Non stick pans.. that last!

Soldato
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You can happily use a 260C non stick wok.
yes but that's not enough
- wok cooking at higher temps produces better results , as documented, -if- you have a gas burner to put the btu's into the pan, and sustain that high temp
- even for frying pans (pictured) we personally want crispy bits, so are exceeding that
typically using rapeseed or rapeseed&groundnut mix.



Product should never be overheated. Low or medium heat is recommended for product with nonstick coatings. The coatings are completely safe for normal kitchen use, including baking or frying, and can be used at temperature up to approximately 500° F (260° C). As is the case with most pots and pans, nonstick product should not be left unattended or allowed to reach extreme temperatures. Additionally, cooking should not be conducted in poorly ventilated areas. Read all manufacturer instructions for proper usage before using any product.
 
Caporegime
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yes but that's not enough
- wok cooking at higher temps produces better results , as documented, -if- you have a gas burner to put the btu's into the pan, and sustain that high temp
- even for frying pans (pictured) we personally want crispy bits, so are exceeding that
typically using rapeseed or rapeseed&groundnut mix.


Sure but why did you heat your frying pan till you blued the steel?

"The coatings are completely safe for normal kitchen use, including baking or frying, and can be used at temperature up to approximately 500° F (260° C)"

^ your link for your circulon pan, that you heated to 300+c

I've got carbon steel, stainless steel and non stick allly. Not got a blued bottom on any of them cause I'm not stupid. Is ya wok blue underneath?
Is your burner clogged given how localised it is?
 
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Soldato
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How do you find the non stick wok does it brown nicely?

I have a carbon steel one and unlike the carbon steel skillet I find it a nightmare just dirty and awkward to clean due to how things don't quite smoothly layer on it because a cooker gas hob is not a commercial wok burner theybseem made for

Doesn’t get as hot whatever the extra tough coating does, but only using it on an electric hob.

Gas would work much better I think.

I have enamel coated stuff that gets really hot but the non-stick fails fairly quick! Compromise really…
 
Soldato
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Iron lecreuset wok I use on gas never sticks (to clean - boiling water, and nylon pan scrubber to get any residue of - dry w/kitchen roll) you couldn't treat a non-stick to those temperatures though ...
would be interesting to have an infrared thermometer - if they can read accurately off of the patina surface, likewise to try this on the, now retired, non-stick circulon pan.

Sure but why did you heat your frying pan till you blued the steel?
bottom doesn't go blue it's got a stainless outer on the circulon - so can't observe that as an indication of over-heating.

going for broke - tried all-sorts to clean off the residue that gets stuck on the concentric ridges, oven cleaner etc. may try some of the 15% bleach recently got for the paving upkeep.
 
Associate
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I've always used non-stick and was looking at replacing it (again!) however reading this thread and doing some research I've just ordered a couple of carbon steels. I honestly don't understand why the non-stick is pushed so much in physical stores given how long they don't last in comparison!
Fingers crossed these pans last a lifetime!
 
Caporegime
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Wish i was in a Ramen Shop Counter
I've always used non-stick and was looking at replacing it (again!) however reading this thread and doing some research I've just ordered a couple of carbon steels. I honestly don't understand why the non-stick is pushed so much in physical stores given how long they don't last in comparison!
Fingers crossed these pans last a lifetime!

You would have to shoot it with an AR15 if you want to kill a carbon steel pan...
 
Soldato
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23,656
I just get Tefal. Never had the non-stick fail as long as I don't scratch it. I hand wash pans.
The problem I've had with cheaper pans is the handles coming loose, but you can spend more to get riveted handles, which is worth it imo.
e.g. https://www.tefal.co.uk/c/Jamie-Oliver-cook's-direct-stainless-steel-frypan-28cm/p/2100118329

I tried stainless steel based on comments like the ones in this thread, followed tips for making it non-stick, but everything stuck, waste of money.

The best investment is non metal implements.

I live with a max heat is the best heat person.. and even with an expensive stainless steel pan, eggs stick hence we still use a small tefal non-stick omelet pan for that.
 
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Soldato
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Ninja zerostick hard anodized is what you want. We cook a lot so our pots and pans get well used and these cook very well, clean easily and they still look like new.
I bought a set of those when they first came out and they were awful.
Loads of the coating came off and in the end I chucked them and went back to Circulon.
Maybe it was the first batch that was faulty?
 
Associate
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I bought a set of those when they first came out and they were awful.
Loads of the coating came off and in the end I chucked them and went back to Circulon.
Maybe it was the first batch that was faulty?
possibly, although I do believe there a few different models of zerostick, it's the hard anodized ones that are the best.
 
Associate
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Like you disappointed with my ProCook Elite Tri-Ply Frying Pan. Decided to take some advice in this thread and get stainless steel. I was going to order Le Creuset but in the end opted for a British manufacturer so ordered two Samuel Groves Tri-Ply Stainless Steel frying pans.
 
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Soldato
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London
Stainless steel pans ftw - but as a general rule, cook at low heat.

For example:
  • A fried egg - cook at low temp. - it won't stick.
  • A curry sauce - cook at low/medium temp - it won't stick.
  • A sirloin steak - cook at high inially, before turning down/off to add butter to baste etc. - it will stick at first, so you get the maillard reaction. Reducing the heat will help deglaze the pan.
 
Man of Honour
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I think the only non-stick pans I have ever used that lasted well were some old-school Tefal Armatal range, and a random M&S small frying pan. Everything else has not held up well.

So I use a stainless steel fry pan with a cast iron skillet-type smaller pan and just enjoy not worrying.
 
Associate
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Ninja zerostick hard anodized is what you want. We cook a lot so our pots and pans get well used and these cook very well, clean easily and they still look like new.
I bought a set of those when they first came out and they were awful.
Loads of the coating came off and in the end I chucked them and went back to Circulon.
Maybe it was the first batch that was faulty?
possibly, although I do believe there a few different models of zerostick, it's the hard anodized ones that are the best.
Odd, we got the stainless steel one, 30cm I think, it's been good as gold so far. Not that I go crazy and try to cook a steak in it though, I have heavy cast pans for that.
12 months old ish now!
IMG-0009-Copy.jpg
 
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