Poll: Austrian Grand Prix 2022, Red Bull Ring - Race 11 (Sprint Race Weekend)

Rate the Austrian Grand Prix out of ten


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Soldato
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Spielberg

When was the track built?

The fearsome, original Osterreichring was originated in 1969 as a replacement for the Zeltweg airfield circuit. The track known today as the Red Bull Ring was more or less created over the winter of 1995-6, when Hermann Tilke was engaged to turn the Osterreichring into a shorter, more modern race track.

When was its first Grand Prix?
The A1-Ring, as it was then called, was opened in 1996, with Formula 1 arriving at the circuit a year later. Jacques Villeneuve won the race, while Jean Alesi had a spectacular crash when his Benetton climbed up the Ferrari of Eddie Irvine. Alesi’s team mate Gerhard Berger, meanwhile, used his home Grand Prix to announce his F1 retirement.

What’s the circuit like?
It’s only wee, bless it, but the Red Bull Ring packs a lot into a short lap. The first half rewards power, as the cars blast along three straights separated by a pair of uphill right-handers. But then as the drivers work their way downhill, the circuit becomes a regular toboggan ride, as the cars canyon through a series of quick corners, including the exhilarating Rindt right-hander, named for Austria’s first F1 champion.

Why go?
Race tracks don’t come much more picturesque than the Red Bull Ring, set in an idyllic natural bowl in the Styrian mountains. That makes for a pleasant environment for a Grand Prix, while if you’re after tourist attractions to visit after the race, look no further than the museum in Graz dedicated to the city’s favourite son: Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Where is the best place to watch?
One of Formula 1’s best views is to be had at the Red Bull Ring’s ‘Nord’ grandstand, based around the outside of what used to be the Bosch Kurve at the Osterreichring. Here, you’ll have a great vantage point across much of the track as it drops away from you down the natural slope of the circuit.

Weekend Schedule

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TV Schedules

Sky F1

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Channel 4

Austrian Grand Prix Qualifying Highlights
- Saturday 9th July - TBC Channel 4

Austrian Grand Prix Race Highlights - Sunday 10th July - TBC Channel 4



Track Information

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Weather Forecast (as of Tuesday 5th July 2022)

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Soldato
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Gotta love double headers :D Thanks for the thread chrismscotland

Is that rain forecast for Friday? On a sprint weekend? Interesting...
 
Soldato
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It'll be interesting if the Mercs (or anyone else for that matter) can get a decent quali and throw the cat amongst the pigeons for the sprint. Drive like there's nothing to lose etc. Now us Merc fans are on the other side of the coin, it'd be amusing. Other than that, sprints are **** and a waste of time etc. :p
 
Soldato
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Thanks for the thread @chrismscotland.

Not sure about always. Since it's been back Mercedes won 5 times and RB 3 times (6-4 if including Styrian GPs).

Yeah, last year having two races here when the RBR was so ridiculously dominant somewhat skews the perception of the track. I hope we don't see the same thing again this weekend.

I've seen rumours that RBR and Ferrari might be in trouble because they're using a "Flexi Floor" that could be stopped via a technical directive. Anyone know if that's going to be in place for this race?
 
Soldato
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Not expecting too much here, will be an interesting test of Merc's performance though, have they tamed the car or was it flattered by the billiard table smooth Silverstone Circuit? Certainly not going to get that at the Red Bull Ring.
 
Soldato
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Thanks for the thread @chrismscotland.



Yeah, last year having two races here when the RBR was so ridiculously dominant somewhat skews the perception of the track. I hope we don't see the same thing again this weekend.

I've seen rumours that RBR and Ferrari might be in trouble because they're using a "Flexi Floor" that could be stopped via a technical directive. Anyone know if that's going to be in place for this race?

No worries. Not sure about the rumours to be honest, I don't think there's any new directives for this race at all, even the "porpoising" stuff has been put off to France.
 
Commissario
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I remember the atmosphere being fantastic for the two races last year but the track action wasn't especially exciting. I'm not expecting much.
 
Soldato
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No worries. Not sure about the rumours to be honest, I don't think there's any new directives for this race at all, even the "porpoising" stuff has been put off to France.

Ah ok, so this new TD could come in for France.

Paul Ricard should be smooth as well, so a track that suits the Merc and their two biggest rivals facing a potential performance hit — nothing like getting my hopes up. :o :cry:
 
Soldato
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Does seem a strange track for a sprint weekend.

I remember a few suspension failures over the years with the old cars on the harsh curbs so these new stuff cars could fall to pieces if you run over them.
 
Soldato
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Rb and ferraris flexing floor might be what helps them get the grip but keep the ride height up enough to not bounce. They might be a bit lower in France and porposing might apear.
 
Soldato
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Last race weekend Ferrari and Red Bull can have flexible floors. I wonder if they have enough time to avoid massive porpoising.
 
Associate
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Do people really think it will make that much difference?

If you're a die hard fan of another team/driver then people will use anything for "copium", just another case of it, common place in sports :p. It may have some affect but it's not going to be like when they banned e.g. blown diffusers or electronic driver aid (FW15C) - admittedly not midseason but drastic changes that would inevitably impact teams who'd perfected/implemented them.

I do think technical directives to reduce porpoising are important though. It's an odd situation. If it was found that allowing the mid/rear section of the plank to flex slightly was reducing porpoising, even inadvertently, then allowing all teams to do so would actually improve driver health/safety (IF, that was actually the case upon investigation/testing). Hence this being a strange situation, on the one hand it's normal for teams to bend the rules and then the FIA tighten them, it's always been the case. However in this specific example it could actually be counter productive, outlawing something that could actually solve another issue, as long as said solution isn't posing any safety concerns when racing.

Again, this is only the case if RBR and Ferrari are the teams in question and their interpretation/designs have also reduced porpoising. But if so, at least as a driver in the teams suffering with poor ride quality, I would want my team to implement similar designs, if only for selfish reasons.

Will be interesting to see what the outcome is. This is one of the reasons I love F1 though, the engineering is simply sublime.
 
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