Anyone non-panic buying?

Caporegime
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With electric prices going sky high. I would have thought peasants would be opting to use less energy meaning more around for the rest of us.

I see it balancing out.

Same goes for food. If there is a real shortage the peasants will die first meaning less demand and then prices fall back to normal.

Or I'll just eat the dead peasants or at least use their bodies for more fuel for the fire.
 
Associate
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Land of Gin (I wish)
There’re people with no money management whatsoever. Served customers who I had to void off food in order to get their cigs or rolly baccy. If you think smoking is more important than food, then you shouldn’t be breeding.
 
Soldato
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So, the general consensus regarding food is that most people aren't stocking up any more than usual, which is understandable because it is unlikely there will actually be a general food shortage.

I don't believe there's a food shortage per se, but similar to the fuel crisis in that not enough delivery drivers to maintain the supply chain.

If it really came to the point where there wasn't enough food on the shelves then the government would just send a load of army HGV drivers to assist with delivering.

If we do have power cuts similar to the three day weeks that were the case in the 70s, what will happen to those who need electricity for their health? Talking dialysis machines, CPAP machines?

Really really unlikely that domestic and commercial properties will have blackouts, if we do have a shortage then heavy industry will be asked to scale back, or shutdown for short periods of time.
 
Caporegime
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There’re people with no money management whatsoever. Served customers who I had to void off food in order to get their cigs or rolly baccy. If you think smoking is more important than food, then you shouldn’t be breeding.

That's the problem when you have a society which makes it too easy for layabouts and work dodgers to thrive. I had a chat with a woman once who said she had been offered more work was like an extra few hours per week at supermarket and was wondering how it would effect her tax credits. I explained to her the system is designed that for every £1 she earns she gets something like 5p-20p taken away from her credits I think it is. So she would be 80p better off for every extra £1 she earned. She didn't seem too impressed so I extrapolated her figures over a year and done some complicated calculations involving income tax, etc and found out she would have an extra £1600 per year in her pocket. Her response: But that means I need to work for that money. Doesn't seem worth it to me. Then she wonders why she is poor. If they had to work hard for the money they would realise it's not free play money to be ****** away on ciggies.

Stay classy Britain.
 
Soldato
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Uk
That's the problem when you have a society which makes it too easy for layabouts and work dodgers to thrive. I had a chat with a woman once who said she had been offered more work was like an extra few hours per week at supermarket and was wondering how it would effect her tax credits. I explained to her the system is designed that for every £1 she earns she gets something like 5p-20p taken away from her credits I think it is. So she would be 80p better off for every extra £1 she earned. She didn't seem too impressed so I extrapolated her figures over a year and done some complicated calculations involving income tax, etc and found out she would have an extra £1600 per year in her pocket. Her response: But that means I need to work for that money. Doesn't seem worth it to me. Then she wonders why she is poor. If they had to work hard for the money they would realise it's not free play money to be ****** away on ciggies.

Stay classy Britain.
For every £1 you earn you lose 63p of universal credit so say she took on an extra 10 hours a week at £10 an hour then she would only be around £37 better off a week so would work out at just less than £4 an hour, then she might end up having to pay more council tax as her income has gone up so her council tax reduction has been cut so that 4 pound has become £3 now etc. Would you work in a supermarket for £3 an hour?
 
Caporegime
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For every £1 you earn you lose 63p of universal credit so say she took on an extra 10 hours a week at £10 an hour then she would only be around £37 better off a week so would work out at just less than £4 an hour, then she might end up having to pay more council tax as her income has gone up so her council tax reduction has been cut so that 4 pound has become £3 now etc. Would you work in a supermarket for £3 an hour?

This was before universal credit

Which is why I said tax credits.

There are different income limits for each type of tax credit. If you earn over a certain amount, you'll be paid less in tax credits; this is called 'reduction due to salary'. If you claim working tax credit, you can earn up to £6,565 a year – either from being employed or self-employed – and you can receive your maximum payment. If you earn more than this amount, you'll lose 41p of the maximum amount for every extra £1 you earn. So, if you earn £7,565 a year, you'll earn £1,000 extra, which is 41p x 1,000. This means you'll lose £410 from your maximum payment. For child tax credits, the maximum salary is £16,480. If you earn more than that, the amount of child tax credit you'll receive is reduced by 41p for every £1 you earn over this limit. So, if you earn £20,000, you'll earn £3,520 over the threshold (£3,520 x 41p is £1,443.20), which is how much child tax credit you'd lose per year. If you receive both working tax credit and child tax credit, and these deductions apply to you, the maximum amount of each element you receive will be reduced in the following order: working tax credit, excluding any childcare element the childcare element of working tax credit the child elements of child tax credit the family element of child tax credit.

Read more: https://www.which.co.uk/money/tax/t...its/how-to-calculate-tax-credits-a17uj7g88zw6 - Which?

There was a 16 hour and a 30 hour working week limit and if you hit the 30 hour per week you got more. She was on like 22-26 hours iirc and was being offered the difference to hit the 30 hour mark which would have actually seen her far better off as the reduction to tax credits was pretty much pennies.
 
Soldato
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2,925
There’re people with no money management whatsoever. Served customers who I had to void off food in order to get their cigs or rolly baccy. If you think smoking is more important than food, then you shouldn’t be breeding.

This.

Watched something on the news the other day about some Labour politician saying that the £20 a week UC cut (It isn't a cut, as it was always signaled as a temporary increase) wouldn't only affect the claimant, but it would also affect the local cafes and restaurants in the local economy where that money could be being spent.

I almost fell off my chair.

I know UC is a paltry amount and I have thankfully never been in the position that I have ever had to claim any benefits even when I was out of work for a brief period of time, but I am sensible enough to know that if I ever am in that position that my spending would be essential ONLY. Meaning energy, rent, council tax, food - And that would be from the cheapest supermarket. Not spent dining out in cafes. The state isn't there to provide a lifestyle to people. It is meant to be a safety net.

Unfortunately the vast majority of people seem to think otherwise these days.
 
Soldato
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2 Jan 2005
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leeds
People say I’ll be fine as got GCH. Do they realise that the pumps use electricity to work?

People need to buy thick jumpers - at least a size larger than they normally buy so to accommodate layers.

The property that my ex and I rented had awful inefficient storage heaters, which we couldn’t change the time when the heat came out. Plus all but two windows were single glazed So woke up roasting and came back from work shivering. When our leccy bill came - it was £420 for the autumn quarter (2003) and we said sod this. Switched off the heaters. We went to Leeds market and got thick jumpers, fleece trousers, vests and slipper socks (ones with the grips). Bought 3 sets each so one on, one in the wash/drying and one in the drawers.

Had loads of cups of tea and coffee. The next bill came and it was half.

i live in leeds and can confirm this is quality advice
 
Soldato
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Georgia, USA
Some very short sighted people here. Being prepared is not hording its an insurance against things going wrong that are out of your control.
The first winter after I bought my house we had a huge storm and we lost power for 2 weeks. This was when the temps were in the -10 to minus -20 range. After we got through that I had a wood stove installed and discovered prepping. All the crap that went on with covid didn't affect us because we were prepared and didn't have to rush out and panic buy.

We have it easy living in the western countries, but if you think it can't possibly go bad very quickly your in for a shock.
 
Soldato
Joined
28 Nov 2003
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7,100
Location
Shropshire
Those are just normal Costco items in some of the trollies, hardly piled high panic buying. DM rag strikes again.


People still haven't realised the Daily Mail, now Paul Dacre is no longer editor, is no longer a strongly right wing supportive newspaper...

There are many subtle (and not so subtle) anti Tory articles in it nowadays. But if people shun reading it they will remain entrenched in incorrect historic views. I reluctantly still read The Guardian and The Times and the Daily Mirror, it's always best to know what one's "enemies" latest propaganda is ;)
 
Associate
Joined
18 Jul 2021
Posts
1,211
Location
Land of Gin (I wish)
This.

Watched something on the news the other day about some Labour politician saying that the £20 a week UC cut (It isn't a cut, as it was always signaled as a temporary increase) wouldn't only affect the claimant, but it would also affect the local cafes and restaurants in the local economy where that money could be being spent.

I almost fell off my chair.

I know UC is a paltry amount and I have thankfully never been in the position that I have ever had to claim any benefits even when I was out of work for a brief period of time, but I am sensible enough to know that if I ever am in that position that my spending would be essential ONLY. Meaning energy, rent, council tax, food - And that would be from the cheapest supermarket. Not spent dining out in cafes. The state isn't there to provide a lifestyle to people. It is meant to be a safety net.

Unfortunately the vast majority of people seem to think otherwise these days.
There’s a small row of council houses at the top of my colleague’s road. Whenever she and husband goes home, they drive past these houses, there’s always a takeaway driver at one of the doors (not always the same). Then the front of the houses has takeaway trays and boxes with loads of food in them. Clearly shows these layabouts receive too much money as can afford takeaways each day. Rats have come due to the food.

Colleague and a few others complained about the rats, smell and rubbish. All the five families have got warnings for this. Plus rubbish was cleared
 
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