Curries

Soldato
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There are all different types or styles, no idea if these are authentic or traditional recepies, I guess not.

But you get a Korma, this one is somewhat consistent.

Then Jalfresi, Rogan Josh, Phaal, Vindaloo etc etc etc ......the list goes on.

What I find though, is ones restaurant/take away/jar of sauce Jalfresi say, can seem to vastly differ from another, and I never really know what the base line for each is (if there is such a thing) and I'm putting it out there to ocuk to give a small summary of what each type is supposed to be like

I suspect I'll get a whole ton of different answers and opinions that'll prove my point, maybe not. I'm interested and it'll certainly be educational and help anyone next time they are trying to make a choice.
 
Associate
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Each place and home will make its own gravy and tbh and it is a pinch of this, a glug of that and a handful of this.

Much the same when travelling through Malaysia where every village can have a completely different version of the same national dish, same with Kimchi in Korea.
 
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Caporegime
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Jalfrezi should be a thick sauce with a slightly reddish tint. It should be hot (madras level) and it should have meat, onion, coriander, bell pepper and very hot whole green chillies. The sauce should also have a mild lime hint to it. It has a very fragrant smell to it.

needless to say, jars and supermarket curries don’t come close.
 
Associate
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Every curry house will differ, nothing is completely the same. Like vindaloo traditionally uses pork. Not chicken etc. More British curries tend to lean to the more spicy side for the British pallet than actual dishes in India iirc.
 
Soldato
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Go to India and have spicy food there, not even a curry, different world. See the fly ridden chicken carcasses hanging off the frame of a 3 wheeler and you’ll soon be a vegetarian like they all are :D

eta, if it’s got meat in it, unlikely it’s really indian.
 
Soldato
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Go to India and have spicy food there, not even a curry, different world. See the fly ridden chicken carcasses hanging off the frame of a 3 wheeler and you’ll soon be a vegetarian like they all are :D

eta, if it’s got meat in it, unlikely it’s really indian.

lul
 
Associate
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Go to India and have spicy food there, not even a curry, different world. See the fly ridden chicken carcasses hanging off the frame of a 3 wheeler and you’ll soon be a vegetarian like they all are :D

eta, if it’s got meat in it, unlikely it’s really indian.
Total bs
 
Associate
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Tell that to the Jains!

In my experience, in Maharashtra only though, most people I've met or known are vegetarian as has been the food on offer, with the exception of Chinese resteraunts.

Your experiences of course may vary.
I'm not saying vegetarian food isn't popular. I particularly love vegetarian street food in Maharashtra. But the idea that most Indians, including Maharashtrians, are vegetarian or that if food has meat in it it somehow isn't Indian is just plain wrong - nothing to do with individual experiences. I'd recommend trying pandhra rassa and kheema pav next time you are in Maharashtra, you are in for a treat.
 
Soldato
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I went to Sri Lanka in 2004 and all the places we visited for lunch/dinner were mostly vegetable dishes, the only places that had more meat dishes were all the hotel complexes.

Im not normally a fan of curries, as I very rarely eat one where I think it was actually tasty. The only exceptions to that is my friend is a Pakistani and his wifes food is amazing and a Sri Lankan fish curry with coconut sambal and rice I had on a cycling tour of Sri Lanka
 
Capodecina
Soldato
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There are all different types or styles, no idea if these are authentic or traditional recepies, I guess not.

But you get a Korma, this one is somewhat consistent.

Then Jalfresi, Rogan Josh, Phaal, Vindaloo etc etc etc ......the list goes on.

What I find though, is ones restaurant/take away/jar of sauce Jalfresi say, can seem to vastly differ from another, and I never really know what the base line for each is (if there is such a thing) and I'm putting it out there to ocuk to give a small summary of what each type is supposed to be like

I suspect I'll get a whole ton of different answers and opinions that'll prove my point, maybe not. I'm interested and it'll certainly be educational and help anyone next time they are trying to make a choice.

I see that no-one has actually answered your question, so I'll have a go.

Korma - thick, creamy, mild, a little sweet.
Jalfrezi - medium thick sauce, tomato-based, has to have a decent amount of green chilli. Quite hot. Currently my curry of choice or....
Naga - medium thick sauce, tomato-based, very hot if done correctly. Very noticeable tangy lingering flavour.
Rogan Josh - not saucy so much as a thin tomato-based coat, a lot of flavour, normally quite mild. You wouldn't want too much heat or it would spoil the flavour, which can be really good.
Vindaloo - thick dark sauce. Normally has one potato and noticeable garlic in the sauce. Can go from medium hot to very hot depending on where you get it from. No consistency in the heat, each place will do it differently.
Phall - this can be amazing or terrible depending on where you get it from. A good one has a lot of heat, a medium thick sauce with notable tomato and garlic, and a fruity, habanero flavour to it. A bad one will taste of nothing but a load of chilli powder. I tend to avoid them these days since most will be in the latter category, so I'll go for a Naga instead.
 
Soldato
OP
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So few more I've learned.

Biryani - like a dry dish, so normally marinated meat and vegetables cooked in rice, almost (somewhat) like a Spanish pealla.

Tandoori - anything cooked in a Tandor oven but basically a BBQ.

Balti???????
 
Capodecina
Soldato
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Biryani - as you say, dry, marinated meat or vegetables in rice. Mild. Tends to come with a side of vegetable curry, which is mild-medium in heat.
Tandoori - again, you're correct on the above, pretty much like a BBQ but with different spices to what we would use. Dry. Tender meat. Mild/medium with a slight burned flavour, normally a distinctive red colour from turmeric and chili.
Balti - medium heat with a thick sauce with onion and garlic and tomato. Not as strong in flavour as some of the others here. Was very popular in the 2000s but its popularity has waned in the favour of some of the other traditional ones you've mentioned.
 
Capodecina
Soldato
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Ceylon is not that hot. It's a little coconuty but with some tomato. Medium heat iirc and I tiny bit sweet, probably why it makes you think of korma.
 
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