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Major Websites down due to cloud issue

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by snips86x, 8 Jun 2021.

  1. dLockers

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 21 Jan 2010

    Posts: 8,334

    Yes at 10x the cost
     
  2. malachi

    Capodecina

    Joined: 27 Jun 2006

    Posts: 10,918

    Location: Not here

    And you need to be in the right location too.

    Azure service are not in the available in every country. So you have better redundancy in North America compared to South America.
     
  3. Danthus

    Capodecina

    Joined: 5 Jun 2010

    Posts: 15,375

    Why were Amazon using a third party for a CDN?
     
  4. Worthy

    Don

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 6,982

    Location: Manchester

    This is the bit that surprised me the most. AWS has its own CDN doesn't it?
     
  5. Screeeech

    Mobster

    Joined: 29 Dec 2014

    Posts: 4,218

    Location: 16509

    Cloud companies like AWS/Azure/Google whatever, are so utterly enormous, that parts of them are always "on fire" in the sense that on any given day, all of those providers will be having some sort of large scale outage. The reality is, these companies are so large, that they're often able to shift things around, and are so resiliant - nobody ever knows. Automation is at such a level, that most faults get fixed entirely by automation and don't require human intervention at all. Obviously occasionally, something really bad happens and we see these global outages - but on the whole, this isn't actually anything new, we do get large scale outages from time to time, due to one reason or another.

    In terms of the benefits of the cloud, I'll give you an example;

    Back in 2015 I helped design and build the worlds largest low-latency gaming network, designed purely to give players the lowest possible ping. We had hundreds of locations all over the world, in the end we probably spent in the region of $500m and it worked very well. At the same time - we ran most of our servers on "bare metal" in our own DCs. (all of this costs a fortune, required around 150 people to run it all)

    Eventually, we started playing with AWS - the benefit, is that it's just so easy to turn stuff on, because it just is... Time goes on - devs just start doing stuff inside AWS because it's easy and fast and it works well. To the point that, it's actually easier to login to the AWS portal, spin up your stuff and get it going - than it is to walk 10ft across the office and ask someone to build it on your own infrastructure (which already exists). Coupled with the fact that "because it's Amazon" people just sign it off.

    It got to the point, where if I wanted say, $5m in network hardware and costs, combined with 6x months of resource to build 2x new POPs (points of presence) and everything that goes with it. I'd have to go through the eye of a needle - but if somebody wanted to spend $50m on Amazon - don't even ask, it's approved - the costs just got absorbed as part of "the bill" and I believe we were in the top 10 largest AWS customers at the time.

    Then you have performance. At the start AWS was pretty crap for latency because of the locations, so our own global network was way better - but eventually they brought out "global accelerator" which allowed us to connect players into the closest AWS edge nodes and run them on servers as close as possible to them, whilst using the collosal AWS backbone. It got to the point where - combined with the servers inside AWS and global accelerator - we simply couldn't compete with it. If I'd have spent $1Bn on our network it would still have fallen way short, it wouldn't have made sense.

    Cut to the chase - most of the stuff started moving away from our infrastructure to AWS - I quit the company, and am now a senior design engineer at AWS...
     
  6. dLockers

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 21 Jan 2010

    Posts: 8,334

    We are also noting that firms are avoiding investment in bare metal due to talent strategy. You buy AWS, you get the best talent in the world without having to find and nurture it yourself.
     
  7. Screeeech

    Mobster

    Joined: 29 Dec 2014

    Posts: 4,218

    Location: 16509

    Yeah if I was hiring decent engineers to work for a hypothetical company, I know that the good ones are eventually going to talk to people, word will get around - then one day, they're going to get canvassed on Linkedin, and get offered $$$ to do cutting edge tech + Visa to the US (or wherever) which I would never be able to compete with..
     
  8. Danthus

    Capodecina

    Joined: 5 Jun 2010

    Posts: 15,375

    That was what I thought. :)
     
  9. Lmg80

    Hitman

    Joined: 20 Nov 2016

    Posts: 623

    Thank you :)
     
  10. Beansprout

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 31 Jan 2004

    Posts: 16,326

    Location: Plymouth

    Was surprised to see this the other day. But as a Fastly shareholder I'm pretty happy for the publicity, it's a great little company!

    And not so little it seems...gov.uk is pointed directly to them!

    Would be nice if the share price recovered after the drop due to Tiktok drama.... :)


    AWS and its myriad of services is great (I use Global Accelerator and other fun things), but sometimes there is a company out there which does what you need slightly better.