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Labour propose to abolish fee paying schools

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by jsmoke, Nov 23, 2019.

  1. jsmoke

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2012

    Posts: 8,721

    Thought this was worthy of a thread. It's been on their cards for a while but I've only just read about it.

    This is their latest on it,

    I would have thought this would have pretty significant ramifications to the power structures we have. Fee paying school typify the class based system - privilege earns you power and money etc.

    Are they able to do this just at the push of a button so to speak, I would have thought it would be a major undertaking with a lot of resistance?

    Imagine all those toffs having to share airspace with commoners.

    On the other hand at least these schools breed highly competitive, through their arrogance and sense of superiority, people, which, ultimately if managed well I'm sure is a good thing for the economy and it's not as if the money distribution in this current at present is near as bad as it was 20+ years ago, maybe it is though.

    More in universities, more minorities and women in higher positions including government.

    A good part of me is still living in the 90's where all these inequality issues were much more relevant.

    So is it a big deal to get rid of these schools. Personally I can't ever see it happening.
     
  2. cheesyboy

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 7, 2012

    Posts: 12,328

    Location: Gloucestershire

    When the people with real clout are sending their kids to state schools, is when state schools will get the attention and resources they need.
     
  3. Roar87

    Soldato

    Joined: May 10, 2012

    Posts: 6,100

    Location: Leeds

    I don't think Jeremy Corbyn has the right to tell people they cannot send their children to a fee paying school. What a dangerous man.
     
  4. Thecaferacer

    Hitman

    Joined: Feb 3, 2019

    Posts: 747

    Suppose it's a good time to implement this policy since Diane Abbots and Shami Chakrabartis kids have finished their respective private school educations. Any earlier would have been hypocritical.

    In all seriousness, after the Labour years, and their policies of demonising any discipline, that turned many comprehensives into centres of crime and low expectation, how they have the brass neck to criticise schools that actually seek to install excellence is gauling.

    I went to a conservative era comprehensive and know several people who went to independent schools. The stereotypes of toffs etc just isn't true.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2019
  5. PlacidCasual

    Soldato

    Joined: May 13, 2003

    Posts: 6,283

    I’m sure the grant maintained system can accommodate an instantaneous increase of 7%. House prices should rise near good schools, nice windfall if you live in the right catchment and want to move.

    Barristers should be quids in arguing this one through the courts for years. Buy Sunseeker shares.
     
  6. cheesyboy

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 7, 2012

    Posts: 12,328

    Location: Gloucestershire

    That's as stupid as saying they shouldn't promote policies to improve public transport if they currently use cars to avoid using a terribly underresourced and insufficient public transport network.

    Basically, using an existing system to make the best of it, doesn't mean you agree with how the system works.

    Mr Gotcha has you covered:
     
  7. Thecaferacer

    Hitman

    Joined: Feb 3, 2019

    Posts: 747

    Utter rubbish, they used independent schools when it suited them to improve their offsprings chances. Abbott sent hers there in 2003 when she was in a government that could have easily taken action then.

    If they want to abolish private schools then heavily invest in public schools so that they are the preferred option. It's playing class politics because that's how the PLP sees everything.
     
  8. NickK

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 13, 2003

    Posts: 18,518

    indeed, if I had the money I would.
     
  9. SPG

    Soldato

    Joined: Jul 28, 2010

    Posts: 6,107

    Funny and here is me thinking it another cause of the massive gulf between the have's and have not's thats existed for centuries and its all happy families.......

    Damm right it needs to be stopped.
     
  10. Thecaferacer

    Hitman

    Joined: Feb 3, 2019

    Posts: 747

    We are a country where every single child is entitled to free education up to the age of 18 that must conform to basic standards. How much of the world do you think has that? There isn't some have not class here, only those being given better.

    Where I live it you attend one of the town centre comprehensives you are likely to attain lower grades than one of the comps located in the village barely 10 miles away. That's directly down to the community that it serves and no amount of financial investment, save employing ex royal marine drill Sgts to teach is liable to change that.

    Our kids are being failed at an educational level, but the blame doesn't fall with the schools or with the minority who attend private schools.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2019
  11. Nitefly

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Sep 24, 2005

    Posts: 32,151

    You can't blame people wanting the best for their children.

    Beyond that, I'm sort of neutral on the idea in principle, but dubious on its execution. You can't just tear down a system that exists willy nilly. The assimilation of private schools is going to be extraordinarily clumsy and expensive and, even then, who gets to go to these schools with better facilities that can only accommodate a limited number of pupils? Very curious.
     
  12. SPG

    Soldato

    Joined: Jul 28, 2010

    Posts: 6,107

    Yes it does, that 100k to send little lord jones could employ another teacher possibly two at said crap school to lower class size. Time and time again its been proven class sizes.

    It starts with the kids at infant school, its already too late for those in the system.
     
  13. Thecaferacer

    Hitman

    Joined: Feb 3, 2019

    Posts: 747

    Parents who send their children to private schools are already paying twice, basic tax which funds comps and then again on a private institution. They are infact already aiding with reducing demand as their child isn't being funded by the local authority. Most fee paying schools are also relatively modest as in fees are less than 40k over the entire school years.

    Nearly every private school runs bursaries, including Eton (I know for a fact as a friend from Clacton had his son win one) to subsidise children from disadvantaged backgrounds to attend if they are showing academic excellence (reflects well on their overall grade scores after all)

    If we want to discuss getting rid of private schools charitable status then that's something we can discuss, but to want to remove the entire system won't change a single thing and will just create an even greater postcode school lottery and greater segregation in the geographical community.
     
  14. RDM

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 1, 2007

    Posts: 20,348

    Class size is indeed one of the most important things. However closing down public and independent schools isn’t going to change that.
     
  15. Gray2233

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 25, 2010

    Posts: 2,086

    What on earth makes people think abolishing private schools will fix this perceived problem?

    If someone can afford to spend tens of thousands, or even hundreds of thousands on their child's education, they can quite easily afford to move/send them to private schools abroad should the option not be available here. Meaning the extortionate amount of money being spent on said education would then be spent outside of the country.
     
  16. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 67,830

    But you aren't going to get that 100K whichever way you throw it - meanwhile as pointed out above there are at least some benefits such as bursaries.
     
  17. SPG

    Soldato

    Joined: Jul 28, 2010

    Posts: 6,107

    Yes it will for a start we have a truckload more schools to use with some fantastic facilities that have somehow been gifted under a gilted carpet radar.
     
  18. cheesyboy

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 7, 2012

    Posts: 12,328

    Location: Gloucestershire

    Yes, exactly. She'd have been an idiot to have the means to send them, but choose not to, regardless of ideology. That was my point.

    My kids will be taking the 11+ and I'll be paying private tutors for them (already am with the eldest) to give them the best chance. I'd vote to abolish grammar schools too, given the chance, but whilst they're here, in this area, that's the reality of the world and it'd be stupid to not do the best for them.
     
  19. RDM

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 1, 2007

    Posts: 20,348

    Facilities that they won’t be able to afford as they won’t be getting the huge fees anymore. A few local schools will get some expensive facilities, not much else will change. But at least those posh kids you hate so much won’t benefit.
     
  20. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 67,830

    Facilities maybe but you won't have the income with it and the facilities will be little more than a drop in the ocean without the funds.

    You think rich people will continue to pay that kind of money after these changes? they won't - probably either get their kids educated abroad or setup prestigious companies with private home tutoring, etc.