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Environmental change - What can we do?

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Avenged7Fold, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. UTmaniac

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 9, 2005

    Posts: 4,723

    Location: Here

    Sainsburys have spent a small fortune on implementing "intelligent" self service tills in stores to reduce staff wage costs, yet they wrap identical nutrition items like baked beans and cola in needless plastic as multi-buy products... And then charge you less, encouraging you to act like them, not giving a stuff about the planet... Which is a horrid dilemma for those on tight budgets, save the environment or save the pennies. :(

    If only there was a way to make intelligent tills count six individual tins of beans and then give a discount due to bulk buying... :/
     
  2. satchef1

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 17, 2009

    Posts: 3,838

    They're not that interested in the environmental stuff right now. Like most retailers, they're under too much price pressure to make a stand, unless it's easy and it saves money.

    When it comes to the multipacks thing, unfortunately multipacks sell better even if you put the individual items on a multibuy. It isn't logical, but it's been tested to death. Most places only to mulitbuys now where they're looking to allow for variety (e.g. cans of soup).

    Similar story with packed fruit and veg. There's less wastage, so it makes financial sense to the retailer to do it.
     
  3. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 61,579

    EDIT: nm slightly off topic
     
  4. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 5,609

  5. Freakbro

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 29, 2010

    Posts: 14,466

    Location: Lincs

    That looks a brilliant invention
     
  6. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 5,609

    "Last week, the rollout of the Green New Deal brought sustained attention to the idea of high-speed rail in the United States for the first time since the early years of the Obama administration. Various Democratic presidential contenders endorsed, albeit in the vaguest possible terms, the idea of getting more people to more places via faster and more dependable train service. The office of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez went one further, suggesting—by mistake, apparently—that a souped-up rail system could replace domestic air travel.

    That was fancy. But reality wasn’t on the Democrats’ side either. On Tuesday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced he would be truncating the nation’s flagship public high-speed rail project, the train from Los Angeles to San Francisco, to run between…. Bakersfield and Merced. Driving that great strawberry patch takes just two-and-a-half hours.

    It’s a staggering step back from the plan as it was envisioned more than a decade ago, and feels like a blow to the idea that high-speed rail can meaningfully compete with air travel beyond the Northeast Corridor. It shouldn’t: High-speed rail is in fact eating into domestic airline industries from Italy to China, making travel easier, cheaper, faster, and cleaner. Modern, purpose-built high-speed rail has captured 90 percent of the market between Paris and Lyon (267 miles) and 85 percent of the market between Tokyo and Osaka (320 miles). Insert your favorite short-distance U.S. airline route here.

    A recent overview of research suggests that planes and high-speed trains are competitive on routes under 600 miles. Internationally, that includes routes like Rome-Milan, Tokyo-Osaka, and Paris-London. Domestically, it might include Atlanta-Charlotte, Los Angeles-Las Vegas, and yes, Los Angeles-San Francisco. Under 300 miles, rail becomes dominant. “Several regions in the United States have comparable density that might support the success of high-speed rail,” says Yu Zhang, one of the report’s authors. Park-and-ride, Uber and Lyft, trans-continental flights and short-haul, low-ridership airplane shuttles should all be viewed as complements to new high-speed rail, which is often linked to airports as well as city centers." https://slate.com/business/2019/02/...-work-in-america-but-were-screwing-it-up.html
     
  7. PlacidCasual

    Soldato

    Joined: May 13, 2003

    Posts: 5,728

    Absolutely no reason why electrodynamic suspension Maglev couldn't be eating into short to medium distance air travel it would be a damn site more energy efficient, high capital infrastructure costs will be the main hurdle.
     
  8. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 5,609

    Who said that a runaway greenhouse effect is unlikely?

    A state-of-the-art supercomputer simulation indicates that a feedback loop between global warming and cloud loss can push Earth’s climate past a disastrous tipping point in as little as a century. https://www.quantamagazine.org/cloud-loss-could-add-8-degrees-to-global-warming-20190225/
     
  9. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 61,579

    I don't understand why more effort isn't made on those lines both for medium range transport and stuff like https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StarTram
     
  10. jimjamuk

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 30, 2007

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    Location: Bristol, UK

  11. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 18,112

    Old money, estates, corruption. Rewilding the Caledonian forest would be immensely beneficial, the highlands isn’t a natural phenomenon. It’s emptiness is entirely manmade.

    Regardless it doesn’t mean a great deal, replanting the world isn’t going to change much, it’ll help, but only temporarily and only if the whole world was doing it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  12. Avenged7Fold

    Capodecina

    Joined: Sep 12, 2012

    Posts: 11,568

    Location: Surrey

    It would help massively with the current mass extinction in insect life we are seeing. It isn't a cure all and it certainly won't change things if that is the only thing we are doing but certainly worth it.
     
  13. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 5,609

    Solar evaporator offers a fresh route to fresh water https://phys.org/news/2019-04-solar-evaporator-fresh-route.html

     
  14. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

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    Posts: 5,609

    http://www.worldometers.info/

    https://www.co2.earth/
     
  15. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

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    Posts: 5,609

     
  16. Orionaut

    Soldato

    Joined: Aug 2, 2012

    Posts: 6,523

    How much of this is because of security concerns. Aircraft have been considered vulnerable to terrorism for a long time and while flying is technically cheap and fast, much of the delays and expense on air journeys are down to the security surrounding the airports and boarding checks.

    Thing I have always wondered, is how long will it be before high-speed trains will find themselves a similar target for bombers and hijackers and the advantage of high speed ground travel is lost because similar security will end up having to be applied at train stations
     
  17. Dolph

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 46,406

    Location: Plymouth

    Look at the cost, time and objection to any major infrastructure project in the UK, usually led by the same people who claim to want to protect the environment and the reason becomes clear.

    We have a planning system that is held hostage by a tiny minority of vested interest people, often working against their own interests, and as such we have lost the ability to build any major new infrastructure, let alone innovative infrastructure.
     
  18. stuman

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Aug 27, 2003

    Posts: 1,416

    I would suggest scrapping incentivising of bringing children into the world and instead offer tax breaks to people who don’t have children. The world needs less people.

    Also we need to curb our desire for the cheapest products at any costs. It’s a big reason I still buy Apple products.