Install new motherboard without a fresh Windows 7 install?

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Have yet to buy the motherboard. It's an FM2 socket. Just looking for a slightly better board due to the terrible location of the SATA ports on the current one.
 
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Not had a problem doing this in the past, just install the new chipset drivers and so on and you're good.

Probably not the cleanest way of doing things though.
 

RHS

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Chances are you won't have to re-install provided really on the basis that the chipset is the same.

In any case I would recommend a backup of any data that you cannot afford to loose in case you do need to reinstall windows.

If it was me I would probably do a clean install anyway as a good opportunity to do some housekeeping.
 
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It can be done but there are certain factors that will make it easier.

I moved from my old Q9400 (P45 chipset) setup to a new Haswell (Z87 chipset) setup but this is how I did it (having a new SSD helps as well):
- Cloned my old 64GB SSD which was Windows 7 onto my new 256GB SSD using Macrium Reflect Free (my 64GB SSD was a backup in case I lost everthing ;))
- Built the machine with all parts, etc then proceeded to turn it on.
- Booted into Safe Mode within Windows 7 (pressing F8).
- Z87 chipset can easily run off basic Microsoft Intel drivers so I uninstall all old versions of Intel chipset software, network drivers, etc.
- Installed latest version of drivers for Z87 board.
- Rebooted and it went through fine.

The advantage is that all Intel based motherboards can use the common basic driver to function, the chipset updates are just really tweaks to improve performance and compatibility most of the time.
 
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Not had a problem doing this in the past, just install the new chipset drivers and so on and you're good.

Probably not the cleanest way of doing things though.

This ...

Although not recommended. You don't know how much stuff is going to be lying around in your registry that's extraneous.
 
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The only thing I would advise is going into device manager and switching the SATA controller drivers to the basic microsoft ones.

If you have time you can switch all the proprietary drivers over to the Microsoft ones.

Make sure it reboots with the microsoft drivers and then do the mobo swap.
 
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Try windows utility called "sysprep" . It is designed to enable you to do exactly what you are asking . But be careful , save all personal files coz it deletes all personal files as part of its process . Otherwise it works a treat .
 
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When replacing hardware like a motherboard it would be recommended to proceed with a clean install. Alternatively, you could use the Sysprep utility like 916Mick suggested which will assist with creating an image of your current system. Prior to using sysprep, it is first best to fully understand what sysprep is, what its purpose is for and how it works. As it states in the ‘What is Sysprep?’ document above, Sysprep, by default, removes system-specific information and not necessarily your personal data. Still, it is always recommended to make routine backups of your important information just to be on the safe side.

In your case, you could run the sysprep /generalize command which should leave your user account intact and then use a utility such as ImageX to capture an image of your system prior to replacing the motherboard. You will want to store the captured image which will be in WIM file format to a network attached storage device or an external hard drive. After replacing the motherboard, you could then restore the image to your system and allow Windows to boot up and detect the new hardware.

You also might want to watch the Preparing an Image Using Sysprep and ImageX from the Springboard Series on TechNet.

Keep us posted!

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
 
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Clean install all the way. Hardly takes ages these days and a nice fresh system is great. It can often take longer to fix annoying problems than just to build from the ground up.

^ Also, Windows outreach team? Not doing much reaching out, 17 posts since Dec '11... not even one post per month :p
 
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When replacing hardware like a motherboard it would be recommended to proceed with a clean install. Alternatively, you could use the Sysprep utility like 916Mick suggested which will assist with creating an image of your current system. Prior to using sysprep, it is first best to fully understand what sysprep is, what its purpose is for and how it works. As it states in the ‘What is Sysprep?’ document above, Sysprep, by default, removes system-specific information and not necessarily your personal data. Still, it is always recommended to make routine backups of your important information just to be on the safe side.

In your case, you could run the sysprep /generalize command which should leave your user account intact and then use a utility such as ImageX to capture an image of your system prior to replacing the motherboard. You will want to store the captured image which will be in WIM file format to a network attached storage device or an external hard drive. After replacing the motherboard, you could then restore the image to your system and allow Windows to boot up and detect the new hardware.

You also might want to watch the Preparing an Image Using Sysprep and ImageX from the Springboard Series on TechNet.

Keep us posted!

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

Will sysprep work for Windows 8 too? I'm replacing my motherboard next month and would like to avoid a fresh install (only been a couple of weeks since I installed Windows 8).
 
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Will sysprep work for Windows 8 too? I'm replacing my motherboard next month and would like to avoid a fresh install (only been a couple of weeks since I installed Windows 8).

Yes, Sysprep will work for Windows 8 as well. There is a Sysprep Preparation Technical Reference document specifically targeted for Windows 8 from the Springboard Series page on TechNet here that you might find helpful.

^ Also, Windows outreach team? Not doing much reaching out, 17 posts since Dec '11... not even one post per month

Also, this page on TechNet will explain a little bit more about myself and my team. We typically focus our outreach efforts on posts that are related to IT Pro and enterprise technologies. If there is any way I could help with any scenario discussed in this thread or others, please feel free to PM me directly.

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
 
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Also, this page on TechNet will explain a little bit more about myself and my team. We typically focus our outreach efforts on posts that are related to IT Pro and enterprise technologies. If there is any way I could help with any scenario discussed in this thread or others, please feel free to PM me directly.

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

Just a bit surprised to see Microsoft "reaching out" on forums tbh. As an "IT Pro" myself :)p) my only contact with MS has been with activation assistant telephone reps and quite frankly daft posters on MS forums who don't read questions you ask properly and copy/paste inappropriate "solutions". Fair play if you guys are upping your game, good to see!
 
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Yes, Sysprep will work for Windows 8 as well. There is a Sysprep Preparation Technical Reference document specifically targeted for Windows 8 from the Springboard Series page on TechNet here that you might find helpful.

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

Thanks Jessica, bookmarked that page to read more about it later (closer to the actual upgrade time).
 
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When replacing hardware like a motherboard it would be recommended to proceed with a clean install. Alternatively, you could use the Sysprep utility like 916Mick suggested which will assist with creating an image of your current system. Prior to using sysprep, it is first best to fully understand what sysprep is, what its purpose is for and how it works. As it states in the ‘What is Sysprep?’ document above, Sysprep, by default, removes system-specific information and not necessarily your personal data. Still, it is always recommended to make routine backups of your important information just to be on the safe side.

In your case, you could run the sysprep /generalize command which should leave your user account intact and then use a utility such as ImageX to capture an image of your system prior to replacing the motherboard. You will want to store the captured image which will be in WIM file format to a network attached storage device or an external hard drive. After replacing the motherboard, you could then restore the image to your system and allow Windows to boot up and detect the new hardware.

You also might want to watch the Preparing an Image Using Sysprep and ImageX from the Springboard Series on TechNet.

Keep us posted!

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

Hi Jessica. Isn't the last part a bit superfluous assuming nothing catastrophic has occured? It's nice to have the image backup but applying it after the succesful board transfer seems like taking a step back or am I missing something? It states that it captures and applies a full version of the OS and apps in the ImageX link provided.

-----------------

Anyhow to the OP, sysprep has worked for me several times without drama, the only caveat being personal user files (document, download folders, desktop shortcuts, pinned shortcuts etc basically users/*NAME* directory) cleared. Easy enough to copy and set up again. Installed software remains fine, reactivate and done. As per usual though a full image beforehand is always recomended just in case.
 
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Before (with no option to reinstall/emergency repair/recovery) I've had mixed success with resetting the Windows recovery hive's (basically resetting the registry) following through the 'Recover from a corrupted registry' MSKB - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307545

  • Basically get to the point of restoring all the 'repair' files.
  • Remove all drivers for controllers (SATA/PATA/USB) and any other hardware that's going to change.
  • Shut down and make hardware changes.
  • Boot up should be ok and install new drivers for new hardware.

Have moved from AMD to Intel doing that, but not since XP.

This might be useful: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/sm...placing-computers-much-easier/343?tag=nl.e230

Piece of software called 'Transwiz' is good for moving users between PC's but as for changing hardware then there's many good 'workarounds' but nothing beats a fresh install! Latest drivers on clean Windows install :D

I've used many tools before (like http://www.nliteos.com/ ) to slipstream service packs into install media (ISO's) to make reinstalls easier, but since Windows 7 (because the install is quite quick) I'm using a tool called 'WSUS Offline Update' (http://www.wsusoffline.net/).

Basically it's a downloader which enables you to Offline install all Windows Updates on any machine. It populates itself and updates itself from Microsoft's Servers and creates an install folder (put it on USB) then you run the installer on the new (vanilla) install and it'll patch the machine for you. Loads quicker than downloading from Windows Update, very few reboots and after the initial (big) download it takes the pain out of the huge-download-after-every-reinstall!

I use it at work - fresh windows install, WSUS update, Windows Update for a few others = baremetal to fully patched Windows install in about 2 hours (obviously much faster on SDD's!)
 
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