I need to post a drill battery back to Makita

Soldato
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As per subject, one of my drill batteries has died prematurely and Makita have said they'll take a look at it if I post it back to them.

Is it right that Royal Mail and most other couriers won't allow lithium-ion batteries being posted alone?
 
Soldato
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10 Aug 2006
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I've posted camera batterys which are Li-Ion with royal mail, i think as long as they are not in the device it's ok, but they wont post if it is, unless it's a phone.

Taken from Rotal mail weeby.

Each package must contain no more than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment. The maximum net quantity of cells or batteries is 5kg per package. Watt-hour rating must not exceed 20Wh per cell or 100Wh per battery. Each cell and battery must be of a type proven to meet the requirements of each test in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, Section 38.3. Batteries are subject to these tests irrespective of whether the cells of which they are composed have been so tested.

Cells and batteries must be manufactured under a quality management programme as specified in the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air. Cells or batteries that are defective for safety reasons, or that have been damaged, are forbidden. Any person preparing or offering cells or batteries with or in equipment for transport must receive adequate instruction on the requirements commensurate with their responsibilities. Cells and batteries must be protected against short circuit.

The equipment containing cells or batteries must be packed in strong rigid packaging and must be secured against movement within the outer packaging and packed to prevent accidental activation. The sender’s name and return address must be clearly visible on the outer packaging.
These items must be presented at a Post Office counter.

Lithium ion/polymer batteries sent in isolation are prohibited.
Read more at http://www.postoffice.co.uk/mail/uk-what-can-i-send#tJ4JPg19WrkpuyQr.99
 
Associate
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On the royal mail website there are a set of guidelines for posting lithium batters and products which contain them. Basically you have to package them in a specific way and their is a special label to print and go on the parcel.
 
Associate
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I have sent back high powered lithium-ion batteries in the past.
You just need to put a sticker on the outside of the box the post office will have them.
Google 'lithium-ion batteries sticker'
 

HAz

HAz

Soldato
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Torquay Devon
I received a battery for a mobile phone which was faulty. It came by Royal Mail but the post office said I couldn't send it back lol
 
Associate
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Don't even get me started on this, I had a lengthy discussion with a man in a post office that ended with him refusing to post my Dewalt battery. Having thoroughly read the royal mail rules I would consider a drill battery to be a battery pack so would consider it to be battery cells within an electronic device which is permitted to send. The battery pack is cells contained within a very tough casing that is protected against shorts etc and has a battery tester built in. I would consider that an electronic device rather than a loose battery. Royals mails solution was to ask me to post the drill with it. Mine was to leave and get my brother to post it for me later that day!

Dave
 
Associate
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Loughborough
Tried sending a laptop battery a few weeks back through Royal Mail...

Got a card from them in the post saying they had destroyed it.
 
Man of Honour
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They aren't the Royal mails rules. Hence why all couriers have the same rules...

Exactly, they are ADR rules which apply to all couriers or transport companies. Lithium Ion batteries (broadly speaking) fall under UN3480 which means they have been classified by the United Nations as dangerous goods, therefore to move them by road in the UK means they have to comply with ADR rulings.
 
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