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No Software Required: Raspberry Pi Uses Electromagnetic Waves to Detect Malware

Discussion in 'Small Form Factor and Single Board Computers' started by SourChipmunk, 14 Jan 2022.

  1. SourChipmunk

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Nov 2003

    Posts: 9,488

    Location: The Motor City

  2. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 13 Oct 2006

    Posts: 79,317

    I've only skimmed the details but looks like it only really works for embedded systems which have a very defined "clean" state in normal operation.

    Something like a PC with very varied operating states normally likely it wouldn't work with.
     
  3. Frozennova

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 13 Nov 2009

    Posts: 11,492

    Location: Northampton

    It's entirely feasible, and much more common than you would think. NewAE produce a set of tools for Side channel analysis.

    Much of the focus is around finding vulnerabilities as exploits rather than for malware detection. Certain operations produce very repeatable and consistent power draw traces from an embedded processor. AES is incredibly trivial to discover the keys for using differential power analysis
     
  4. SourChipmunk

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Nov 2003

    Posts: 9,488

    Location: The Motor City

    That certainly helps clear it up for me. In summary: they are scanning systems with a fairly static operation. In other words, any system will run within certain thresholds regarding heat, power consumption, things like that. So, if there is a [calculated] variation in monitored items, it will trigger an alert. Does that sound accurate?

    I don’t know why the articles specify “malware”… this type of scan would be useful for detecting potential hardware failures or other unexpected loads. Pretty cool if you ask me.

    Thanks for the feedback!