Average UK salary is £29,000, most mortgage providers will lend you in the region of 130k-140k based on that salary.

    How far North are you?

    It's already happening. Houses in southern districts of Greater Manchester are close to what you'd be expected to pay in the south-west. You can go much further out of the city - south (60 minute drive) and start to see houses (3 bed) for about 150k.

    The northern side of Manchester is significantly cheaper, but you can clearly see the quality of living between north and south.
     
  5. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 20,968

    Location: Northern England

    @Semple 30 mins north of Newcastle
     
  6. danlightbulb

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 14, 2005

    Posts: 2,128

    this may solve the problem for one individual but it doesnt solve the problem overall. The south east still needs teachers! and still needs lots of other lower paid professions. If all these moved north, even if that was feasible which of course it isnt, what happens then?

    This is a massive circular problem with no single identifiable root. The situation we are in has evolved over decades as a result of many changing factors. Primarily though, this is rooted somewhere in the post war change to consumerism and debt fuelled economic growth, and the desires that this created in people.

    Im concerned about tax rises for adult social care. I dont even own my own home and am trying to get on the ladder right now, but yet will be expected to pitch in my taxes to subsidise people who've had it good (or their families have).
     
  7. Semple

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 5, 2010

    Posts: 5,533

    In a similar position myself.

    Personally i don't see it being fixed. As an earlier poster was making the point of, doesn't matter which political party pledges that the older generations need to be paying more for their future social care costs, the opposite party will always spin it as an attack on the elderly etc etc.

    Therefore i think it'll just be a case of carrying on as we are, those who can't afford their own social care will end up having to make do with whatever is on offer. I think enough people know by now that the way of life these days is every man for himself.
     
  8. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 20,968

    Location: Northern England

    If there's an exodus of people from the south east then property is freed up and demand drops. Ergo property prices fall to a more logical and reasonable level. What we as a country do need to stop are investors buying properties that then remain empty, but that's a different story.
     
  9. danlightbulb

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 14, 2005

    Posts: 2,128

    Agree on the investors point, but a mass exodus from the SE cant happen, there is nowhere for them to go. I live West Midlands, and the housing market here is dire too. Very little quality choice and everything half decent gets snapped up. a while back i tried looking out towards wales, where demand might be lower but to stay within reasonable commuting distance of walsall everything was still out my price range or a wreck.
     
  10. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 20,968

    Location: Northern England


    I do work alongside the local authorities up here. We have 5 years of housing stock available and are still building. I also reckon we'll see a small exodus should brexit go ahead with the associated drop in property costs. The downside is we may lose a lot of those who work in low salary industries such as care.