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Brexit Discussion - The new thread

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Feek, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 44,535

    nice bit of virtue signalling here, spotted by Guido Fawkes



    Oh look, she's well aware of the phrase and used it herself previously... but why buck the trend of the opposition raising pointless points of order.

     
  2. inogen

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 19, 2009

    Posts: 3,753

    I've got to say, he's totally correct. What example does this give to the public?

    Oh, the law, **** that. I can disagree with it and if I play the game I can ignore it. It's abominable. He should be locked up for contempt.
     
  3. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 65,592

    Why is Sajid Javid sitting there looking like someone has a gun to his head?
     
  4. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 44,535

    They ruled it was a political issue, that it was "non-justiciable".
     
  5. chroniclard

    Capodecina

    Joined: Apr 23, 2014

    Posts: 14,228

    Location: Hertfordshire

    11 supreme court judges say you and him are talking guff. LOL
     
  6. NiCkNaMe

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 17, 2005

    Posts: 3,042

    I'm not the most clued up on legalese, but the supreme court developed common law in this case, by setting a new legal precedent. Comments have been made that under this new principle some previous prorogations would have also been ruled unlawful.

    So with that in mind, has he broken an existing law? Or has he broken a newly developed interpretation? In my opinion there's a pretty big difference
     
  7. Steampunk

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 1, 2013

    Posts: 6,944

    At the level of the High Court, and leave was given to appeal to the Supreme Court. That's how it's supposed to work. Otherwise you'd have a situation where anything politicians do becomes a "political issue", even (as in this case) breaking the law, and the courts are just supposed to ignore it?

    No government is above the law.
     
  8. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 44,535

    No, I think the 11 Supreme Court judges are well aware of the High Court ruling.

    I get that you might want the AG to be this complete numpty who has got this completely wrong but the fact still remains that the High court ruled as it did and there are various high profile legal bods out there seemingly supporting him.

    I'll point out again that rather tellingly the SNP MP who is also a QC isn't calling for his resignation over this matter and explained that in the house today, it is Labour who is trying to point score over it and it seems you and the other poster are getting rather carried away with it yourself...
     
  9. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 44,535

    No one has claimed otherwise, where has anyone said in here that the courts are to ignore it? I'm really not sure what your point is in relation to my post, that post you quoted simply replied to answer a question you asked!
     
  10. Cern

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 3, 2008

    Posts: 3,460

    Location: London

    Well that statement from Johnson was pure, unadulterated populist garbage and diversionary bluster. Not a hint of contrition or apology. Did anyone expect otherwise? Probably not, but it doesn't make it any more palatable.

    Then a lacklustre response from Corbyn, not nearly strong or forceful enough.

    And then it descended into exchanging pathetic taunts and insults.

    All while the country falls apart with appallingly poor governance and crippling uncertainty.

    What an embarrassment.
     
  11. Stretch

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 14, 2004

    Posts: 11,615

    Location: Peoples Republic of Histonia, Cambridge

    For the love of all that's decent get someone else to do it.

    How Boris has managed to come out of this alive let alone on top is incomprehensible.
     
  12. Firestar_3x

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 11, 2005

    Posts: 29,628

    Location: Leafy Cheshire

    In-front of his bedroom mirror?
     
  13. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 22,750

    In a Normal universe, first of all... they wouldn’t have even attempted this, secondly... anyone who’s position is made disgraced (grayling should have been fired ages ago for example), should she down as a matter of honour for the position.

    But we have deeply unpatriotic individuals here, who don’t care beyond party politics or their career.
     
  14. Btone

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jan 23, 2003

    Posts: 1,122

    Location: N.I.

    my answer was to

    we had over 20 years in the EEC before it became the EU, 20 years of the minority leavers lied to us, made up fake news all to discredit the EEC/EU

    and then 20 more years of there lies while we in the EU

    and now we have a MINORITY government trying to forces it will on the UK sovereign parliament
     
  15. chrismscotland

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 16, 2009

    Posts: 2,487

    He comes across much better on the campaign trail, I'm no Corbyn voter but some of his rally's in the 2017 campaign were excellent
     
  16. NiCkNaMe

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 17, 2005

    Posts: 3,042

    This is why there is dissatisfaction with parliament being recalled. They fulfil a purpose, but with regards to Brexit they have failed miserably and this is now distracting from all the work that needs to occur between now and October the 31st.
     
  17. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 22,750

    The reality is that parliament deserves rightly to be able to sit, judge the ministers responsible for their lack of action or misaction.

    People dissatisfied with democracy should just leave.
     
  18. PapaLazaru

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2009

    Posts: 17,528

    So more work would have taken place during prorogation? I'm not getting your point?
     
  19. FoxEye

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 17, 2006

    Posts: 22,038

    Location: Cornwall

    If you're a fan of deadlock, or a fan of puppet governments where the opposition parties force through legislation against the government's wishes.

    Whilst the opposition also realises that they, somewhat perversely, have more power (and/or political capital) outside of office than the government has in office. And also that a GE might well put an end to this farce.

    I'm not saying that we should play into the government's hands by having a GE right now, but surely the Fixed Term Parliaments Act has to be abolished immediately after the next GE. You can't let this particular situation arise again.
     
  20. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 44,535

    Why would he apologise when, at the time, they believed at the time that what they were doing was legal?