Apple to replace Intel and move to ARM - *** Confirmed as "Apple Silicon" ***

Caporegime
Joined
20 Sep 2006
Posts
27,969
As per my reply to the other poster worrying, I don't see any reason why you would. Keep it and enjoy it for years to come.
 
Associate
Joined
20 Sep 2003
Posts
2,354
Location
Scotland
I know its just annoying that pretty much as soon as I buy it=, it then becomes near obsolete, typical, after nearly 6 years without upgrading. But then my other machine totally fked although my old man did manage to get it to power back up and works using HDMI out. As for the spec I got a the extra ram and gfx so as the machine would last me longer and be a bit more future proof. I do plan on getting into music production though and the odd bit of video production.
 
Soldato
Joined
6 Oct 2009
Posts
2,970
So after just taking delivery of a brand new Intel 16" Core i9 with 32Gb ram and an AMD 5500M 8Gb I am starting to wonder if I should be returning it. I bought it as a managed to wreck my 2014 MBP with a liquid spill hence the need to buy this machine I am typing on (and loving) right now. I have until the 3rd July to fill in the returns form and take things from there but I really do not know what to do, I just laid out £3300 for this machine and was hoping it would see me through the next 4 to 5 years but now I am starting to wonder. Arrrrggghh!

There's absolutely no reason for concern.

The Mac install base is about 125 million. Apple sells about 20 million macs per year, and Apple will continue to sell Intel macs for the next 2 years. Even after a year of full ARM mac sales, they'll only be about 10% of the install base. After 5 years they will be about 50%. It would absolutely see you through to the next 4-5 years.
 
Associate
Joined
20 Sep 2003
Posts
2,354
Location
Scotland
There's absolutely no reason for concern.

The Mac install base is about 125 million. Apple sells about 20 million macs per year, and Apple will continue to sell Intel macs for the next 2 years. Even after a year of full ARM mac sales, they'll only be about 10% of the install base. After 5 years they will be about 50%. It would absolutely see you through to the next 4-5 years.

Thanks for the reassurance, I have literally just this second installed Bootcamp on my MBP!....... wanted to test out some gaming for the fist time in years and will be needed for my new job.
 
Caporegime
Joined
20 Sep 2006
Posts
27,969
Thanks for the reassurance, I have literally just this second installed Bootcamp on my MBP!....... wanted to test out some gaming for the fist time in years and will be needed for my new job.
It's not going to be great to be honest, it'll get very warm!
 
Soldato
Joined
15 May 2007
Posts
12,804
Location
Ipswich / Bodham
I know its just annoying that pretty much as soon as I buy it=, it then becomes near obsolete

lol, 'near obsolete'!

You're probably in the sweet spot. You've got high end performance that'll last well until the new ARM machines are fully bedded in, creases ironed out and performance understood and quantified. I'm in the same boat with an i9 iMac. Ignore the FOMO - the ARM machines aren't even released yet. You've got the best tool for the job, and by the time the next best tool comes around, you'll be ready to change.
 

LiE

LiE

Soldato
Joined
2 Aug 2005
Posts
23,322
Location
Milton Keynes
ARM aren't going to in the Pro models until the very end.

Exactly. I can see them coming in to replace the Macbook Air first at the end of the year, then potentially when we have a redesigned iMac then we will see it there.

I'm most interested in a very thin and light laptop that runs cool, quiet and has grunt.
 
Soldato
Joined
9 Mar 2003
Posts
10,585
I’m not sure I agree, I think they’ll want to enter with a big bang and a decent performance jump.

The A12Z is already at least as fast as Air (if benchmarks are to be believed) and there is not that much of a gap between the Air, A12Z and 13” pro.

If they replace the air first, they could just kill their 13” MBP sales and the MBP is priced considerably higher.
 

LiE

LiE

Soldato
Joined
2 Aug 2005
Posts
23,322
Location
Milton Keynes
Whatever happens it will shake up their current line up. They may potentially drop certain models. As soon as ARM is available to buy, I cannot see anyone buying intel based Macs.

Maybe they will go with the MBA with a slower variant and a MBP variant that is their flag ship chip.

Certainly the MBA is an obvious candidate, it will really benefit from the speed bump and cooler chips.
 
Soldato
Joined
6 Oct 2009
Posts
2,970
True but the i5 CPU in it is quite underpowered IMO.

Not every "Pro" prioritises raw performance. There isn't only one type of "Pro" needing one type of product that prioritises one specific thing.

Anyway, "Pro" is a name and just a branding in every single product in the entire world that uses a variant of that name. It's meaningless from a tech perspective. It always has been, it always will be.
 
Soldato
Joined
6 Oct 2009
Posts
2,970
Sure there are exceptions, but I'd say the majority of pro workflows benefit from more speed.

Well if you define a "Pro workflow" as one that requires a lot of raw performance, then it's pretty obvious that majority of "Pro workflows" (based on that definition), will require a lot of raw performance.

Dell Precision laptops also use Core i5 CPUs in their entry level models.
 
Associate
Joined
3 Sep 2012
Posts
114
Gutting to have a fairly new laptop that is going to be obsolete soon with an abhorrent keyboard. Was looking at selling it soon to get max value so I can just get one with a better keyboard, but really not looking worth it now.
 
Associate
Joined
3 Sep 2012
Posts
114
Huh, what planet are you on?

The one with butterfly key switches and progressively less support for industry standard software over the next few years. Had my old laptop for about 8, don't expect to have this one for as long given the circumstances.
 
Top