Gym in upstairs of house

Soldato
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Hi all, currently got my home gym downstairs which mainly consists of a rack and plates, bars and dumbbells but there is more room so am thinking of putting it upstairs. Have thick gym mats too.

After speaking to a neighbour, he's advised me not to do it due to the weight. Apparently when he had his house tiled, the tiler even recommended extra support due to the weight of the 500x500 porcelain tiles. We have them in our bathrooms and was told nothing of the sort. Apparently 3 different tiles told him this. Based on this information, he thinks having the gym upstairs is a risky move.

It's a brand new house made by persimmon homes. Surely it will be fine? The room currently has two desks, a wardrobe and cupboard and loads of crap in there which weighs a fair bit.

Thanks,

Andy
 
Caporegime
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Is the neighbour sure it's to do with the weight, or was it more specifically the flex? Big files need a solid, non flex base or they have a higher tendency to snap.
 
Soldato
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Is the neighbour sure it's to do with the weight, or was it more specifically the flex? Big files need a solid, non flex base or they have a higher tendency to snap.

Big tiles =Flex issues

Half a dozen decent sized blokes will weigh half a ton. If a room cant take that there is something seriously wrong with the structure.

A home Gym wont come anywhere near that.

(What is the current building regs for floor loadings on new builds? There must be a specification)
 
Soldato
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Depends what you mean my a gym mate... running machine, rowing machine and a cross trainer no probs. However I'd def get a structural engineer round if you're planning on weights.

Floors are strengthened under baths for a reason, and that's a static weight.... just use your head and imagine what a PB dead lift banging back down on built to cost wooden floor is going to do.

Another consideration is the distribution of the weight most racks/equipment have rather small contact patches with the floor so you are concentrating that weight. Then there's joist direction, internal or external supporting walls etc. Pay for a structural engineer IMO, I wouldn't feel safe with my family sitting under hundreds of kilos of potential energy without certainty it won't end up giving way.
 
Man of Honour
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Point loading and shocks from anything being dropped are going to be the issues.

While a room may be able to handle half a ton of people they're not going to be all loaded onto a tiny patch of the available space like a rack or plates on a bar will be.
 
Soldato
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(What is the current building regs for floor loadings on new builds? There must be a specification)

Part A says not exceeding 1.5kN/m2 so approx 150kg/m2

I wouldn't put a running machine on anything but a concrete floor unless you want to see your ceiling come down
 
Caporegime
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Big tiles =Flex issues

Half a dozen decent sized blokes will weigh half a ton. If a room cant take that there is something seriously wrong with the structure.

A home Gym wont come anywhere near that.

(What is the current building regs for floor loadings on new builds? There must be a specification)

half a ton is nothing compared to a proper home gym setup and would it all be concentrated in 1 area with half a dozen people and would all those people be jumping up and down within the 1 concentrated area?

home gyms are best kept in garages, ground floors/basements and/or outhouses.

there is no way i would put a proper weights setup consisting of a rack and olympic weights upstairs
 
Soldato
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Surely it will be fine?

Try it and let us know how you get on! ;)

Loam has listed the domestic loadings and the stuff you're listing is heavy point loadings so depending on where any loadbearing partitions are (if any) you could be ok but I wouldn't like to risk it.

New build houses are designed to get the maximum use out of minimal materials so anything in excess of this you will be putting the structure under unnecessary stress.
 
Soldato
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get a structural engineer in to look into this for you
be safe

This or keep it downstairs.

The nature of a dynamic load means that an 80KG being, lowering 150-200KG of bar & plates means you're concentrating in excess of 350-400KG through the patch alone which your feet are stood on.

Even if you reinforced the floor area stood on new builds aren't built like houses in the 18-1900's and this stress will just be spread further afield. Being 'New' doesn't mean it's better suited.

For what it's worth I too have a new build (2011) and having seen it during the build process wouldn't dream of doing what you propose. And yes I had a cage, plates & bars. All in my garage with a concrete base and heavy duty 18mm matting.
 
Soldato
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Modern floor joists:

FzC7BH9.jpg


I'd keep it downstairs
 
Soldato
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There is not a chance I would consider deadlifting in an upstairs floor of a house. I'd even avoid downstairs floors of a house with suspended flooring tbh.

Let us know how it goes though OP!
 
Associate
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Suppose it depends on your joists etc.

Had my gym upstairs for the last 2-3 years with no issues, just do deadlifts in the garden.

Ironmaster dumbells (around 70kg)
CF475 Rack with lat attachment
2 benches
185kg in plates
37.5kg in bars

I have ply (IIRC 22mm) laid the opposite way of the chipboard then the matting on top of these joists:

b4j5om.jpg


Tacky wallpaper courtesy of previous owners.

347wtvm.jpg


I've not had any issues with the ceiling below although I wouldn't put anymore weight in there. It's not ideal as having to do deadlifts in the back garden is a pain and a spare room would be nice so having an extension built so it can go on the ground floor.
 
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Man of Honour
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nice setup :) ^^^^ why not join a gym and enjoy the views? lol

What views? My gym is full of half dead sweating like they've just got out of the shower old Indian guys :p and if you're really lucky you get to see them using the balldr...sorry hairdryer :(
 
Associate
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nice setup :) ^^^^ why not join a gym and enjoy the views? lol

Thanks, never had a gym membership started with a pair of twist lock dumbells from argos lol then got hooked and within a 2 months invested in the rest. A lot more convenient for me, I can train in the same time it would take me to drive to and from the nearest gym. Also got a Concept2 for cardio but not enough room for it in there so it's in the living room :D.
 
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Soldato
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What views? My gym is full of half dead sweating like they've just got out of the shower old Indian guys :p and if you're really lucky you get to see them using the balldr...sorry hairdryer :(


Ornithology my friend the study of birds fit ones at that lol


Thanks, never had a gym membership started with a pair of twist lock dumbells from argos lol then got hooked and within a 2 months invested in the rest. A lot more convenient for me, I can train in the same time it would take me to drive to and from the nearest gym. Also got a Concept2 for cardio but not enough room for it in there so it's in the living room :D.

meh I prefer the gym - only at the right times though
 
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