Hardwiring Car Accessories- Help a complete newb out

Soldato
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9 Jul 2003
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Hey

I'm planning on hardwiring my PDA charger into my MX-5 (mk2) so the cigerette socket is free, but I'm not sure where the best place to wire it into is. :o

Initially I was going to take it from the cig socket, but I don't know how to get to it and someone else mentioned that I could take it from the car stereo which would be a lot easier.

So can I take it from the stereo easily, or would I be better of finding a way to get to the cig socket wires?

All I need to do is just wire my dual cig adapter in, run it around to the glovebox and then have the charger plugged into that.
But I doubt it will be that easy, and this is the first time I've attempted messing with the car electrics so any advice would be great.

Cheers
Steve
 
Caporegime
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Easy peasy since i've done this myself :)

To pull out the cig lighter socket you need to twist it around till the cutout lines up with the cig lighter retainer clips, then pull it out, takes a little tug but it will come out.

You will have two wires on the back, yellow is + and black is -

use some of those wiring clips (can't remember the names) that you can snap over the cable and means you don't have to cut it.

Tidy up, route wires for charger behind dash then clip it all back together :)
 
Soldato
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Please don't use Scotchlocks if thats what you have. They are rubbish and dangerous as they come undone frequently and cause short circuits.
Strip the wire, solder new wire on and use copious amounts of electrical tape.
 
Caporegime
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emailiscrap said:
Please don't use Scotchlocks if thats what you have. They are rubbish and dangerous as they come undone frequently and cause short circuits.
Strip the wire, solder new wire on and use copious amounts of electrical tape.

How can a scotchlock come loose if installed proper, a soldered connection is more likely to vibrate loose in a high stress situation, i mean a scotchlock is A) Pressed over hard. B) Clamp over so clip cant come apart then i electrical tape over mine so they can't short.
 
Soldato
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Firestar_3x said:
a soldered connection is more likely to vibrate loose in a high stress situation,

How crap's your soldering :p

Soldered joints will always be more secure, and if you can solder vaguely well, I'd go for that option.
 
Soldato
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Didn't get a chance to do it today after all, but hopefully I'll get it done tomorrow.

I was thinking about it though, and wondering if I should put an inline fuse on the cable?

All the devices have a fuse anyway, but if it's worth doing I'll try to get one tomorrow.
 
Permabanned
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If the cable run is long i.e greater than a metre and/or the maximum amperage rating of the cigarette adaptor is more than that of the supply then I'd add a small fuse as close to the connection join as I could.

If you tap from the cigarette line, which I believe is usually fused at 10A, I wouldn't worry too much about adding another fuse.

It won't do any harm to add one though of course .

Oh and to answer your question, the 'proper' way and the way I'd do it would be to run from the cigarette connection. There is no technical reason why you shouldn't run from the HU line though.
 
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Caporegime
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andi said:
How ****** your soldering :p

Soldered joints will always be more secure, and if you can solder vaguely well, I'd go for that option.


Very good, however answer me this, why are all electrical connections in the car either using crimps or plugs even when they don't have to, Also you have the situation of some wire you can't solder, i've been going through this at some length with the hardcore track going mx5 boys and crimping is the way forward i'm affraid :)
 
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Soldato
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I think the difference between using solder and crimps and then covering with electrical tape is very very small.

When I fitted the aftermarket alarm in my car, I originally used solder and electrical tape. After reading several things on the Internet about crimps, I bought a bulk pack and went about re-doing all of the connections with crimps and electrical tape... it was so awkward to get a crimp tool into some of the spaces, and I'm not convinced that crimps are as secure as everyone makes out... probably not a problem when using electrical tape.

Same goes for solder, if soldered properly and then coated with electrical tape, the solder isn't going to snap or break. I'm going to do my gauges install with solder and electrical tape.
 
Caporegime
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agw_01 said:
I think the difference between using solder and crimps and then covering with electrical tape is very very small.

When I fitted the aftermarket alarm in my car, I originally used solder and electrical tape. After reading several things on the Internet about crimps, I bought a bulk pack and went about re-doing all of the connections with crimps and electrical tape... it was so awkward to get a crimp tool into some of the spaces, and I'm not convinced that crimps are as secure as everyone makes out... probably not a problem when using electrical tape.

Same goes for solder, if soldered properly and then coated with electrical tape, the solder isn't going to snap or break. I'm going to do my gauges install with solder and electrical tape.

I suppose on balance its much of a muchness, ultimate would be to solder then crimp around, heatshrink then tape :p

On a side note gauge wiring is easy, wire gauge up out of car, feed wires through then connect up, or thats what i did :)
 
Soldato
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Firestar_3x said:
I suppose on balance its much of a muchness, ultimate would be to solder then crimp around, heatshrink then tape :p

On a side note gauge wiring is easy, wire gauge up out of car, feed wires through then connect up, or thats what i did :)

Heh, you'd need some rather large crimps to fit around some solder ;)

And yeah, that's why my centre console flaps around... I've not bothered to screw it back in, so that I can take it out when the gauges go in :)
 
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