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Do you throw away lots of food?

Discussion in 'La Cuisine' started by cheesefest, 14 Sep 2021.

  1. dave28

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 28 Jun 2013

    Posts: 1,264

    I used to work for a restaurant who had mountains of food waste from customers so the owner would feed it to pigs and then feed the pigs to the customers so there was zero waste in a way.

    I had no idea until later on that it was illegal, it seemed like such a good solution lol. People loved that bacon, the pigs loved the food and the owner had low costs to keep the pigs and no food waste.
     
  2. BUDFORCE

    Mobster

    Joined: 3 May 2012

    Posts: 3,815

    Do you know why it's illegal? Seems crazy.
     
  3. robfosters

    Caporegime

    Joined: 1 Dec 2010

    Posts: 40,041

    Location: Welling, London

    No I cant, I don’t eat the same food. Once I have something like sausage and mash, I won’t want it again for another month or so, so the leftovers have to go. And I cant freeze everything as I just don’t have the space.
     
  4. Ayahuasca

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Apr 2014

    Posts: 23,807

    Location: Huem

    I believe there are strict laws in place in terms of what you can feed livestock animals that are being bred for consumption.
     
  5. Martynt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Feb 2004

    Posts: 17,076

    Location: Higher Walton

    I'd say we have very little. We plan our weekly meals in advance and make stuff fresh and so only buy what we need for that week.

    As above, the only stuff we'll throw away is if something goes off a little earlier than expected, but that's rare as Waitrose stuff usually last ages vs Aldi/Lidl produce. I've eaten apples 3 weeks after buying them and they still have a crunch.
     
  6. azazl187

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2010

    Posts: 3,003

    Very rarely do we throw away food. Nor ally vegetables if we do that have slightly turned.

    We do a weekly shop and plan every meal
     
  7. One More Solo

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Dec 2004

    Posts: 16,175

    Location: Manchester

    Pretty sure you are just trolling at this stage, or being intentionally difficult. I simply refuse to believe you eat 90 unique meals a month. Even so, there are ways around this that don't require intentional waste.
     
  8. robfosters

    Caporegime

    Joined: 1 Dec 2010

    Posts: 40,041

    Location: Welling, London

    It’s not intentional. I try to eat everything I buy, but often I can’t. I don’t eat vreakfast or lunch, just dinner, so it’s 30 meals a month
     
  9. jpaul

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Mar 2010

    Posts: 14,887

    If you are cooking from scratch'ish, too, with the investment of time/resources, cooking additional portions to refrigerate/freeze for a subsequent day is a pleasure,
    probably modifying the vegetables/carbs next days ; puddings, doubly so, bakewell/lemon meringue ....
    you save massive anmounts of time on following days.
     
  10. KompuKare

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 31 Dec 2010

    Posts: 1,072

    Yes, sorry should have made that clear.

    If you have managed to make a bread with properly developed crumb structure (which even after you have a sourdough starter, might take 20 hrs or so with a pre-ferment and poolish), something like this:
    [​IMG]
    Then you don't have to eat it right away as it will freeze and should taste quite good toasted.
     
  11. UnknownDonut

    Associate

    Joined: 14 Sep 2021

    Posts: 10

    Location: UK

    Some weeks we seem to plow through Bread, others it just doesnt get touched and ends up in the bin, Not a fan of bread thats been defrosted.
     
  12. SoliD

    Capodecina

    Joined: 25 Feb 2004

    Posts: 15,880

    Location: Portsmouth

    Rarely, occasionally throw away some bruised fruit or old veg if it gets stuck at the bottom of the drawer, but try to freeze or use in sauces/smoothies anything thats a bit ropey looking as it usually tastes fine underneath. Usually cook 3 or 4 portions most evenings and put leftovers in fridge/freezer for the next day or later. Think it's just me being tight though, hate wasted food.
     
  13. cheesefest

    Gangster

    Joined: 18 Jul 2021

    Posts: 421

    Location: Leicestershire

    I live alone. If I bought a pack of two fish cakes (the deep ones with a parsley sauce centre) - I eat one that day. Then freeze the other one by wrapping it in foil and write on a food bag - what it is and cooking instructions.

    I never buy the small tins of baked beans for example as a normal can is only 5-10p more than half a can. Put the other half into a food storage pot in the fridge to use in the next 4-5 days.

    If supermarkets do single portions, think how much more plastic is used and if, taking the fish as an example was £2.30 for 2, it will be £1.50-1.80 for one.
     
  14. Changesx

    Gangster

    Joined: 2 Jul 2021

    Posts: 113

    Location: United Kingdom

    Ugh sometimes I don’t cook the food that I buy for the gym and then they become off and get chucked in the bin. Really bad habit and will definitely ensure I change that because I hate wasting food
     
  15. nine_tails

    Hitman

    Joined: 7 Mar 2015

    Posts: 755

    Try not to , i think i do pretty well.. have a food bin too , so hoping this gets composted or something when they collect it.
     
  16. b0rn2sk8

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Mar 2003

    Posts: 8,650

    Very rarely anything goes in the bin here. We do a fair amount of cooking from scratch and it’s easy to use up any leftover veg into sauces and we only generally buy what we need from a list, particularly meat.

    We often cook 4+ portions of scratch made food and put the extra in the freezer alongside leftovers for future use. The small IKEA containers with yellow lids are perfectly sized for single portion leftovers.

    The list is key for not wasting food IMO, it stops overbuying, stops the associated waste and cuts the cost of shopping.

    like it or not, decaying food in landfill is a huge source of greenhouse and toxic gases. Just ask the locals in ‘the smell’ thread. Farming has a huge, well documented impact on the environment (think both climate change and habitat loss/damage), wasting food just accelerates that.
     
  17. Richie

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 7,592

    Location: Entering Hell...

    About 1/2 a loaf of bread goes in the bin once a week. That's really the only food waste I have.

    Meals are pretty planned and even if something does come up then, as I defrost things in the fridge, it will stay there for another day and still be fine. Even if it stayed a further day, I wouldn't throw it away pre-sniff check.

    Frozen chicken can be taken from freezer, into fridge and still be good by day 4 i.e. Freezer to fridge on Monday, still good to eat on Thursday perhaps even Friday.
     
  18. Bobmunkhouse

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2005

    Posts: 1,987

    This...
     
  19. robfosters

    Caporegime

    Joined: 1 Dec 2010

    Posts: 40,041

    Location: Welling, London

    Funnily enough I never waste bread, ever. Probably something to do with the fact that I eat toast by the bucketload. Just love it, loads of different spreads, marmite, Nutella, marmalade, curd, honey, peanut butter, jam, syrup, chutney, even nduja, the possibilities are endless.

    Sainsburys banoffee caramel spread is to die for
     
  20. One More Solo

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Dec 2004

    Posts: 16,175

    Location: Manchester

    Bread with marmite and bread with peanut butter = two distinct meals but you can’t eat sausages twice in a month?