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First 3D printer - up to 2k ish

Discussion in 'Printers' started by 413x, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. 413x

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 13, 2010

    Posts: 13,837

    Location: Stamford

    Going to actually buy one this month.
    Very difficult to decide what to get.
    Never used anything like it either as I guess is the case for many.

    Not important
    Noise,
    Open/closed

    Ideal
    Wireless/Ethernet rather than USB
    Dual extruder would be nice but probably not worth it as a first go

    Important
    Resolution - 100microns or better
    Relatively large print area - just for future flexibility
    Quaility of print
    Ease of use

    One thing I'd like some help on is software and what to expect. Do you get something fairly usable or do you need to purchase something?

    Materials too, not sure on pros and cons etc but not too brittle, cheap per Kg, easy to use

    Budget - 2k If pushed

    Only really looked at guides
     
  2. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    What do you plan on printing?

    My first bit of advice, don't spend any where near 2k on your first printer. Buy a cheaper one, experience the struggles, learn how to print and then if your still interested mod the **** out of it and get better prints.

    But to answer your points,

    • Wireless/Ethernet rather than USB: SD card OK or do you want a web interface?
    • Dual extruder: Isn't worth it at this stage and buy the time you want to look into it, 3 or even 4 extruders will be the route to go.
    • 0.1mm resolution: Is pointless in most FDM prints, 0.2 or 0.3 is just fine. (If you want 0.1 or less then is FDM right for you?)
    • Big print area: How big are we talking? I have printers from 80x80x80mm upto 250x250x250mm.
    • Quaility of print: How do you judge it?
    • Ease of use: That will come with using a printer, but if a printer is setup correctly once it's printing it's easy, but even an expensive printer needs setting up.
    One thing I'd like some help on is software and what to expect. Do you get something fairly usable or do you need to purchase something? Again comes with experience there are free and paid software packages, to start with free will be fine something like Cura or Repetier-Host.

    Materials too, not sure on pros and cons etc but not too brittle, cheap per Kg, easy to use: It will basically come down to PLA or ABS to start with and out of those PLA will be what you use most. Price can range from £15 to £30 per Kg.

    Got any questions let me no.

    J
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  3. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 17,739

    Location: Solihull-Florida

  4. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    Still looking then or....?
     
  5. 413x

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 13, 2010

    Posts: 13,837

    Location: Stamford

    Yes I am. I'm not sure of the D - bot. I don't think I want to mess around with building and sourcing etc. I think I'd rather just buy something

    Still struggling to decide,but absolutely want to get one now. I'm selling some dslr kit I don't use to fund it
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2017
  6. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 17,739

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    Then you left using a proprietary 3D printer, which is not good.

    As for the D-Bot getting the parts was easy. How about this one https://zmorph3d.com/frontpage
    It can do everything.....for a price.
     
  7. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    Well if you read my first reply and come back with some more info I might be able to help.

    J.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2017
  8. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    Whats wrong with something other than a D-bot? Didn't you sell yours?
     
  9. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 17,739

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    I've still got it. He didn't want to build one, so the only one I would go for is the Zmorph.
     
  10. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    At what point did he say he wants a multi tool machine?

    For what has been asked for you have much better choices including Prusa, Printrbot, ultimaker, Robo3D or even XYYZ.
     
  11. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 17,739

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    He didn't ask for a multi one. But the option is there if anyone wants to do everything including 3D printing food ;)
    As for the others I would chose the D-Bot every time.
     
  12. 413x

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 13, 2010

    Posts: 13,837

    Location: Stamford

    Thanks for the lively debate.

    I don't mind building the D-bot. If it's better than all the rest near this price point. What I don't want is to spend ages finding all the parts and ordering the wrong one!
    I've yet to see a simple basic set of parts for example

    If there is a hard parts list and build instructions that's fine.

    3d food printing is of interest but I would future.
    I've been told (personally) that its a big up and coming thing. But getting to grips with basics is more important St this stage
     
  13. Uncle Petey

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 22, 2012

    Posts: 13,631

    Location: London

    With your budget, you could build yourself a super slick, all the bells and whistles D-Bot and still have plenty left over. If you enjoy the satisfaction of building your own, then it'd be a great project and a fantastic learning experience.
    There is a basic parts list linked in the OP of the D-Bot thread here. However, you'd probably be better off looking through the 'made' and 'remix' tabs on the Thingiverse page and going from there, as people have done some pretty cool stuff.

    To be perfectly honest, while the D-Bot is cool and all, you'll likely save yourself a fair bit of ballache by buying a good ready made machine IMO. You might end up spending more money on a pre-built, but you'll be up and running a lot quicker and won't have to spend the time figuring out exactly what you want to build and sourcing bits etc...

    I can't recommend anything, as I haven't been keeping up with new machines, but I'm sure we could narrow it down if you got back to bulb66's questions in post #2 :)
    Figuring out what kind of build volume you'll want is probably the first thing to do.
     
  14. 413x

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 13, 2010

    Posts: 13,837

    Location: Stamford

    Especially as I'm sort of person who fusses over details. So yeah off the shelf is better.

    Ideally I want a large ish volume. Mainly as I only have an idea of what I want to print. I've seen 25cm cube is a common measurement and I can't see needing more than that. But I would like at least one side to be that big. Mainly as I do not want to come to a brick wall on that one.

    Resolution/quality
    It's hard to gauge. I can't see needing 0.1.
    But I would like to be able to sell. Ideas if I have any good ones. Just as a hobby. So quality needs to be decent.

    To give you an idea I am initially thinking of printing hollow geometric shapes. Like a hexagonal prism.

    I have zero idea of quality but if I printed a a 20cm *5cm*5cm solid hexagonal prism I'd want it to be fairly good. How to describe quality beyond this is tough.

    Material
    Again without knowing what they are like I'd like a material that is kind of like perspex is. Holds its shape when fairly thin but can let's say drill into it without it shattering.

    Software..
    Haven't a clue as never used it. So I'll have to leave that to you guys who know.
     
  15. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 17,739

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    I think you need to read up more or watch some you tube. You could even go to https://www.3dhubs.com and get someone local to print something for you.
    Then you will know what printer you want. If your buying off the self then get ready to bend over and take it as a proprietary 3D printer
    will cost more in the long run.

    But lets us all know which one you end up with. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCb8Rde3uRL1ohROUVg46h1A
     
  16. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    Why?
     
  17. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    OK So my honest suggestion, buy a cheap printer first see if you like it, make use of it and also learn about 3D printing and how to adjust hardware/software.

    If it is something you want to go further with you'll probably not see a great deal of improvement buying a 2k printer over a <£500 printer. What your paying for in a more expensive printer is manufacture support which is often long winded and largely all ready available in the community.

    Build volume Shouldn't a problem. There are a few printers with large build sizes.

    Resolution/quality Any well tuned/square printer will print at .01, so again not a problem. And if you buy a cheaper printer first, this can be upgrade for very little money and give you excellent prints. My highly modified Printrbot Metal Plus will produce excellent prints, because of it's hardware and software combination.

    Material I think you need to have a look into filaments and understand what is available and how 3d printers put down the plastic, layer splitting is a possibility if you start drilling into it, a hole designed into the model is a better option.

    Software Nothing wrong with either Cura or RepetierHost both free, as for designing things Fusion360 is OK if you can find a hobbyist download link (Free for hobby use)

    So a few examples of what to buy <£500

    Creality 3D CR-10 (multiable build size available 300x300x400 min, Heated bed) £500
    Wanhao i3 Plus (200x200x180, Heated bed) £380-500

    Now if you want to spend more on a printer I would look at these, but they will have wait times and potential import costs.

    Printrbot Metal Plus (254x254x254, heated bed, solidly build and good hardward) £1200
    Original Prusa i3 MK2S kit (250x210x200, heated bed with PEI, excellent hardware and software) 6 WEEK LEAD TIME £700
    Ultimaker 2 (230x230x210, Heat glass bed, SD-Card / WiFi, uses 3mm filament) £1800


    So I hope that helps.

    J.
     
  18. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 17, 2007

    Posts: 17,739

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    You don't know why? proprietary 3D printers cost more for parts then a normal CoreXY printers.
    I should know, because I had one. Total rip-off.
     
  19. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    You had a very closed source printer, that the manufacture didn't want people to mess with but more and more printers are now open source. All my printers are "off the shelf" but nearly all of them can or have been upgraded or fixed with non proprietary hardware.

    Didn't you add an E3D hotend to your davinci or at least look in to it? Meaning you didn't have to spend more money on proprietary parts.

    I'm not saying a D-Bot or any other DIY printer isn't cheaper (Depending if you want to add a load of non necessary parts that is), but it's certainly not easier or better than an off the shelf machine.

    J.
     
  20. bulb66

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 12, 2005

    Posts: 1,316

    Location: Suffolk

    Anyway.

    Someone asked about getting a 3d printer and I've given my advice. I've tried to give a wide choice of machines, they all have the pros and cons.

    J.
     


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