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Another American cop thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by VincentHanna, Sep 7, 2018.

  1. Efour

    Caporegime

    Joined: Sep 8, 2005

    Posts: 25,159

    Location: Norrbotten, Sweden.

    For what it's worth, has the cop shown remorse for his/her escalation of the situation?

    Surely they are thinking they messed up too and has to live with this decision they made.

    I mean it is murder, technically? But?
    What a messed up country.
     
  2. NVP

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 6, 2007

    Posts: 6,493

    There appears to be a disproportionate amount of these incidents with non-whites. But you can't say the white killings go unreported, remember that Daniel Shaver guy in the hotel corridor?
     
  3. Angilion

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 5, 2003

    Posts: 16,616

    Location: Just to the left of my PC

    No.

    Also, I didn't say they went unreported. I said what you quoted me saying, and still do.
     
  4. Roar87

    Soldato

    Joined: May 10, 2012

    Posts: 5,758

    Location: Leeds

    There's also a disproportionate amount of crime by non-whites, so naturally there will be more interactions between Police and non-whites.
     
  5. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 44,020

    IIRC it’s in proportion to the interactions police have with black Americans, they do tend to have a higher portion of interactions as there is a higher portion of crime committed among that part of the population.
     
  6. NVP

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 6, 2007

    Posts: 6,493

    There doesn't need to be crime involved, as with this case.
     
  7. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 44,020

    Yes, interactions with police don’t necessarily mean a crime has been committed.
     
  8. =XDC=FluphyBunny

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 16, 2010

    Posts: 4,526

    Location: North East England

    Having watched the video of the latest shooting it really does look like negligent discharge. Doesn't make it any better. The US clearly has an issue with both a lack of training for their police and a rediculous number if guns on the streets resulting in a not at all surprising fear for the police of been shot on a daily basis.
     
  9. VincentHanna

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 30, 2013

    Posts: 19,705

    I looked in to it a while back. The study I recall was that they get something like 50 hours of firearms training at the academy, but only 10 hours of crisis management/de-escalation.

    And then in some states, once they are cops, they are only required to qualify once a year and that's just on a firing range.

    To be a firearms officer in the UK you go through 13 weeks of training.
     
  10. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 19,318

    Location: Solihull-Florida

    Depends of what county and state they are in.

    My niece started at the age of 15 years old. Had years of training.
    She saw\held her first dying victim just before her 16th BDay

    There are many that come out of the forces that chose the police force.
    This may cause a problem in my opinion.
     
  11. Burnsy2023

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Nov 17, 2003

    Posts: 36,350

    Location: Southampton, UK

    I must be misunderstanding. I assume you mean that your niece was an explorer or cadet at the age of 15 rather than a police officer?
     
  12. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 19,318

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    In pasco county they go with the police on traffic duty(in the car) first. Then made her way up to the police academy.
    I do know she spent 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday,How long it took I have no idea. But it was over 6 months when she was 19 yoa.


    There was an accident on HW19 and she went to help the lady.
     
  13. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 65,246

    Seen that in a few videos where the cop has a ride-along (not a delinquent which is also done in the US) and had to hold back from certain incidents due to the ride-along being a minor - I think they are OK to attend accidents but not firearms related incidents.
     
  14. =XDC=FluphyBunny

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 16, 2010

    Posts: 4,526

    Location: North East England


    Wow that level training is a joke!
     
  15. Eurofighter

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 20, 2014

    Posts: 1,447

  16. rxodium

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 26, 2019

    Posts: 203

    US Cops are just regular beat cops. Stage two of PSNI training (a completely armed UK force) takes around 11 weeks. Two of those weeks are training on using their sidearm. Three of those weeks are driver training.
     
  17. Angilion

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 5, 2003

    Posts: 16,616

    Location: Just to the left of my PC

    He told her she'd have to leave the train if she didn't take her feet of the seat (which is part of the rules of the metro, which he is required to enforce). She refused to take her feet off the seat. He took her off the train. Someone else abused the police, played the race card and spat at the police. They were arrested.

    I'm not bothered about it.
     
  18. Eurofighter

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 20, 2014

    Posts: 1,447

    Fair enough then. Didnt know that
     
  19. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 19,318

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    Florida has a 6 month training for that. So the UK cop training is worse!
    Also they practice on the gun range when ever they like. As it's legal to have a gun.

     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2019
  20. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 22,450

    I mean it's PSNI... i'm sure the rules are relaxed a tad.

    I would have tried to compare training regimens of AFOs and Florida cops, but i can't actually find a decent source on requirements (especially say annual retest requirements), there does seem to be a lack of professionalism in some places in the US for some officers to be so unable to do their job. Florida departments might set for a better standard than say Nevada departments, where as the UK is a mostly a single regimen (bar NI, which has a special circumstance).

    It could also be that the UK might not have a good regimen at all, but there's so few officers and so few events, that it's unlikely to hit the news like it does in the US (daily).
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2019