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i5 sandybridge or hold out for later revision ivybrige

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Hi , was wondering what the opinion on this would be since the angle im covering i dont think has been covered in these forums .

I purchased a z77 ud5 yesterday , so im looking forward to getting it , though i have no CPU yet , as im running 1xi5 750 1156 , and 775 q6600 ddr3 and celeron 2.4 ghz ddr2 at home .

Im tempted to hit the button for an i5 next time a good price comes on the daily deals and its tempting not to wait , but so far i have resisted
However the issue is this , when ivybridge is released the difference will be minimal , Though looking at previous releases of cpu"s the first revision is quite slower to the final later releases , which would have improved performance and overclocking , not to mention less buggier .
Do you think it would be wiser to look for a later revision , towards the end of 1155 life , like the difference between i5 2300 at 2.8 ghz to the 2500k later edition . Would we expect to see similar differences with ivybridge , and just pick up a cheap sandybridge tried and tested in the meantime ?
 
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I also just purchased an asus z77 board.

Current sandy bridge processors will drop in price on the release of ivy bridge, so I'm waiting until then to decide.

Do intel ever release new revisions of processors when they are essentially just a die shrink??

Sorry, kind of turned your question into another question :(
 
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I also just purchased an asus z77 board.

Current sandy bridge processors will drop in price on the release of ivy bridge, so I'm waiting until then to decide.

Do intel ever release new revisions of processors when they are essentially just a die shrink??

Sorry, kind of turned your question into another question :(

this is the question , are there likely to be down the line further ivybridge , i5, and i7 releases , with prob higher standard clock speeds and ironed out issues if any , with the first batch or will this release be it .
I know its just speculation at the moment , but if you was to buy a new ivybridge on release , your be kicking yourself in a few months down the line , if new versions come out with improvements based on things that surface on the first models . perhaps it is best to go with the tried and tested sandybrige offerings , until ivy is bedded in , especially if the price falls .
 
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Based on whats currently known about ivy bridge it wont matter much.

Ivy brings:

- Better IGP
- Improved power savings under load, idles dont change much

Plus intel rarely drop prices on their old stuff, it just sits around until it all eventually leaves the channel, you may get a good deal on used chips though but dont expect retail prices on sandy bridge to drop much. Nehalem chips i7 9xx's are still full retail price in the few places that carry them.

If you arent in a rush then might as well wait, if you want something new now then buy it now.
 
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If you have a system that will get you by for a few weeks then personally I would wait for Ivy Bridge, as you will get a slightly faster, slightly more efficient CPU with a faster onboard GPU for almost the same price as a Sandy Bridge (plus PCIE gen3 works with these CPUs). However, If you need a new system now then go right ahead and buy a sandy bridge, no point suffering for a few weeks for the newer CPU.

As Max mentions, when intel release a new CPU generation the prices of the old chips don't drop immediately - it usually takes months for it to happen and by then they aren't usually a good investment.

As for later revisions of Ivy Bridge, if we look at Intels previous two mainstream platforms (s1156 nahalem and s1155 sandy bridge) each of these only came out with a singe version (no mid-life revision) as the gap between the releases was relatively short. Therefore, if you bought a good CPU on the day the platform was released (ie a i5 750 when LGA1156 was released or an i5 2500K when LGA1155 was released) then a considerably better CPU at the same price point only arrives when the next generation rolls in, the only mid-life additions are minor changes (like the i5 760 or i5 2550K) which are not worth upgrading to or waiting for if you already have the launch CPU.

Therefore, based on the previous track record of intel it would make sense to assume that the LGA1155 Ivy Bridge CPUs will have no mid-life revision (assuming their is no flaw found after release) and better options at a similar price will only turn up when the next generation (Haswell) arrives.
 
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Thanks all .
So the opinion is this ivybridge later this month will be it , so the focus is deciding should not need extending to that factor , and most likely be straight choice i5 2500k or this upcoming ivybridge editions .
I guess ill take the leap of faith n wait , Though there issues it might not clock as high , remains to be seen , but the bottom line is performance and im of the opinion that that will not be lesser than sandybridge , even with slightly slower clock for clock , and still in most cases perform a little better , with better graphics should be good enough for day to day use for browsing , bits n bobs , and give the 6970 a rest except for gaming , and save a fortune in electricity .
 
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I rather think the problem is that one can always wait for the next greatest version to come along and thus never actually upgrade at all. I have been waiting a while for the Ivy Bridge line to arrive and will buy one when they do arrive. However, I'm not sure I will wait until the autumn so I will have to see when things arrive in the shops. June is mooted as the time but who knows =when stocks will be there for purchase....
 
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10-15% boost in performance (or max overclocks) is surely worth 3 weeks wait. Unless you really need now. I know im waiting!
 
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What are we looking at price wise do you reckon for ivy? I can get a new SB for £158 which is tempting me alot and i know it will do everything i need
 
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Supposedly the i5 3570K is going to cost $225 wholesale. This compares to the $215 wholesale price of the i5 2500K.

Once it gets over to the UK I reckon we will be looking at a £10 price premium for this new CPU over the 2500K.
 
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Supposedly the i5 3570K is going to cost $225 wholesale. This compares to the $215 wholesale price of the i5 2500K.

Once it gets over to the UK I reckon we will be looking at a £10 price premium for this new CPU over the 2500K.

So the i5 3570K is the replacement for i5 2500K?

Just so I know what to buy at the time, it sure is getting confusing.
 
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Yes, the i5 3570K is the replacement for the 2500K.

The 3570K has a default clockspeed of 3.4GHz, four physical cores, Ivy Bridge 22nm microarchitecture, no hyperthreading, an unlocked multiplier, a 77W TDP, 6MB L3 cache and a HD 4000 onboard graphics core.

Basically a slightly quicker, less power hungry 2500K (fingers crossed for good overclocking performance).
 
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Yes, the i5 3570K is the replacement for the 2500K.

The 3570K has a default clockspeed of 3.4GHz, four physical cores, Ivy Bridge 22nm microarchitecture, no hyperthreading, an unlocked multiplier, a 77W TDP, 6MB L3 cache and a HD 4000 onboard graphics core.

Basically a slightly quicker, less power hungry 2500K (fingers crossed for good overclocking performance).

Thanks for clearing that up:)

Just got to resist the urge if a 2500K coming up cheap in the MM while I wait.
 
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If you're always waiting for something newer and better,
you'll never buy anything.

Even IF there's a later revision of ivybridge, the first release is still on par / an improvement on SB, so your current choice is SB or a few weeks for a little better.
 
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I've decided to wait before deciding on Z77 / Z68 and Ivy / Sandy setup to replace what's in my sig. It's not much fun waiting but nearly there!
 
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