1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Campaign to end the 'stigma' of obesity

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Uther, Oct 11, 2018.

  1. VincentHanna

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 30, 2013

    Posts: 18,875

    I don't know if it's because i'm not very organised in the kitchen, or because my kitchen is so small that I don't have space for a lot of time-saving gadgets, but I do find cooking from scratch seems to take about twice as long as the recipes often say.
     
  2. Avenged7Fold

    Capodecina

    Joined: Sep 12, 2012

    Posts: 11,623

    Location: Surrey

    Kitchen space isn't the issue and although it is nice to have a big kitchen, so long as you have enough surface to cut stuff on and something to cook stuff on/in, it shouldn't slow you down. Flashy gadgets can help with ambitious meals but not needed to be honest. I will concede that a bit of forward planning and a slow cooker and you have a great meal in the evening with minimal effort and no need to loiter around the kitchen but if people CBA to cook, then they will hardly be the type to plan a meal 8 hours ahead of time.

    Following a recipe is much like following directions from someone in the car while driving, requires a bit more concentration and time to follow instructions.

    If people are just looking to eat rather than follow any ambitious recipes, then something like pasta and basic pasta sauce takes 15 mins.

    Rice can be done in a microwave container in 10 minutes. During that time you can prep a number of things and wash up everything used so far

    Point being made is that i don't believe the excuse 'I'm fat because i can't cook due to cost/time/lack of skill'.
     
  3. Hotwired

    Soldato

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 7,043

    I think my total gadget collection consists of a stick blender and a digital thermometer :D

    Not even sure if they are gadgets. I think of kitchen gadgets as having niche purposes and low use.

    Someone enlighten me to useful gadgets in the kitchen.
     
  4. VincentHanna

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 30, 2013

    Posts: 18,875

    I 'cook' most nights, but often it's using jars of stuff rather than from scratch.

    I do make a Beef casserole in the slow cooker quite often, but even that I use those casserole veg packs you get from Aldi (still fresh veg though)

    My brain has an annoying inability to retain recipes as well, even if I've made something a few times.

    I make an ok seafood pasta from scratch, but that's pretty easy.
     
  5. Avenged7Fold

    Capodecina

    Joined: Sep 12, 2012

    Posts: 11,623

    Location: Surrey

    :)

    https://forums.overclockers.co.uk/threads/kitchen-gadgets.18837988/

    Gadgets are as useful as you make them. Don't make use of them and they are not useful.

    Sistema Microwave rice container - boom perfect fluffy white rice in 10 mins. Free's up space on the hob and requires 0 attention from when you press the button. Any leftover rice and the whole thing can go in the fridge.

    Electric Pressure cooker - Can do anything in one! Meals you would slow cook in 4-8 hours can be done in half an hour. Anything you can steam, pressure cook, slow cook, saute.

    Air fryer - For all else this thing is basically a fan oven on steroids. Speed cooks vast majority of things you can do in the oven or grill and makes it crispy with no extra oil.

    I often cook for a lot of people and enjoy it, so I have gadgets that free up hob space and often can just put the food in and leave it to it while i concentrate on my ambitious meals but in terms of day to day cooking for myself and my missus, they don't do anything that i couldn't do on the hob/oven using other methods.
     
  6. ci_newman

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 24, 2004

    Posts: 8,954

    Location: Hook, Hants

    I have a tiny kitchen, and in my experience it is a case of time management rather than lack of space. For example, when making a dish where you cook the chicken and then add the vegetables, my wife will prepare all the vegetables first then start cooking. Where-as I will start cooking the chicken, and whilst it is cooking I will prepare the veg - thus saving myself 5-10minutes as I am doing two tasks at once, rather than step by step. Most recipes work that way IME.
     
  7. VincentHanna

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 30, 2013

    Posts: 18,875

    I've bought the rice container now, that does seem very useful...Does the rice retain the same nutrients? I assume it's for standard rice only and not 'Quick cook' rice (which doesn't retain as many nutrients)
     
  8. Avenged7Fold

    Capodecina

    Joined: Sep 12, 2012

    Posts: 11,623

    Location: Surrey

    Same nutrients, all you are doing is steaming it the same way you would do in a rice cooker, pressure cooker or saucepan.

    You can use any rice but different rice has different timings and water ratio. Use same water ratio you would use as any other cooking method.

    Measure the rice out, rinse it if you want to rinse it and add boiling water instead of cold. Basmati I do for 10 minutes in the microwave on high. Brown rice varies and takes a bit longer depending on the rice (some need soaking but i usually skip this step and add some extra water with a longer microwave time).

    If you are not sure about timings, google is good for it.
     
  9. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 41,928

    ^^^ deffo worth rinsing the rice first, gets rid of starch from the surface and helps prevent clumping. I've not used a microwave rice thingie but I do love my rice cooker. Can do so much more than just making rice too, have got a rice cooker cook book - plenty of quick and easy meals to make.

    Cooking rice in the saucepan is pretty easy too, people do seem to frequently get it wrong in the UK though using too much water or leaving the lid off etc... leading to a stodgy mess.

    You can always prep stuff, a bunch of meals or parts of meals in one go, keep some things in the freezer etc.. to use over the next month or so.

    For example things like salmon is generally better to buy from say the fish counter at the supermarket or from the fishmonger than pre-packaged off the shelves - get the fishmonger to fillet it and keep everything, you can freeze a load of fillets for main meals and you have the extra stuff to throw into a fish pie or sandwiches or fish cakes or a quiche etc..
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2018
  10. Avenged7Fold

    Capodecina

    Joined: Sep 12, 2012

    Posts: 11,623

    Location: Surrey

    Cooking rice with the saucepan only really requires you to turn it off when the water has been absorbed but people still manage to get it wrong. I am half oriental and it sickens me the way i see rice being made sometimes: like pasta, draining it with a sieve when 'done'...

    yuck!

    The beauty of a rice cooker/pressure cooker/microwave bowl is that it frees up a hob space really and will keep the rice warm. Handy if you are cooking for a group and need the space or have a ludicrously sized cauldron/wok that encroaches on the other hobs.
     
  11. Hotwired

    Soldato

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 7,043

    The only problem I have with rice is cooking titchy amounts of it. How is it even possible to cook a 1 person portion of rice. On the other hand I'm not tall enough for my weight so maybe I should look at ways of cooking less more conveniently.

    I have pressure cookers, the noisy heavy metal types you can stick under the tap to rapidly cool off and I'm sure are terrifying to people who didn't grow up with them. 2/3 of the time I just use them as general purpose big heavy pots. I guess they're gadgets.

    I don't know who encourages that kind of rice cooking. Rice packets themselves give you the correct instructions.
     
  12. lltfdaniel

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Feb 23, 2009

    Posts: 2,112

    Location: Bournemouth

    Well I am overweight anyways my story.

    I was told to cut my sugar intake, so instead of sugar I get sugar free drinks with hardly any calories.

    When I started I was 27.7 stone and when I started to cut back from sugar I now weigh 24 stone so I am losing weight for sure and this is without exercise over a course of months.

    Yep well it all started when I saw to a dietician.

    Anything with high sugar or any sugar is totally forbidden in my diet well only a little bit of sugar I am allowed to have in my diet.

    So yeah drinks with hardly any calories and sweetener in my coffee since I drink more than I eat you see.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2018
  13. Minstadave

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 8, 2004

    Posts: 24,741

    Location: Rutland

    Did you need to see a dietitian to find this out? It seems kind of common sense. A good result none the less.
     
  14. lltfdaniel

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Feb 23, 2009

    Posts: 2,112

    Location: Bournemouth

    Yeah it took months to see a dietician because my dad was concerned about my weight so we went ahead to book an a appointment to see the dietician which again took months in advance.

    Well my dad always said about the sugar intake but I ignored that but when I saw to the dietician who said the same thing I decided to go with the dieticians advise and drastically cut back on the sugar and calories.
     
  15. Avenged7Fold

    Capodecina

    Joined: Sep 12, 2012

    Posts: 11,623

    Location: Surrey

    Well done but i think what Minstadave is asking is more why it didn't occur to you before?

    People get told the drinks are high in calories, the calories are written on the bottle and we are constantly bombarded with the obesity issue. What did the dietitian say to you that other people didn't already tell you or that you didn't already know to convince yourself?

    I consider weight loss on the biggest people more an issue of motivation rather than ignorance on the matter.

    Well done again on the initial weight loss. Now you have changed a big part of your lifestyle, are you encouraged to look at things like food or exercise at all?

    I am very much an all in sort of guy and when i decided to lose weight i really worked on nailing nutrition and soon it just became about being healthier and fitter so i started resistance training 5 days a week, cut my drinking to a minimum, cut my smoking and really looked into what i ate to maximize recovery time. I am pretty scared that if i ever lose interest i will catapult myself back to old habits of doing sweet nothing but for the last year its become a lifestyle and the whole process has become like a favourite hobby of mine rather than a restriction. There was a point a few months in where my motivation flipped from being fueled by dissatisfaction with myself to being driven by how far i have come and how far i plan to go.
     
  16. lltfdaniel

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Feb 23, 2009

    Posts: 2,112

    Location: Bournemouth

    I was really addicted to the food that i loved which wasn't doing me any good weight wise like the same when your addicted to tobacco.

    The reason why it did not occur to me is because i did not care about my body's weight simply put and your right that you have to be motivated to lose weight.

    I really did not care to know that a cut in the sugar and calories would prompt weight loss.

    Anyways i am drinking alot of this stuff picture below so 3 calories per 250ml :) i drink about around about 2 litres of this stuff plus coffee a day.

    [​IMG]

    Yeah well if you want to know it's called volvic lemon and lime mineral water.

    I used to drink lucozade sport that the calories in that is like a cheese burger like 500-600 calories when you drink 4 bottles @ 500ml each of that stuff anyways, you be surprised how much calories you put in your body i say.

    Diet coke and diet pepsi is okay for me to drink, anything that has very low calorie intake per 250ml and also sugar free just like volvic mineral water.

    I could go on and on :0).

    As for food, if i were to have a curry i would recommend using curry power and not curry sauce you buy in a jar from the shop and that alone really cuts back on the fat sugar.

    As for exercise, i was told that you start off in small steps like takeing a 15 minute long walk each day and build that up over time you see, so it becomes a 30 minute walk etc each day.

    Just so the body can cope with it you see because of carrying too much weight then after that you will feel better.

    The only reason why i am keen to lose weight is because i feel shocked at how fat my body was by looking in the mirror so yea..
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2018
  17. nox_uk

    Hitman

    Joined: Sep 12, 2006

    Posts: 626

    Similar yet different story to @lltfdaniel - except I didn't start with what most people consider overweight. (85kg & 6'1") Last year I wasn't feeling great, running out of energy, struggling to walk up a local hill, which was completely not me. So went to see the doc - one test later, pre-diabetes. I cut out ALL added sugar. Side effect was my weight dropped at an alarming rate - just under 1kg a week, but it stabilised and i'm now 71-72kg. The learning to cook/takes too long - well yes, at first. but when you've learnt how to make things, and don't need to look at the recipe book, and read each line 3 times, and have practiced chopping veg etc - it's not slow anymore. It's like anything, it's just a case of skilling up. Learnt a lot about how our bodies work with food, and what exact foods to avoid (there is a cheap brand of plain chicken breast with added sugar... like WHAT??!?) Swapping to fruit, rather than fruit juice (slows down digestion, meaning it's easier for your body to deal with etc)

    Feels like i've hacked my body :D I really do blame the food industry for putting sugar everywhere - normal folks are going up against massive corporations trying to get us addicted to their products :( What chance do we have?!!? The sugar tax should be quadrupled, and the profits used to offset fresh fruit & veg, non processed meats, nuts etc.
     
  18. Tony Edwards

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 4, 2018

    Posts: 3,124

    Well done for teaching yourself about food and cooking, most diabetics/people dont bother to learn or change enough until its too late and it ends up having devastating effects on their lives. People are rarely given credit for the positive lifestyle changes they make.
    Personaly I think the food companies should be made to make their products less unhealthy rather than the end user just having to pay more for it.
     
  19. nox_uk

    Hitman

    Joined: Sep 12, 2006

    Posts: 626

    Thanks:) I felt a lot came down to education, and my lack of it. 'Food' wasn't taught by my parents (ready meals/microwaves didn't exist back then) and home economics classes were either how to bake a cake or make macaroni cheese. I don't know where the responsibility should lie these days - parents, society, individuals, schools or the food industry. I guess each has an input on your welfare into adulthood. Decided that I would take responsibility for my own health - I am the only person that can be guaranteed to change me. The 'contains x grams of y' labels on food these days is also really helpful. A step in the right direction.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2018
  20. krooton

    Caporegime

    Joined: May 9, 2004

    Posts: 25,221

    Location: Leafy outskirts of London

    Ultimately it should sit with the parents during the entire childhood, but even that doesn't guarantee the kid doesn't make poor dietary choices in adulthood.