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Brexit Discussion - The new thread

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Feek, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 24,225

    So no US trade deal then?
     
  2. Trusty

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2006

    Posts: 11,299

    Location: On A Rocket

    The US has some of the highest standards/regulations in the world, along with the EU. It's not the same as dealing with someone like India.

    financial and agriculture could be wrapped up pretty dam quick.
     
  3. pingu666

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 6, 2008

    Posts: 1,881

    You guys are missing the point, while we are aligned now, brexiters want total freedom todo whatever they damn well want, which would be non alignment, or the eu will see it in that way, why carry that liability on their part?
     
  4. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 24,225

    That's the simplistic approach to the bigger issue, if we align with the EU the benefit of a trade deal with the US is very, very limited and Mr. America First isn't going to just sit by while the UK becomes irrelevant to them.
     
  5. Trusty

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2006

    Posts: 11,299

    Location: On A Rocket

    Why not allow adaptability for the manufactures and producers to align with whichever country they do the most business with?

    If a business does 80% with the EU, they will align themselves with the EU.
    If a business does 80% with America, they will align themselves with America, but without those costly tariffs which the EU imposed on
     
  6. pingu666

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 6, 2008

    Posts: 1,881

    to complex, and a uk company could easily put say usa chicken in microwave meals that are sold accross the eu.

    thats why brexiters never solved the northern ireland border issue, boris just threw the dup under the bus and segregated northern ireland. which does partly solve it, but northern ireland might benifit alot from it ironically.
     
  7. Kermit

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 27, 2002

    Posts: 2,662

    Location: UK

    I'm not sure we actually need or want a UK/US trade deal anyway given we've managed so far (while in the EU) without one and standard WTO tariffs.

    FTA's while they do have lots of plus points, they also have quite a few minus points eg the recent EU/Japan FTA lead to some Japanese car manufacturers moving production from EU/UK back to Japan & I can think of plenty of UK industries (Cadbury, Unilever etc) moving production from the UK to cheaper EU countries like Poland simply because once you have a FTA or tariff free zone (EU), production can be where ever is cheapest.

    No FTA with the EU could actually mean many food processing and other similar industrial productions moves some plants back to the UK to serve the UK market which at 65 million people, is large enough to support its own production sites
     
  8. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 15,634

    The US is our single biggest trade destination already, even with the tariffs.

    The best deal with the US would be to just reduce the tariff tbh. Doesn't really need anything special. If they can get it low enough US companies could undercut the EU's. Many things are already cheaper in the US but the tax kills it (unless you order in bulk).
     
  9. Trusty

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2006

    Posts: 11,299

    Location: On A Rocket

    Well that company won't last very long, will it.
     
  10. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 15,634

    Like horse meat you mean? :p
     
  11. Trusty

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2006

    Posts: 11,299

    Location: On A Rocket

    Ha, yea. Highest standards in the world remember :D
     
  12. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 66,810

    Regardless of standards the US will largely view us as an economy to plunder than a partner we won't have the same kind of relationship as the EU where it is at least somewhat tempered by the greater good of the bloc.
     
  13. Trusty

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2006

    Posts: 11,299

    Location: On A Rocket

    That's such tosh, the UK and the USA are close friends, we're partners to common enemies like China. They aren't going to oppress us to the point of changing loyalty. The US and the UK need each other..
     
  14. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 15,634

    The UK also has a number of alternative options to partner with. They will not want us making new deals with China, Russia, etc. because it shifts the global balance of power away from them.
     
  15. Trusty

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2006

    Posts: 11,299

    Location: On A Rocket

    Yea, we're intertwined with the US, you just have to look at the loyalty between the security services, we're like brothers, we wanna lift each other up, not create a rift.
     
  16. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 66,810

    Administration under Trump doesn't share that conviction who knows where that will go in the future and we won't exactly have many cards to play in a negotiation.
     
  17. Trusty

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2006

    Posts: 11,299

    Location: On A Rocket

    Our partnership goes well beyond Trump. Trumps mother was from Scotland, he owns land and business in this country as well.
     
  18. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 66,810

    You might want to google his reputation for how he runs his business in the UK.
     
  19. pingu666

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 6, 2008

    Posts: 1,881

    trump is a narc and has been easily played by bibi, russians, turkey, north korea, so its possible... but america is also a ocean away, and its foreign policy isnt nice.
     
  20. TJM

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 10, 2007

    Posts: 2,366

    You might want to read into the history of the 'special relationship', starting with the McMahon Act. Sentimentality counts for little in international relations and the US does not accommodate the UK unless it serves their interests.

    (Which isn't a criticism of the US as every country behaves the same way. But it's odd and slightly pathetic that some in the UK believe that US officials become all misty eyed when watching A Bridge Too Far and let it influence their decision making.)