Biwiring

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Hi
could anyone tell me the advantages gained through biwiring speakers because i just dont get it, i can see how bi amping would improve things with a seperate channal running to mid/bass and tweeter but is'nt biwiring just splitting the signal at the amp end rather than at the speaker end? I have some B&W dm601 s3, i have'nt tried biwiring but am just curious as to wether there is anything to be gained..
thanks.
 
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pzblues:

The theory goes (I think) that when you separate the high frequencies from the low/mid (which bi-wiring does), that you get a better listening experience.

Some people say they can hear the difference, others say they can't, so I suppose if you really want to find out if it is for you, simply try it and see. :)
 
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I didn't notice a huge difference and I still not convinced it isn't just me wanting it to be better to justify the cost. Different people will tell you different things, main reason my current setup is Bi-Wired is that the cables are all under the floor and I plan to add a power amp at some point so will need the extra cable runs.

Best advice is suck it and see, you maybe one of those people for whom it makes a massive difference, in which case it is a cheap upgrade.
 

daz

daz

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jbloggs said:
pzblues:

The theory goes (I think) that when you separate the high frequencies from the low/mid (which bi-wiring does), that you get a better listening experience.

pzblues said:
Hi
but is'nt biwiring just splitting the signal at the amp end rather than at the speaker end?

Point is, you're not splitting the frequencies at all - the same signal is travelling down both wires. The only thing that can filter the frequencies are the crossovers, and you don't hit those until the signal gets to the speaker.

Certain car audio amps have "active" crossovers (that is, the signal is modified/filtered before amplification) but I haven't seen these in a home hi-fi setting.
 
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Frankly you're better off simply buying a single set of cables for twice the price. You'd probably notice the difference from that (assuming you accept that not all cables are the same).

Ref active crossovers. Yes they do exist, but they're quite rare now.
 
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Mr_Sukebe said:
Frankly you're better off simply buying a single set of cables for twice the price. You'd probably notice the difference from that (assuming you accept that not all cables are the same).

Agree. I bi-wired and wished I had saved the money. Plus its annoying to manage twice the cable.
 
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yep, total waste of dosh, your just replacing the binding post link.

far easier to use a single run of cable, then with an extra bit of left over cable, replace the binding post plates with speaker cable. has the same effect as bi-wiring
 
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kidloco said:
yep, total waste of dosh, your just replacing the binding post link.

far easier to use a single run of cable, then with an extra bit of left over cable, replace the binding post plates with speaker cable. has the same effect as bi-wiring


Correct and worth doing this....

Re Active Speakers/amps..... very nearly all Linn Speakers can be made active, and have been so for decades..... it's a huge difference.... and quite expensive.
 
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kidloco said:
yep, total waste of dosh, your just replacing the binding post link.

far easier to use a single run of cable, then with an extra bit of left over cable, replace the binding post plates with speaker cable. has the same effect as bi-wiring

Thats a thought, but the binding post link is generally only about an inch long so i don't see how it would make much difference. I suppose two different type's of single cable, like one which gave good bass response, then another which gave good treble performance could be used to biwire, that to me would make some sense, at least the cable would actually have a bearing on the different frequencies...
 
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pzblues said:
Thats a thought, but the binding post link is generally only about an inch long so i don't see how it would make much difference. I suppose two different type's of single cable, like one which gave good bass response, then another which gave good treble performance could be used to biwire, that to me would make some sense, at least the cable would actually have a bearing on the different frequencies...


It all depends on the quality of whatever is linkin gthem together, I have seen some truly shocking dirty, crap pieces of brass on quite expensive speakers. it also just guarentees that the same sonic charecter of the speaker cable is being passed to both drivers.

speakers.jpg


simple to do, cheap as chips upgrade, use the money saved and get a decent single run of speaker cable
 
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if you were going to bi amp I presume that you'd need a high quality signal level crossover before the power amps to separate the highs from the lows?

I run my speakers on a biwire cable but I've never really understood how it can help without a crossover in the setup somewhere before the cables....

I used to do this properly when I ran a very ghetto PA system of about 2KW at Uni (tri amp / cab treble, mid and bass front of house with full range speakers at the other end of the room), it was a long way away from an audiophile quality solution though.
 
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Active biamping is where it's at, that's splitting HF & LF at line level prior to amplification. Quite costly and limited to equipment. You need crossovers cards tailored to your speakers.

I just have passive biamping, two 2 channel poweramps, bi-amp speakers.
 
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squiffy said:
Active biamping is where it's at, that's splitting HF & LF at line level prior to amplification. Quite costly and limited to equipment. You need crossovers cards tailored to your speakers.

I just have passive biamping, two 2 channel poweramps, bi-amp speakers.

isn't that just sending full range to both cones (and both amps) and relying on the passive high pass / low pass filters in the cabinets?
 
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happytechie said:
isn't that just sending full range to both cones (and both amps) and relying on the passive high pass / low pass filters in the cabinets?

Nope. Your amplifier and speakers will still be receiving full-range and the amp will be amplying full-range, when it doesn't need to. When you go active bi-amping, then one 2 channel amp is only a HF amp, and the other is LF.


Source-->Pre-amp--->HF Crossver--->HF amp--->Treble
Source-->Pre-amp--->LF Crossver--->LF amp--->Bass

Each speaker has no crossover at all, the terminals go straight into the connectors of each driver.

Whatever you don't get the speaker cables mixed up! Poof! (bye bye treble)

Like I said active is better, but usually out of the range of most people, passive bi-amping is fairly easy as you use existing speakers with the two terminals and just add another identical amp from the same amp company, or buy two stereo poweramps.
 
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daz said:
Certain car audio amps have "active" crossovers (that is, the signal is modified/filtered before amplification) but I haven't seen these in a home hi-fi setting.

If/when I upgrade i'd definately be going for active crossovers. Of course it helps that I can build said crossovers (and pre-amp/volume control) myself much more cheaply than commercial units and with any crossover freq + slope that I want. I might even build my own speakers, but thats a far more risky business, too much potential to fail.
 
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squiffy said:
Active biamping is where it's at, that's splitting HF & LF at line level prior to amplification. Quite costly and limited to equipment. You need crossovers cards tailored to your speakers.

I just have passive biamping, two 2 channel poweramps, bi-amp speakers.

Plenty of adjustable crossovers out there so they can be tailored to your speakers characteristics.

Other big advantage of active cross overs is that the signal being dealt with is small so a much more delicate unit can be used, as opposed to the crude items required at amplified level.
 
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