Insurance companies watch what addresses you 'try' on compare sites

Associate
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Rootkits can make you look like a fool due to just how genuine rootkits work if you ever find out and never underestimate rootkits, for me over time my pc system router have rootkit on it.

In my opinion rootkits are the way to go if you potentially want to rape a system or network unless you know how rootkits work and how to prevent them,

Read about root kits here > https://home.sophos.com/en-us/security-news/2019/what-is-a-rootkit.aspx and learn about them otherwise you may never know and works like quicksand because over time it can make your system be more vulnerable and the less you can do about it unless your a computer expert of all sorts.
 
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Soldato
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I always do the speculative quotes with a fake name, dob etc to avoid this. Real details when ready to buy.

The problem is this doesn't give you an accurate quote.

I posted a thread on here a few years ago about some other funny business. Where i was tweaking quotes, and not using my full name, although every other detail - address/employment/driving history was identical. When i eventually went through to purchase the quote, (and to just update my surname so that it was correct) the price shot up a little bit.
 
Associate
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The problem is this doesn't give you an accurate quote.

I posted a thread on here a few years ago about some other funny business. Where i was tweaking quotes, and not using my full name, although every other detail - address/employment/driving history was identical. When i eventually went through to purchase the quote, (and to just update my surname so that it was correct) the price shot up a little bit.

Yes because you've altered the same quote down the line which will result in a higher price, particularly if it's days later (or closed to the live date)

I use made up details then when I am happy, immediately run a new quote with the correct details so that it is saved ready to go. Never had an issue with price changing.
 
Soldato
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Yes because you've altered the same quote down the line which will result in a higher price, particularly if it's days later (or closed to the live date)

I use made up details then when I am happy, immediately run a new quote with the correct details so that it is saved ready to go. Never had an issue with price changing.

About 5 minutes later.

From what i basically got told, they run a credit check on your name, obviously with my fake surname there's no record of anything, but when using my real surname with real records (excellent credit rating i may add!) i had a completely different price.
 
Associate
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About 5 minutes later.

From what i basically got told, they run a credit check on your name, obviously with my fake surname there's no record of anything, but when using my real surname with real records (excellent credit rating i may add!) i had a completely different price.

Odd, also why does the credit check even impact if you quote to pay annually?
 
Soldato
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Odd, also why does the credit check even impact if you quote to pay annually?

That was the basis of my argument, i've always paid in full.

I suspect it was more to do with an identity verification check, but why the difference in price between person A with a fake name, and person B with a real name using identical details.

I'd be intrigued if someone else tries it.
 
Soldato
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They are just picking at the low hanging fruit.

It's data they have and is easy to check, gives them an excuse to make a call and query. Worked this time they got £60 for doing very little.

They will catch some insurance fraud I'd imagine but it's the easy calls and money they will prefer.
 
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Associate
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At least they asked you about it, Admiral just notified me they'd be debiting more money for my 'undeclared' modifications that I didn't actually have but had test quoted on a comparison site.

I learnt my lesson about test quoting with real details then.
Yep, Admiral did this to me twice. Once I just had a series of irritating phone calls to sort it (culminated in me asking them if they'd like to charge me for insurance on the 10 different cars I'd got quotes on and I think they saw sense), the second time I did a chargeback as they'd already promised to sort it and hadn't - they didn't like that very much. Haven't had any problems in the last 5 years or so though.
 
Soldato
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That was the basis of my argument, i've always paid in full.

I suspect it was more to do with an identity verification check, but why the difference in price between person A with a fake name, and person B with a real name using identical details.

I'd be intrigued if someone else tries it.

I've had the same experience. Did a load of quotes, using identical details, but fake name. Got a quote I was happy with, changed to the correct name, and it added about 20% to the quote.
 
Caporegime
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This may be common knowledge but it was a first for me.

I watched a recorded tech event last year from a company that sells anti fraud services to the insurance companies. This company have built an entire business out of calculating risk, detecting fraud etc.. and one of the things their service does is trawl through all of the quotes that get run, and proactively alert them when customers do stuff like this. The thought process being that people would run multiple quotes of different addresses they could use (parents, inlaws, grandparents etc..) and find the cheapest, then use that as the registered address. I was amazed at the depth their systems go to, and all the data they use.

Moral of the story is, this is big business, and you won't be doing your insurance any favours if when found doing it, you just try and ignore it. Moral of the story is, this stuff does happen, so if you want to play around within the rules, make sure you use a name that's not yours, an address in the same street that's not yours, and a car that's not yours to work out which job title, coverage, car etc.. gives you the best quote.

Fairly dangerous them doing this imo, if you don't like someone all you need to do is do loads of quotes in their name & reg number but with drink driving convictions, high risk mods. Could cause them a nightmare.

That is one downside that struck me while hearing "from the inside" what this company does. The potential to use the knowledge of the fact that people use this data, plus the ability of strangers to enter it at will anonymously (via VPN etc..) really struck me.

I'm expecting this to blow up at some point, and the process to be regulated.
 
Soldato
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I watched a recorded tech event last year from a company that sells anti fraud services to the insurance companies. This company have built an entire business out of calculating risk, detecting fraud etc.. and one of the things their service does is trawl through all of the quotes that get run, and proactively alert them when customers do stuff like this. The thought process being that people would run multiple quotes of different addresses they could use (parents, inlaws, grandparents etc..) and find the cheapest, then use that as the registered address. I was amazed at the depth their systems go to, and all the data they use.

Moral of the story is, this is big business, and you won't be doing your insurance any favours if when found doing it, you just try and ignore it. Moral of the story is, this stuff does happen, so if you want to play around within the rules, make sure you use a name that's not yours, an address in the same street that's not yours, and a car that's not yours to work out which job title, coverage, car etc.. gives you the best quote.



That is one downside that struck me while hearing "from the inside" what this company does. The potential to use the knowledge of the fact that people use this data, plus the ability of strangers to enter it at will anonymously (via VPN etc..) really struck me.

I'm expecting this to blow up at some point, and the process to be regulated.

It does seem all too big brother like.

Although as you say, i'm expecting it to blow up at some point. When you get people with common names (Jones/Smith etc) and living in common street names (High Street, Station Road etc), eventually someones going to be a bit confused when their insurance quote has rocketed because a) someones used their name to test the price difference of the same car with serious modifications or b) someones tested mileage differences and different job titles.

I can understand why insurance companies are doing it, but at the same time, their complex algorithm for calculating risk is what's leading people to try and "tweak" the quote to get the best possible price.

The one that i always have to laugh at - and is perfectly legal to tweak is job title. Working in the IT industry, there's about 7/8 job titles that i could use (and prove if ever called up on). The price range between those job titles was about £50 when i tried them in quotes a good number of years ago.
 
Soldato
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I knew they monitored it but never knew they acted upon it. Thanks for sharing.
 
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