1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Brexit Discussion

Discussion in 'SC Archive' started by FrenchTart, 11 Sep 2016.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. JHeaton

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Dec 2009

    Posts: 2,669

    Location: Lancashire

    I am not sure there is realistically any way to stop divisiveness surrounding this matter. The issue itself is inherently divisive and both sides want vastly different things, it seems. There is no way to come out of this with both groups happy, unfortunately.

    Not that I would advocate for anyone hurling insults, but I don't think stopping them will be a miracle cure.
     
  2. bayo000

    Soldato

    Joined: 28 Jan 2008

    Posts: 5,087

    Location: Manchester

    So you're saying that leaving the EU is wrong ;)
     
  3. do_ron_ron

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,832

    Yes but one side is based in reality and the other is based in a fantasy land where what they want is undeliverable. I heard that from a Tory MP interviewed this morning who was still going to vote for May's deal.
     
  4. inogen

    Soldato

    Joined: 19 Jul 2009

    Posts: 5,904

    I'll agree to stop insulting people who voted Brexit once they admit they were wrong and say sorry.

     
  5. JHeaton

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Dec 2009

    Posts: 2,669

    Location: Lancashire

    I don't really disagree, but whatever the outcome of this process when we finally reach its end, I am quite sure it's not the last we will hear of it for a long time.

    It's unfortunate but starting from day one only focusing on delivering for the 52% rather than a compromise which might be acceptable to the majority of both groups (whether or not there could ultimately be one) really set a sour note that ensured the debate would never be particularly friendly.
     
  6. VincentHanna

    Capodecina

    Joined: 30 Jul 2013

    Posts: 24,138

    It's weird that people think in a 'No deal' situation, the government wouldn't then still need to negotiate with the EU for years. The exact same sticking points would still come up as well.
     
  7. JHeaton

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Dec 2009

    Posts: 2,669

    Location: Lancashire

    Quite. Even after leaving without a deal, the EU have said that they will require the backstop as part of any deal and for the UK to pay the money it owes, which people think we can save by going for a no-deal exit (which already ignores all of the implications of doing this). It's worrying that politicians also seem to believe this, and they're the ones we are supposed to rely on to understand all of these things.
     
  8. do_ron_ron

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,832

    Our media must shoulder a lot of blame. The rags that have lied for decades about the EU set the tone and when social media arrived it provided a platform to talk about the seeds already planted. The BBC also must share some blame as they are petrified of being labelled biased and let people tell a lot of BS and do not pull them up on it. Contrast that with Farage in Eire being interviewed(vid earlier in this thread) and he got pulled up straight away when he started spouting BS.
     
  9. fez

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 Aug 2008

    Posts: 17,775

    Location: Tunbridge Wells

    The problem was that 52% of people (that voted) were voting to leave the EU based on very different ideas. Some wanted to leave even if it meant the country went to ****, other wanted to leave and thought it wouldn't be great but it would be better in the long term and others thought that we were billy big ******** and that the EU would bend over for us and give us a really nice exit and deal to boot.

    Then you have the 48% (over 2 years ago now so there are another 2 years worth of young voters who would vote now) who didn't want us to leave at all.

    Unless we got the super special, extra good deal that was a pipe dream, this whole thing was always going to be a massive mess. Any exit deal was almost guaranteed to **** off over half of the population. I mean, give the government their dues, they have made a spectacular mess of things but I think they trusted far too much in blind loyalty to the party and the vote when the reality is that MPs have actually used their heads and voted with their brains instead of along strict party lines.
     
  10. thenewoc

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Mar 2012

    Posts: 8,362

    Location: West Sussex, England

    'NO DEAL' likely for 12th April I see...
     
  11. RoboCod

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Jun 2004

    Posts: 19,103

    Location: On the Amiga500

    Or just not pay a thing?
     
  12. do_ron_ron

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,832

    There was a prog on last night about police chasing criminals and one was a Lithuanian who was wanted and our cops got him. If we leave with no deal or even on Mays deal that cooperation will be lost and the UK may become a hiding place for European criminals.
     
  13. Greebo

    Caporegime

    Joined: 20 Jan 2005

    Posts: 41,682

    Location: Co Durham

    That will be next week to get her 4th vote through
     
  14. inogen

    Soldato

    Joined: 19 Jul 2009

    Posts: 5,904

    There are a few headcases in parliament but most of the no dealers are either in hedge funds or are career politicians angling for populist votes. There's some crossover, like that ****head Francois.
     
  15. terley

    Mobster

    Joined: 3 Feb 2010

    Posts: 2,988

    Young voters are more likely to have been influenced and dare i say it indoctrinated by an unquestionably left-leaning education system...
     
  16. do_ron_ron

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,832

    The one thing that is almost guaranteed not to happen is a no deal.
     
  17. TheOracle

    Capodecina

    Joined: 30 Sep 2005

    Posts: 14,129

    You can put a hole in a granite wall with a toothpick if you keep scratching long enough
     
  18. do_ron_ron

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,832

    How very 70's.
     
  19. FortuitousFluke

    Mobster

    Joined: 7 Jul 2011

    Posts: 4,408

    Location: Cambridgeshire

    I completely agree. Let it die

    Ah. Meaningless vote 1!

    In other news I took a look at parliament square on my way to oxford street. Full of less that savoury characters and the gutters are full of empty beer cans. Looooot of drunk folk, high five for democracy, these are the people driving the Country at the moment.
     
  20. Gerard

    Caporegime

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 36,293

    Location: Ireland

    Loyalist flute bands showing up outside playing the sash etc...Suppose that had to happen at some point. :confused:
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.