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Nvme SSD or Sata SDD for my motherboard

Discussion in 'Storage Drives' started by Minusorange, Apr 29, 2018.

  1. Minusorange

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 25, 2005

    Posts: 2,360

    Running a Gigabyte-UD4H trying to figure out if it's better/cost efficient to just run a Sata SSD or buy an M2+Pcie4x adapter

    From what I've found running in PCIe wouldn't get me native M2 speeds as my board is too old to support natively so is it worth the extra over a conventional SSD considering pcie will need time to initialise on boot ?

    Obviously there's the consideration that when I come to retire my 4770k rig, the m2 will likely be native on whatever mobo I get so there's that but is there that much difference in speeds between m2/sata for just running an OS boot drive ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
  2. mrbazmondo

    Hitman

    Joined: Apr 10, 2008

    Posts: 910

    I've not seen any PCIe NVMe adaptors that allow you to boot yet.
     
  3. Minusorange

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 25, 2005

    Posts: 2,360

    https://www.intel.com/content/dam/s...-ssds/NVMe_Boot_Guide_332098-001US_Rev1-1.pdf

    It should be possible, the thread I found on another forum with my same motherboard seemed to work with PCIe adapter

    I just need to know if it's worth the hassle or should I save the £20+ cost of the adapter and just go with SATA instead ?

    Apologies I meant M2 vs Sata not Nvme
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
  4. rotor

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 18, 2012

    Posts: 2,080

    If it's only £20 and works, why not? An NVMe is vastly more future-proof that a SATA is.
     
  5. Minusorange

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 25, 2005

    Posts: 2,360

    Is the future proofing worth paying nearly almost double though ?

    This is coming from someone who still needs motherboards with the old PCI slots :(
     
  6. rotor

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 18, 2012

    Posts: 2,080

    In that case get a cheap SATA for the meantime. The trouble is, once you upgrade your motherboard (or assuming it is actually compatible with a PCIe NVMe adapter) then the money spent on the SATA drive is kind of down the drain. A SATA drive does 600MBps, whereas an NVMe drive does 2000+MBps, so it's quite a big difference.
     
  7. Minusorange

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 25, 2005

    Posts: 2,360

    That's not too much of an issue with the sata could just be relegated to general storage/backup, think I'll stick with sata for now to cut costs I've lasted this long without any SSD so I'm sure I won't be missing that 2000+mbps speed for a long time (only interested in SSD's now the prices are a little more reasonable)
     
  8. Pocah

    Suspended

    Joined: Jul 11, 2017

    Posts: 819

    I think the UD4H was 87 only, wasn't it? If that's the case then it doesn't have an M.2 socket which means there is no BIOS support for a PCIe drive. Now you can still use one and it WILL achieve full speed, 3000+ , if the adapter is placed in the slot directly below the graphics card, but the driver will be in Windows NOT the BIOS so you can't boot from it. As such, I wouldn't really bother, I would just get a standard SATA SSD.
     
  9. Minusorange

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 25, 2005

    Posts: 2,360

    Figured it wasn't worth the hassle, will get a normal sata and be done with it