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Ambient temperatures

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by the-tazs, 11 Mar 2010.

  1. the-tazs

    Associate

    Joined: 13 Jan 2010

    Posts: 84

    Hi i read a thread on hear someware (can not find it know) about can a pc cooling system run below ambient temperatures,Has anyone done this?
    i just had a look at my pc temperature prob which read 22.6c(idle)and then clock my digital room temperature monitor which read 23.9c is this right?
     
  2. UnworthyBean

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 15 Jun 2009

    Posts: 2,476

    Its impossible for a standard air cooling or watercooling setup to run below ambient temperatures.

    Temperature gauges aren't 100% correct, Especially ones in a PC, They're just a guideline. Your PC will be running a little bit warmer, or the room thermometer is picking it up a little bit warmer.
     
  3. RJC

    Don

    Joined: 29 May 2005

    Posts: 28,870

    Location: Kent

    To get below ambient you will need use TEC'S or refrigeration.

    What software were you using to check temps, also is your system overclocked or running with speed step on.
     
  4. Guest2

    Capodecina

    Joined: 6 May 2009

    Posts: 17,351

    Unless you have an air-con unit blowing directly inside your pc. This would make the computer temperature cooler than the temperature at the other end of the room where there is no aircon unit
     
  5. shadowscotland

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 31 May 2006

    Posts: 7,559

    Location: West London

    PC temp probs lie (not quite true but as good as)
    They are perfect for measuring an increase or decrease in YOUR temps but that's all.

    The communities fixation with 'are my temps ok' is pointless unless an external thermometer is use.
    Can easily be plus/minus 10c differance in reported temps from the actual temp between two pc

    Is your room temp sensor, your pc?
    As 'digital room temperature monitor' is a long way to say thermometer
     
    Last edited: 11 Mar 2010
  6. the-tazs

    Associate

    Joined: 13 Jan 2010

    Posts: 84

    O.K this is my setup
    Case-- Coolermaster cosmos RC1000
    PSU--- Coolermaster Real Power M1000
    GPU--- Nvidia Geforce GTX 260
    M/B--- Asus M4A79T Deluxe
    CPU--- AMD Phemon llX4 955 BE @3.6GHZ @stock
    Ram--- Corsair Dominator 4GB
    Thermaltake 350cc reseevoir and temperature probe

    CPU cooling--- Modded Corsair H50-1 120mm rad with push/pull config fans are 2x coolermaster 120x120x25mm 1200 rpm 17dBa mounted as intake at rear,240mm all copper rad (make unknow) 2x coolermaster 120x120x25mm 1200 rpm 17dBa mounted at top of case intake,bottom fan coolermaster 120x120x25 1200 rpm 17dBa exhaust.
     
  7. Corasik

    Soldato

    Joined: 5 Jan 2003

    Posts: 5,001

    Location: West Midlands

    Firstly neither the room thermometer, nor the PC's temperature probes are likely to be "that" accurate. Secondly heat rises, so if your PC is on the floor, it could be in cooler air that the room thermometer, and if the PC's probe is right at the intake (thus not affected too much by the fact its normally several degrees higher inside the case), then it could be simply measureing the temperature of the incoming air at floor level, so a little lower is potentially possible.

    A computer case with good cooling is generally any case that can maintain an internal temperature of no more than 5 degrees above ambient, and a good CPU cooler will keep the CPU within 5 to 10 degrees of case ambient while idle... Higher is ok when the CPU is loaded up.
     
  8. the-tazs

    Associate

    Joined: 13 Jan 2010

    Posts: 84

    Ok,the pc is about 100mm off the floor for air circulation,the pc temperature probe is in a 5.25 driver bay,the temperature sensor is between the 240mm radiator and the resevoir intake. the room thermometer is ontop of the pc tower,both the room and pc thermometer have a accuracy of +/- 1c
     
  9. UKDTweak

    Soldato

    Joined: 2 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,581

    Location: N.Ireland

    Surley the temp sensor should be as close to your CPU as possible, Not the colling system?
     
  10. the-tazs

    Associate

    Joined: 13 Jan 2010

    Posts: 84

    Why put the temperature sensor between the cpu block and the first radiator? we all have temperature monitor programs to watch the temperature of the cpu,so you know roughly the temperature of your coolant out of the block. Having the temperature probe at the end of the loop would show that the placement of radiators and fans were doing the job of cooling the loop down. I E at the moment Hardware monitor is reading TMPIN0 @21c, 22.5c on all four cores and the temperature probe is reading 18.5c, so i know that the loop is working and the coolant that is being pumped back to the block is lower than the CPU
     
  11. JonJ678

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 Dec 2008

    Posts: 10,370

    Location: England

    Careful choice of which ambient can improve matters somewhat though, it it's -5 outside and 25 indoors then long pipes have definite potential. Powerful fans will do it too, on the basis that as the air accelerates it's density decreases and so it gets colder, but I suspect you know that.

    The water in your loop is all at the same temperature, to within about a degree Taz. Doesn't matter much where you put the thermometer as it's unlikely to be accurate to within a degree anyway.
     
  12. the-tazs

    Associate

    Joined: 13 Jan 2010

    Posts: 84

    How can the coolant in the loop be all the same temperature? A liquid cooling system circulates a liquid through a copper heat sink attached to the processor As the liquid passes through the copper heat sink, heat is transferred from the hot processor to the cooler liquid The hot liquid then moves out to a radiator/fan and cooled The cooled liquid then travels back through the system to the CPU to continue the process.

    A liquid-cooling system for a PC works a lot like the cooling system of a car. Both take advantage of a basic principle of thermodynamics - that heat moves from warmer objects to cooler objects. As the cooler object gets warmer, the warmer object gets cooler.
     
  13. JonJ678

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 Dec 2008

    Posts: 10,370

    Location: England

    Main reason is the flow rate.

    Specific heat capacity of water is high relative to the heat dumped into the loop so it warms up slowly. The high flow rate combined with this effect keeps the temperature quite evenly distributed. It's not that temperature distribution is completely uniform, indeed you can measure a temperature increase across a waterblock decrease across a radiator, but the magnitude of the variation is negligible.