Online maths A-level

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Has anyone done this before? I have a degree in Economics but many jobs I'm applying to want a maths A-level. I'm looking for the fastest way to get one. I found this course which is 395 and can be done at your own pace, you send in your work and it gets graded:

http://www.openstudycollege.com/courses/a-level-maths.html

and I think you can take the exams fast as you want, sending them in the post (which seems weird). It seems pretty legit though. Has anyone done something similar or used this site?
 
Soldato
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I learnt A-level maths mostly from a textbook, and there are various free online resources to help with the content (khan academy springs to mind). Dishing out £395 seems a bit steep to me for some Maths A-level education but then again I'm still a student so...
 

AJK

AJK

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You don't do the exams and send them in the post, you have to go to an exam centre to take them.

I've never done an A-Level like this so don't know much about it I'm afraid. I don't really understand why you need the A-Level if you have an economics degree though... why do companies insist on that?
 
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If I read the website correctly you may be better off just buying the text books, using online resources, and booking the exams with AQA.

Note: I am assuming that the "assignment marking and feedback" relates to assignments they have personally created, and do not have any weighting towards the final result.
 
Soldato
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Surely the fact that you have a degree in economics will override the level of maths you need for most non science based jobs? I'm studying economics at uni now and most of the maths covered at a-level which is needed in business is covered throughout an economics degree. Can you not just explain this to any prospective employers?
 

Hxc

Hxc

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Surely the fact that you have a degree in economics will override the level of maths you need for most non science based jobs? I'm studying economics at uni now and most of the maths covered at a-level which is needed in business is covered throughout an economics degree. Can you not just explain this to any prospective employers?

Employers are odd. UCAS points count a lot for whatever reason.
 
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Surely the fact that you have a degree in economics will override the level of maths you need for most non science based jobs? I'm studying economics at uni now and most of the maths covered at a-level which is needed in business is covered throughout an economics degree. Can you not just explain this to any prospective employers?

Something you may not realise until applying for graduate roles is that a lot of online applications are filtered automatically upon submition. For this reason not having an A-level in Maths may be the difference between being and not being considered for a role.

Of course there is the possibility of contacting the employer directly, however with the sheer number of applicants to most jobs now I am unsure of how helpful they will be.
 
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Surely the fact that you have a degree in economics will override the level of maths you need for most non science based jobs? I'm studying economics at uni now and most of the maths covered at a-level which is needed in business is covered throughout an economics degree.

I agree with you generally however the level of maths in an economics degree will vary between different universities so this will not always be the case and employers may find it hard to distinguish.
 
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With a degree in economics I think you would be okay to just buy some textbooks and use free online resources.

Maybe if you contact your local college you can arrange to sit the exams there as an external candidate for a fee.
 
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Surely the fact that you have a degree in economics will override the level of maths you need for most non science based jobs? I'm studying economics at uni now and most of the maths covered at a-level which is needed in business is covered throughout an economics degree. Can you not just explain this to any prospective employers?

I've only emailed 2 of the companies but I'm not crossing my fingers, the A-level seems to count for a lot since they ask for both a 2:1 in a business/math type subject and the a-level.

If I read the website correctly you may be better off just buying the text books, using online resources, and booking the exams with AQA.

Note: I am assuming that the "assignment marking and feedback" relates to assignments they have personally created, and do not have any weighting towards the final result.
I haven't looked into booking with AQA yet but wouldn't that mean waiting until may/june for the exams?
 

AJK

AJK

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I haven't looked into booking with AQA yet but wouldn't that mean waiting until may/june for the exams?
You'll have to do this anyway, you can only take A-Level exams on the dates they are administered, it's not all year round.
 
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If you have a degree in economics then you surely have the scope to do an A-level in Maths by yourself. I self taught Further Maths while I was doing my A-levels. Just get the books, read them, look at online solutions, past papers.
 
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You'll have to do this anyway, you can only take A-Level exams on the dates they are administered, it's not all year round.

Bah..... not the news I wanted to hear! Ok I'll have to um................................. think about this then.
 
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If you have a degree in economics then you surely have the scope to do an A-level in Maths by yourself. I self taught Further Maths while I was doing my A-levels. Just get the books, read them, look at online solutions, past papers.

Yeah I think I could wipe the floor with it but waiting until May/June, I'm hoping theres some way to get the certificate faster.
 

AJK

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You have to sit the exams to get the A-Level, I'm not aware of any shortcuts. And if it's still one exam per module then it's actually a total of 6 exams (would need to check this of course), which could be a handful to take all in one academic year!

Edit - yes, it is:

Unit 1: Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
Unit 2: Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
Unit 3: Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
Unit 4: Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
Unit 5: Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
Unit 6: Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

You will need to take the standard A-Level examinations in order to fully complete this course. The examinations run on specific dates which can be obtained by visiting the AQA website. You will be required to pay for and book these examinations yourself; however, we can provide a list of A-Level test centres around the country to help you with this.
 
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Soldato
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I know that a-levels and ucas points seem to be the holy grail for graduate employers but they are rarely as strict in recruitment as their long winded application forms suggest. I don't have a-level maths or any ucas points for that matter as I did an access to higher education course instead of a-levels as a mature student. If its possible, atleast attempt to find out if employers take alternative qualifications as many of those who I have contacted are quite willing to make adjustments.
 
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Employers are odd. UCAS points count a lot for whatever reason.

I think you need to establish why they ask for them... it might be that they find good A-Level results (showing you're dedicated at studying) correlate well with sitting professional exams. Sitting extra A-Levels after you've got a degree isn't necessarily going to provide a useful indicator of anything.

I'm not sure sitting for A-Levels again is going to do much more than potentially let you bypass the initial filter then look like a bit of a plumb at the interview when you attempt to explain that you sat an A-level after your degree in order to tick a box and get past their filter...

You'd be better off picking a career and finding a way into that career - if some firms aren't open to you at the moment at entry level they could be later on - once you've got some professional experience/quals.
 
Caporegime
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@OP - if its just the maths knowledge that is required for the career you're after then why not look into an OU course or even udacity/coursera etc.. (while those two aren't credit bearing, you'll still get a certificate of sorts and more importantly the knowledge)
 
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I think you need to establish why they ask for them... it might be that they find good A-Level results (showing you're dedicated at studying) correlate well with sitting professional exams. Sitting extra A-Levels after you've got a degree isn't necessarily going to provide a useful indicator of anything.

I'm not sure sitting for A-Levels again is going to do much more than potentially let you bypass the initial filter then look like a bit of a plumb at the interview when you attempt to explain that you sat an A-level after your degree in order to tick a box and get past their filter...

You'd be better off picking a career and finding a way into that career - if some firms aren't open to you at the moment at entry level they could be later on - once you've got some professional experience/quals.

but it's these very graduate schemes I want to get on. I'm not sure what relevant experience I can get now..... and what just leave after 4 months and try apply to some schemes then? To me it seems from all these applications that Maths a-level sure does count for a lot and if I can get it by June then it seems a fairly good bet.
 
Soldato
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I did A-Level maths myself using textbooks (edexcel). I was able to complete it in one year doing 3 exams in Jan and 3 in June. Just find a school that allows for private candidates and pay the exam fees which will be about £100. I did C1-C4, S1 and M1 by the way.
 
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