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Bought a collection of parts that once resembled a Japanese 400cc

Discussion in 'Biker's Cafe' started by Lopéz, May 14, 2019.

  1. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    Honestly I don't know why I sign myself up for this sort of grief.

    1980-something Yamaha FZR400 "bitsa", finally all my OWO1 fantasies have (sort of) come true:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Excuse the sophisticated anti-hydration devices courtesy of Asda & Morrisons (OTHER SUPERMARKETS ARE AVAILABLE)

    This is a right old mix of parts. From what I can work out it's a combination of 3EN1 and 3EN2 bits, not all of which work in complete harmony.

    Frame, logbook, engine, forks, swingarm, tank cover, brakes (ie almost everything) - 3EN1
    Plastics & subframe - 3EN2
    Headlight annoyingly is 3EN1 which means it looks odd in the 3EN2 fairing.

    The good:
    It runs. After a bit of coaxing and tinkering it sounds lovely and sweet actually
    It's not bent/crashed
    Someone spent money on it - forks, front wheel, swingarm, triple clamps and a few other bits are all nicely powder coated, lots of stainless bolts
    No evidence of having been down the road - engine covers, pegs, engine cradle etc all very nice
    Exup valve works
    Got a box of bits with clocks and some other bits like the mudguard

    The bad:
    Missing rear light plastics
    Missing pillion pad
    Missing battery box
    Missing seat bracketry
    Missing screen
    Missing left switchgear
    Calipers horribly siezed
    Plastics all cracked/broken/scuffed/broken tabs/bits missing

    Job 1:
    Fuel tank was battered and the paint all coming off. Sanded back, filled all dents, primed, sanded again and now ready for top coat:

    [​IMG]

    When my whitemorph arrives I'll see about patching up the fairings, and I have some replacement brakes on the way.

    Let's see how it goes :o
     
  2. Armageus

    Don

    Joined: May 19, 2012

    Posts: 11,027

    Location: Spalding, Lincolnshire

    Subbed - I know absolutely nothing about bikes and don't really have any interest in them, but really enjoy these style of re-build logs.
     
  3. tom_e

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 26, 2003

    Posts: 26,856

    Location: West mids

    In! Looks like it'll be interesting
     
  4. Diddums

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 24, 2012

    Posts: 19,419

    Location: London

    Hnnnnnnngggggg!!!!! These little Jap 4 cylinders are silly awesome bikes, that 13k redline is enough to make anyone want to wring the thing to within an inch of its life every time you click the gear lever up a notch. Extremely highly strung and require loads of maintenance but if properly taken care of will never let you down and will be the most fun you can have on public roads. Yes a liter bike is fun but you're generally at license losing speeds in first gear whereas these will scream like banshees with all the drama and theater but still at legal (and much safer) speeds. If I'm not mistaken these are oversquare pistons as well so make sure you check your oil twice as often as you would any other bike.



    These are the only things that come close to a 250cc two stroke in terms of fun, although I really want a CBR250RR, that 20k redline is hilarious.




    I can't remember where I read it / saw it but the story behind these little bikes which are over-engineered to ridiculous levels is that in the 90s the Japanese government classed anything over 400cc as a heavy motorcycle, which brought with it all sorts of implications for both rider and manufacturer, which they did right as sports bikes were starting to explode in terms of popularity, thereby creating an extremely competitive scene amongst the manufacturers to make the most technologically advanced bikes possible under 400cc, which is why we had loads of little screamers with double discs, fuel injection, upside down forks, fully adjustable shocks, etc. If I had the space I'd probably collect these little monsters, absolutely love them.
     
  5. BUDFORCE

    Wise Guy

    Joined: May 3, 2012

    Posts: 2,032

    Watch out for the front sprocket nut, either it, or the retaining pin, I cant remember which, but one is prone to shearing off, apparently is pretty common on these bikes.
     
  6. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    I'd love a CBR250RR but they are not cheap or easy to come by. Incredible little bikes though.

    Today's adventure:

    Wrong lights:
    [​IMG]

    Right lights:
    [​IMG]

    I'm not sure which I actually prefer, I quite liked it with the wrong lights :o
     
  7. vanpeebles

    Soldato

    Joined: Aug 22, 2004

    Posts: 6,510

    Location: County Durham

    Me too :D
     
  8. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    Oh well, they were only £20 and now I can have the choice. Not like it's going anywhere soon.

    Tank is now white, needs masking up and then the red can go on. I'm not the best painter but I hope I can get something passable.
     
  9. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    Started looking at the wiring loom today. At some point this was obviously destined to be a track bike, as someone has removed bits of the wiring loom but not all of it. I hate wiring so this is going to be fun!
     
  10. Malt_Vinegar

    Don

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 15,174

    Location: In a house

    You can do it! Wiring is just about being methodical, labelling as you go and get a decent set of crimpers.
    Great project! I am in the hunt for my first bigger bike as if today. Very jealous!
     
  11. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    You know what mate, I'm glad you posted this - because I went away and thought about it and knocked up a very simple test lamp rig and whaddaya know:

    [​IMG]

    Figured out the horn, indicators, brake light switches, tail lights, headlights, pass light, starter button and the kill switch - so now I can make my own lighting loom.
    The only parts I need to map back to the bike are the ignition/kill and the starter button - the rest of it is sorted.

    I've ordered a universal indicator relay and picked up some wire, so now I just need to assemble the loom making sure I leave in some free tails for the instrument tell-tales.

    [​IMG]

    I'll relay the headlamps too, since they are dual H4s.
     
  12. Diddums

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 24, 2012

    Posts: 19,419

    Location: London

    Now we're talking, fantastic work :D
     
  13. Malt_Vinegar

    Don

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 15,174

    Location: In a house

    Get in :D The sky is the limit now you have demystified the first part, it all just snowballs from there.
    Watching with interest!
     
  14. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    Quick update:

    The rear master cylinder was in a foul state, and I discovered it's actually cheaper to buy a whole new one than to recondition the old one myself.

    [​IMG]

    This is now fitted and awaiting bleeding & connection to the rear pedal. I'll need a rear brake switch as someone has removed the factory one.

    The same was true of the rear caliper, so let's have a new one of those too:

    [​IMG]

    The finish on these reconditioned calipers is never amazing, but I think it's good enough. The gold is a bit bright to be honest.

    Whilst on the topic of brakes, my R6 calipers arrived, they are in almost perfect condition - gave them a quick wipe down with brake cleaner and they are ready to go on. Complete bargain for £40!

    [​IMG]

    They are a direct swap, so a really easy upgrade - but I'll probably want some custom flexis made up at some point to make sure these slightly longer hoses don't foul the fairing.

    Finally the wiring is progressing. It might not look it, but this is a fully functioning lighting loom!

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  15. Malt_Vinegar

    Don

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 15,174

    Location: In a house

    Best way to do it, make everything too long and cut it back in situ :)
    Great progress!
     
  16. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    Yep, it's laid out on the bike now and I've started to wrap it with loom tape and started fitting connectors. My clocks have arrived now so I can figure out what I need to get the idiot lights fully functional. I've already worked out the indicator and main beam tell tales, and the clocks are always illuminated so that's one less connection. Neutral switch feed I've identified from the bike loom.

    The clocks have provision for a gear position indicator but the bike doesn't, so I'm not sure whether to try and rig something up or just leave that feature redundant.
     
  17. InvaderGIR

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 14, 2005

    Posts: 17,489

    Location: Bristol

    Might be worth investigating that like Malt did on the 125? It's certainly a handy thing to have displaying while riding although not essential.
     
  18. Malt_Vinegar

    Don

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 15,174

    Location: In a house

    I found this quote on an FZR forum:
     
  19. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    Cheers, definitely something to consider!

    Fairing annoyance today. As I said earlier, the bike is a 3EN1 but the fairing is 3EN2. Luckily it came with the right fairing stay, but annoyingly the 3EN2 had different forks and clip ons below the top yoke - the 3EN1 has them above the yoke, so a 3EN2 fairing on a 3EN1 means the bars and controls hit the fairing, which is a no-no.
    So, I need to move the clip ons below the yoke, and fiddle around with the master cylinder mountings etc to get everything clear.

    You can see why people give up with projects like this, what starts as a good idea often ends up as a money/effort pit.
     
  20. Lopéz

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 27,456

    Location: Leicestershire

    Battery box arrived. Existing battery doesn't fit into it :rolleyes:

    HO HUM