my daily is sick (mondeo tdci)

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Anyone much experience, ? my 2003 tdci is ill. Happened the other night, went to over take a lorry in 4th and it cut out dead on me. I can re produce the fault, any high revs in 4th or 5th gear it drops into safe mode and glow plug light flashes up. Its only in the higher gears. Once i turn ignition on and off, it clears and i have turbo again until the above.
Have changed fuel filter this morning (all be it not branded), removed and cleaned EGR valve. reset ecu. Ran fuel cleaner through system too in fresh fuel. Still the same

I have not managed to plug it in or fault scan it yet, but so far it seems with googling, it can range from injectors, sensors, fuel pump, turbo, actuator, lol

Any experienced ? 145k on car
 
Soldato
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Not personally, but this sounds really similar to a problem a guy had on here a while ago - might be worth searching, can't remember the thread I'm afraid.
 
Soldato
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TDCi is prone to injectors. However Mondeo's of that range seem to be prone to a few niggles. These are from Honest Johns site.

What's Bad
Criticised for "unstable body structure" in 2001 NCAP test, despite four star score. Still seems to lack space for oddments inside cockpit.

Reports of poor 35mpg economy from stop-gap 2.0 litre 115bhp TDDI engine. 2.0 TDDI diesel engine also prone to flat spots and surging.

All Mondeo IIIs, petrol and diesel manuals have dual mass flywheels that can fail.

On early LX and Zetecs the bottom of the seat is not very friendly to the coccyx. Also uncomfortable for heavier drivers because the plastic pins holding the molded padding in place can actually protrude through to the seat face. Later models much improved.

Possible security issue in that access can be gained via passenger door when car is locked and immobilised.

Petrol models rated fewest breakdowns but poor for problems and faults in 2003 Which survey.

What to Watch Out For
WARNING An engine rattle from 2000-2003 1.8i and 2.0i petrol engines might indicate wearing of the shaft of the injection air inlet manifold flaps. If the shaft breaks and the flaps come off they are then ingested by the engine, wrecking it. This is becoming increasingly common. Also affects 1.8i engines. See www.talkford.com/topic/97564-important-inlet-manifold-failure-in-graphic-detail/ This was rectified from 2003 by an improved inlet manifold design.

Two reports of timing chain tensioner rattles on 2001MY 2.0 litre petrol engines, fixed under warranty.

Several complaints of wind noise from front and rear door seals. Reports in 2008 of water leaks through lower front door seals.

TDCI 130bhp engine may suffer from starting problems and uneven idling, may misfire between 1,800 and 2,000rpm, may sometimes cut out and may not be particularly economical with 42.5 mpg fairly typical. Partially cured by a an ECU software download, but head and injectors have also been modified on later cars.
Also reports of the TDCI smoking and of high oil consumption, which may be turbo oil seals.

Reports of problems with camshaft position sensors of TDCI 130s. Spate of clutch and dual-mass flywheel failures on 2003 built 2004 model year TDCIs. Starting problems with diesel may be due to impending clutch failure. Iron filings from failing dual mass flywheels can get into the starter motor and cause starting problems. 13/10/07 Voluntary Recall letter to some owners of TDDIs and TDCIs to replace faulty dual mass flywheels. Ford will sometimes contribute to the very high replacement costs of dual mass flywheels and clutches if the car has done less than 45,000 miles. On diesels used as taxis, DMFs and clutches typically last 30,000 - 40,000 miles.

TDCI injectors seem to be very fuel sensitive. Many have needed to be replaced after 3-4 years and circa 60,000 miles.

Report of turbo oil-seal failure in 2.2 TDCi turbo caused engine to run on its sump oil and self-destruct. Bill for replacement engine, turbo, catalytic converter, exceeded £7,000. By early 2010, diesel pump failures also damaging the injectors were on the increase for both the 2.0 and 2.2 litre diesels.

When replacing injectors, the new improved Delphi injectors are smaller than the originals and require a different seal. Use of original type of seal will result in fuel leaks.

Diff problem starting to crop up on TDCI 130 6-speeds from around 3 years old.

Reports of failures of fuel tank lifter pumps leading to fuel delivery problems in 2.0 petrol models.

Reports of out of true alloy wheels.

Check inside edges of the bottoms of all doors of 2000 - 2003 cars for paint lifting and corrosion because the wax sealing between the door frame and skin can fail.

Check for corroded rear brake pipes where they pass over the fuel tank (an MOT failure point).

Check rear suspension bushes which can become loose in the attachment points (an MOT failure point) and used to require a new subframe costing £300 - £500 to replace. Ford now has a procedure that removes the need for a new subframe involving a new type of bush, a special tool (part number is 205-047-07) and Loctite 270 superglue (part number 1128-392). Unfortunately the tool and glue have been in short supply. The solution will not work if the subframe has corroded around the attachment points.

Look for rust around chrome number plate light cover on Ghia estates.

Undertray of ST very difficult to remove to get to engine supm plug, then very difficult to put back. 16 fasteners and a two man job.

Reports of 2nd gear band breaking up in 4-speed autobox, contaminating the ATF and requiring the box to be rebuilt. These boxes tend to have a life of 60k - 90k.

JATCO advises owners of later 5-speed autoboxes not to carry out AUTOMATIC transmission fluid changes hemselves because it's difficult to ensure the correct amount is added (the gearbox needs to be run to a specific temperature - This requires diagnostic equipment) and probably they will use the wrong oil, e.g. Land Rover Discovery ATF is different from a Land Rover Freelander, and Jaguar X-Type (Jatco) uses different ATF to a Land Rover Freelander (Jatco).

ST models can suffer from drooping rear bumper/valence mouldings (www.stdrivers.co.uk

Rear tracking is adjustable for toe in / toe out, but cannot be set with some types of alloy wheel because they do not have continuous rims and confuse the laser. Too much toe in will make the steering very light. Too much toe out will lead to severe tyre inner shoulder wear.

Flexible front brake hoses vulnerable to chafing when not secured properly, and this can cause total brake failure if ruptured.

One reader's catalogue of failures from his 1.8SCi: "Coolant leaks, water leaks, alloy wheel paint flaking around the valves, the Sat-Nav/Air/CD control has a tendency to freeze but worst of all the fuel consumption is very bad. Less than 30 mpg, where my previous 2001 1.8 Zetec gave me 35mpg." Seems to have a problem with the air con pipe at the front of the engine. Fix is new type of pipe £227 all in.

One case of rust-through of water jacket of 2.0i petrol engine.

On pre-2003 cars an a/c hose can chafeon the vertical joint of two flanges behind the front bumper and eventually sever, losing the refrigerant. Replacements are £80 but are modified so they do not chafe on the flange.

Engine surging of 2.0 litre petrol can be cured by a new idle control valve.

Wired in Quickclear screen tend to fail after 9 years or so.

Problem with rear hatchback lock causes by cold d and bad weather in the switch itself cured by a new switch at £25 from Ford.

If I had to put my money on it, it is the start of injector failure.
 
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Soldato
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Get a code scanner on it when the condition appears, will give you an indication of the problem. Can be so many different things.
 
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Man of Honour
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Probably injectors. Get the codes read first before anything.

Then get an injector leak off test done to see if one or more are dodgy. It might be warmth taking them to get refurbished by a specialist (Delphi I think).
 
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Soldato
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I had similar issues and it turned out to be water in the fuel filter but you've changed that already it seems :(

So many things it could be :(
 
Soldato
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Does seem to be the TDCi's Achilles heal. Unfortunately frighteningly expensive as well.

Depends where you go and how you deal with it. A lot of garages will just replace all 4, but find a decent specialist who can test them and you'll probably find only one is on its way. It's been some years since I looked at costs, but it shouldn't be too frightening. There is a school of thought that says when one goes, the others won't be far behind - but replacing them all for the sake of it seems unecessary
 

Jay

Jay

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Best to get a code reader (F-Super - You can reprogram the injectors with this which can solve issues)

I had a similar issue and it was the Actuator controll arm sticking. The vents/splines in the turbo get clogged with soot.

Best way to check is to remove the turbo heat sheild, remove the actuator arm pin, then gently rock the actuator arm back and forth to ensure it moves freely. If its stiff just keep rocking it back and forth until it free's up.

Other things it could be:

Injectors
Turbo
boost pipe leak.
 
Soldato
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I had a similar issue and it was the Actuator control arm sticking. The vents/splines in the turbo get clogged with soot.

This is probably more likely than the injector problem.

With the injectors the problem doesn't normally go away when you switch off and re start.

With a sticky VV turbo the engine will cut out when it over-boosts but cycling the ignition switch will clear the problem until next time it occurs.

See http://www.innotecworld.com/products/sets-systems.php?productid=6 for a reasonably effective cleaning kit for VV turbos that can be used in situ.

As a general rule I would advise people with modern diesels to use a premium fuel (I find BP Supreme effective) on the grounds that cleaner burning fuels lead to fewer injector/turbo problems and that paying a few extra p/L can reduce the likelihood of very expensive repairs down the line!
 
Soldato
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A traditional turbo regulated boost by having a simple pressure operated valve that allowed the exhaust to bypass the turbo once the max boost was reached. It was a crude system but works just fine.

However, In keeping with all things modern, the manufacturers felt that turbos could be made better by making them far more complicated so on the more modern ones the boost regulation is controlled by having variable fins (for want of a better description) inside the exhaust turbine housing that can vary the amount of "power" that can be extracted from the exhaust stream and so vary the amount of "Power" that can be fed (and therefore the amount of boost) to the compressor turbine.

This works well when it works. But, the combination of complex assemblies incorporating precision moving parts and a hot crap filled diesel exhaust is not a good one and eventually the whole lot will get clagged up like EGR valves do and stop working. The first (And frequently intermittent) symptoms are typically when the vanes stick during hard acceleration and fail to ease off the boost as max revs/power are approached.

The ECU will register this "Overboost" condition and shut the engine down to stop it from exploding.

Typically when this happens, "Cycling" the ignition switch will clear the safe mode until the fault recurs.
 
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