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My Photos.. critique and feedback very welcome!

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by keenan, Mar 18, 2014.

  1. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Hi guys, I'm very new to photography and would like to learn as much as possible. I will post my photos here and I would appreciate if you guys could give some feedback, tips or critique.. I have a Canon EOS 500D with a 50mm F/1.8 and a Tamron 90mm F/2.8

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    wellesley road by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr

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    rusty by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr

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    the wall by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr

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    taking the bus by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr

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    yolk by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr

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    pencil by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr

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    power web by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr

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    walko mono by jacquesdewinnaar, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2014
  2. alexthecheese

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 10, 2006

    Posts: 3,977

    I like the spoon dude, but the aperture is too wide on the first two. It'd be nice to have enough DOF to be able to read the sign, and there's nothing really for your eyes to focus on in the second.

    I like the processing, mind. And el dudo is a cool one. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2014
  3. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Thanks Alex, I'm still learning about which aperture to use.. Dont know if it's just with the older body's, but the viewfinder doesn't give the best reaction to aperture adjustments. I suppose it will get easier once I learn the lens and know the focus distance each aperture value provides.
     
  4. Razor-BladE

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 15, 2009

    Posts: 3,889

    Location: Bristol

    The viewfinder doesn't give any indication of dof because the aperture blades don't 'activate' until a photo is actually taken. However, there is a dof preview button on the camera body near the underside of the lens which when held down, activates the blades allowing you to preview the dof.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2014
  5. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Haha, I never even knew that.. thanks for the info!
     
  6. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 28,532

    I don't really get the subject in the first 4 and the composition is weak to me.

    The telegraph pole has the most potential but the over-top HDR has ruined the photo and the artifacts and halos are ghastly IMO. In general the processing hasn't helped any of these photos, all are over sharpened really.

    My advice would be to take a step back and forget the processing for the time being and concentrate on the basic of composition, framing, selecting interesting subject matter at times with good lighting. When the out of camera jpegs are brilliant then you have a stronger canvas to work on during PP and the time sat in front of a monitor can be reduced.


    But that is just my opinion, take or leave it for what it is. I realize it is harsh, i haven't softened my response and wrapped it in cotton wool for you, just spouted out my dislike. But I do believe it is a constructive critique.
     
  7. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Thanks for the feedback, I dont mind the harsh tone, it's still constructive ;)

    I do realize I need a lot more practice with composition and framing and taking 1000's photographs is likely the best way of getting better at it. I do welcome any tips that will help in my path to learning ;)
     
  8. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 28,532

    I would get the book "The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photo" by Michael Freeman as an excellent resource.

    Instead of taking 1000s of photos think about each and every photo you take before you even press the shutter. Think what elements in the scene would add balance, what the subject is, will the subject be interesting, how will the viewer be guided to the scene elements, what are the leading lines, colors, shapes, contrasts. Don't take 1000s of photos and pray for a a good one or expect to magically get better, repetition without understanding and analysis wont be progressive. Try to take fewer photos that are better thought out, take your time, think, try the same scene with a few different compositions to compare and contrast. Don't go out with the intention of coming home with card filled with hundreds of photos to go through, go out with the hope of getting 1 or 2 great photos you would love to show off to people and don't be upset if you come home with nothing if the mood, lighting, conditions, subject did not become conductive.
     
  9. a1ex2001

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 14, 2005

    Posts: 10,654

    Location: Here and There...

    I really like the egg shot for some reason something about it really appeals but the others I'm not so keen on. Other than the shot of the kid theay all lack one key ingredient for me and that is a subject, when I look at them i'm not sure what they are of or what the photo is trying to say to me if that makes sense.

    I'm inclined to agree about the processing it is a bit over the top but thats all part and parcel of finding your own style everyone has experimented and tried different things before finding something they are happy with.

    Quoted this because I think it's great advice, I often go out and never lift the camera to my eye friends and family will ask why I've carried it round all day and taken nothing and I always say because I didn't see anything that I had to shoot. The other funny one I find if I shoot a similar shot a dozen different ways it is usually the first one that I like most when I get home! Instinct is a powerful tool.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2014
  10. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Thanks for the advise guys, definitely taken to heart!
     
  11. Baron C

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 10, 2012

    Posts: 1,405

    Location: So where?

    As a fellow learner , I'll add that less is more. I went out Friday and whilst out for a good 9hours in London, I came back with approx 40 shots of which 3 are remotely worth taking further. Like D.P. advises if the basics are not there you won't progress.

    I recommend the freeman books, I have both the photographers mind and photographers eye editions. ( get the books as the kindle versions are horrible with low resolution images which kind of defeats the purpose of a photography book )

    I'm terrified of pp, as it gives me too much time to mull over and frankly ruin an impression. ;)
     
  12. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Thank you Baron C, I will definitely look into getting both of them..

    Here's another one, done some pp, but nothing major..

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    miemie by jdewinnaar, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2014
  13. alexthecheese

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 10, 2006

    Posts: 3,977

    I really like that. If you cleaned the windows it'd be even better. :p Definitely an emotion to the shot. Particularly as he has no eyes. :eek:
     
  14. Baron C

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 10, 2012

    Posts: 1,405

    Location: So where?

    I like that image, as Alex says, it's emotive for sure.
     
  15. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Thanks guys, I got "The Photographer's Eye" and will be spending some time taking it all in..

    My friend allowed me to take a portrait of him and this is what I came up with..

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    Here's one with my son attempting to be creative..

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    As well as an attempt by me..

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    Last edited: Apr 6, 2014
  16. THC_SsSsSnake

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jan 7, 2003

    Posts: 1,469

    Location: Leicester

    sorry to butt in but does this apply if one is still learning how the 3 parts of the exposure triangle work,i take lots and lots of photos to see how each of the 3 main elements works with each other.is it after this one then follows what you advise.
    thanks very much,all advice welcome.
     
  17. oio

    Associate

    Joined: Feb 23, 2010

    Posts: 38

    For what it's worth, the photo that really catches my eye here is the bus stop sign. That harsh, desaturated, abstracted urban scene is an appealing background, and the semiotic breakdown of the sign caught between frames makes for a fun reaction to it.
     
  18. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

  19. Camalot

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 7, 2005

    Posts: 6,601

    Location: Wolverhampton

    What kind of PP have you added in the first few shots?
     
  20. keenan

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 22, 2009

    Posts: 341

    Hi, just desaturated, upped the clarity and contrast along with high pass and a light vignette..