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Landscaping - Swimming pool removal?

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by PermaChanged, 10 Jun 2021.

  1. 413x

    Capodecina

    Joined: 13 Jan 2010

    Posts: 23,500

    Location: Llaneirwg

    Just seen you are keeping it. What a fab thing to have.

    I remember tipping barrels of hypochlorite into that pool. It was 8ft deep too so a lot of water.

    I actually annoyingly do not know the cost to keep it heated, my grandparents pool.

    In UK I'm not sure if I'd want a pool. (for myself)
    Personally it would have to be big enough to swim. 10m is very annoying to swim in. You are always turning!
    I'd have to earn enough to keep it heated/pumped etc.
    Use it enough to warrant it.


    Hope you do keep it cause it will look fab. But I know for myself as I'm a swimmer. I just wouldn't get use out of it.
    (nor could I afford it! )

    If you have kids however. It's amazing. It's absolutely worth it for kids. As said. It basically gave me my love of watersports. And now, at 35 I am so thankful I was fortunate enough to grow up with that!
    Without that I wouldn't have got into swimming, kayaking, scuba etc.
     
  2. gailjon

    Hitman

    Joined: 10 Nov 2015

    Posts: 924

    We had a cover fitted over our 12m x 6m pool and never had to use the gas pool boiler again except at the start and end of the season.

    This is the one we fitted: https://www.abrisud.co.uk/removable-enclosure/removable-pool-enclosure
     
  3. dale1uk

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 15 Nov 2005

    Posts: 2,216

    Location: Newcastle

    ASHPs definitely work and can heat pools to 35°c +, providing they are spec'd correctly. I've fitted a good number to domestic pools over the last few years as they become a lot more efficient and compact.
     
  4. PermaChanged

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2006

    Posts: 4,124

    Cheers all, going to be a fun project to be involved with for sure! We've stripped off the tile band ready for a new one, have lifted copings and will have a weekend of lifting slabs out.

    Thanks for that, will look in to their offerings :)
     
  5. PermaChanged

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2006

    Posts: 4,124

    Just a small update - but we have a loose date in the diary of late October for the following;

    Air source heat pump install
    New coping stones fitted
    New tile band
    Steps re-profiled - rounded edge with the same tile as used on the band covering the round

    The stone for the coping is yet to be chosen, but the options are pretty endless. We may go natural stone rather than porcelain for their through colouring and being easier to shape, however I do like the idea of porcelain for ease of maintenance and more uniform finish.

    Current pool state, and the mosaics for the band which we've chosen - the top middle one.

    [​IMG]

    https://imgur.com/a/BNfZVk5
     
  6. b0rn2sk8

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Mar 2003

    Posts: 9,262

    I can see you’ve started cleaning the slabs in the top right, they must have at least decade of grime on them.
     
  7. PermaChanged

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2006

    Posts: 4,124

    After the eye watering quote to have the whole patio re-done, yes we've started to clean up the existing as a temporary "fix" to get the pool up area up and running :p

    We've been told that the reason they're in such poor shape is that they've been dot and dabbed in place, with inadequate drainage in place too - allowing pooling, freezing and then subsiding. Eventually we'll ditch the existing slabs, take out a few inches of what's under them and re concrete the whole pad - all in we're looking at £25k+ due to the 200sq/m of concrete and new slabs required.
     
  8. Firestar_3x

    Caporegime

    Joined: 11 Mar 2005

    Posts: 30,660

    Location: Leafy Cheshire

    Looks good, thought about painting the pool render?
     
  9. mikehhhhhhh

    Hitman

    Joined: 19 Dec 2017

    Posts: 713

    I'm glad you've decided to reinstate the pool, it can't be any more expensive than removing it and who doesn't want a pool in their garden? :D

    On a smaller scale, I was in a similar position with an abandoned pond in our garden that would have cost more to remove than fix. I love it now, it's become a proper little fun project :)
     
  10. PermaChanged

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2006

    Posts: 4,124

    Yes, we've had discussions with our pool guy - basically painting the render is great as a short term fix only. The correct way to paint the pool is very labour intensive, and takes weeks in curing time before you're allowed to fill the pool with water and use it, he said to go that route it if we were selling the property within the next year as it'll look great. But because it's not a long term fix, and needs to be repainted regularly it's not an economical option for us as long term owners. We'll be looking at tiling the whole pool, when funds permit.

    He's confident that with an acid wash, and the standard chlorine and other water chemicals, the marbelite pool render should come up nice and white again.
     
  11. theone8181

    Soldato

    Joined: 27 Mar 2013

    Posts: 6,342

    Looks good, bet it'll take a while to fill with a hosepipe though:D.
     
  12. Bobmunkhouse

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2005

    Posts: 2,005

    Live stream that and you have a YouTube channel...
     
  13. Delvis

    Caporegime

    Joined: 7 Nov 2004

    Posts: 29,640

    Location: Buckinghamshire

    It doesn't actually cost that much to heat a hot tub. Particularly if you keep it at temperature.
     
  14. Firestar_3x

    Caporegime

    Joined: 11 Mar 2005

    Posts: 30,660

    Location: Leafy Cheshire

    Or if the ambient temperature is extreme, no intention of heating my Pool when I finally move to Texas!
     
  15. PermaChanged

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2006

    Posts: 4,124

    We tore out that door last night, and took out the lintel too - ready to be blocked off soon! This thread is seemingly going to turn in to a complete house renovation log :p


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: 25 Oct 2021
  16. PermaChanged

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2006

    Posts: 4,124

    We've put many more hours in to the outside pool area, still waiting for final drawings from the architect so nothing can be done indoors which means this has still been our primary focus. A digger came in to take out the flowerbeds and any tree roots which were in and around the pool area, and then we moved on to removing all the patio slabs ourselves by hand. We've binned 2 skip loads of wastage slabs, the rest have been taken off our hands via Facebook market place which made our lives easier.

    We've now ordered 260sq/m :)eek:) of 20mm porcelain tiles to be laid out here, but still have an awful lot of prep work left!

    [​IMG]

    Underneath the slabs the concrete base appears to only to be roughly an inch thick on top of soil which seems surprisingly soft! This weekend we'll get in a digger to smash this concrete, and dig out a fair few inches of soil, allowing us a decent base to lay our new porcelains on. When lifting the existing slabs the whole floor which they were laid on was shifting underneath us.

    [​IMG]

    Serious amounts of dot and dab going on!

    [​IMG]

    Lighting cables directly under the patio stuck down with the dot and dab too.

    [​IMG]

    The thin concrete over the soil is cracked all over the place!

    [​IMG]
     
  17. dLockers

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 21 Jan 2010

    Posts: 8,325

    Do we think the dot and dab was a poor decision or the right decision at the time?
     
  18. PermaChanged

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Jan 2006

    Posts: 4,124

    As far as we know the patio was installed a good 30 years ago, and it was an extremely common method back then to just dot a dab like crazy!

    We need to dig out 8 inch of depth of the surrounding earth, lay 4 inches of 40mm down hardcore and then a 4 inch reinforced concrete bed on top of all that - like I say, we've got plenty more prep work to be doing :p
     
  19. Delvis

    Caporegime

    Joined: 7 Nov 2004

    Posts: 29,640

    Location: Buckinghamshire

    Dot and dab works just it will allow crackage to occur to slabs if too much pressure is applied, it can also allow seepage to come through and leave blots on top of the slabs.

    Just take the extra time and lay a proper mix down and be done with it tbh :D
     
  20. Delvis

    Caporegime

    Joined: 7 Nov 2004

    Posts: 29,640

    Location: Buckinghamshire

    Ouch.

    I'm hoping you're getting a lorry mixer in