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LGA out after Intel Broadwell??

Soldato
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Excellent english translation :p

I guess all of these changes from intel is due to changes in computing market plus lack of competition from Amd.

What will become of skymont then? Will intel introduce a newer architecture after skylake?

Interesting times ahead if all this is true.
 
Associate
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After reading that IB-E will be six core + 15mb cache just like SB-E I think its safe to say Intel have no interest in desktop CPU's these days....

Also Haswell just being a power saving / little-to-no power gain exercise.
 
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After reading that IB-E will be six core + 15mb cache just like SB-E

Is this in any way confirmed ? I was kind of hoping we would see an 8-core k-series from SB-E.
I mean, I'm sure Intel would rather CPU power junkies bought Xeons but with the +50% Overclock of the I7s, a £1500 Xeon performs about the same as my CPU in multi-threaded & 50% slower in single threaded.
I don't mind because I only just got mine & don't have the budget for an upgrade soon but I had hoped we would see a 'mainstream' (relatively speaking) 8 core, maybe even a 3930k equivalent around the £500- 600 mark.
 
Soldato
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Actually,this could all be down to what Anandtech reported earlier. Intel have over half their 22NM fabs going idle now,and if anything that means the expensive investment in 22NM is probably taking longer to pay off. The TDP reduction is going to be less important for desktops anyway,so by keeping the desktop CPUs on 22NM,that means they can use the 22NM fabs longer. On top of this this means,they will probably transition slower to 14NM and use this mostly for mobile devices,and this might end up more cost effective for them.

It seems a lot of the tech media missed this:

http://www.electronicsweekly.com/Ar...ning-delays-14nm-raises-fears-for-ireland.htm

14NM is being delayed by six months at the Ireland fab.
 
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Saw about this on Gigabytes Facebook page, apparently Haswell will be the last to use a normal socket and the next gen will be soldered onto the MB
 
Soldato
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bru

bru

Soldato
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Many apologies, i saw that one thread was a few days newer than the other,and then promptly posted about it being a repost, in the wrong thread.:eek:
Again many apologies.
 
Soldato
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Whatever happens there will still be an interchangeable high end socket for the next few years, It's only the cheap midrange stuff that will end up being soldered.

Eventually the traitional desktop PC's will fade away, but the PC will live on in one form or another, low power / small form factor and Gaming / web browsing software will still all be possible just in a new format. I like how quick it's progressing tbh.

Like how the Calculator replaced the Abacus, change is good.
 
Soldato
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According to TR,there might be a good chance that lower end Broadwell CPUs are soldered on:

http://techreport.com/news/24191/trusted-source-confirms-soldered-on-broadwell-cpus

So,it looks like budget PC builders who start with a cheaper CPU for the first year or two and then upgrade,are probably a bit screwed,if the news is true. OTH,it could be more for pre-builds,so hopefully a few lower end CPUs and motherboards will still have sockets.
 
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Soldato
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Seems like the first (albeit small) signs of traditional CPUs fading away. We're starting to reach physical limits with current production methods. Still for the short term enthusiast end I wouldnt be too worried. a good few years for us yet :)
 
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Moving more in the direction of SOC's makes sense for the corporate market, SFF PC's that just sit on someones desk for a few years before being replaced. But it may make the enthusiast market a bit dull. But I suppose its ok as long as they continue to provide high performance models. Or perhaps this is just the beginning of the end for the PC as a games machine altogether? Consoles or cloud gaming only in the future...
 
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enthusiasts have always been a minority, so i don't see why they would stop manufacturing things like high end graphics cards and high end discrete cpus. people will keep buying silly hardware. but desktops are becoming legacy/enthusiast platforms anyway. definitely in the mid-range and below i wouldn't be surprised if gpus and cpus start being embedded into SOCs. if intel start soldering cpus on mobos it wouldn't be such a big deal anyway. most people upgrade mobo and cpu at the same time. how many people go from 3570k to 3770k...
 
Soldato
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enthusiasts have always been a minority, so i don't see why they would stop manufacturing things like high end graphics cards and high end discrete cpus. people will keep buying silly hardware. but desktops are becoming legacy/enthusiast platforms anyway. definitely in the mid-range and below i wouldn't be surprised if gpus and cpus start being embedded into SOCs. if intel start soldering cpus on mobos it wouldn't be such a big deal anyway. most people upgrade mobo and cpu at the same time. how many people go from 3570k to 3770k...

Im certainly one of those who upgrades them together, however you will only get low end boards with lower end chips, and high end boards with high end chips.


You wouldn't get the lower end CPU in a high end board allowing you to overclock the nads off it.

Still, we have time for now. The market is getting dull already with a lack of viable alternatives (in the enthusiast level)
 
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i hadn't thought of that. but my idea is that lower end pcs will eventually be phased out anyway. i think that's the trend. amd is being rubbish with cpus, gpus are being integrated into cpus, intel is rumoured to want to start producing cpus soldered onto mobos, and pc sales are declining, with microsoft claiming and acting like desktops are a legacy platform. it actually makes sense. the desktop is almost an enthusiast only platform now. at some point i kind of do think desktops will be high end parts only (with high end premium prices), with everyone else using tablets or laptops
 
Soldato
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You wouldn't get the lower end CPU in a high end board allowing you to overclock the nads off it.

This hasn't been the case for quite a while now anyway since the introduction of K series chip, so enthusiasts are already paying for top end parts for overclock.
 
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