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Plasterboard ceiling repairs

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by Lyle44, 21 Jan 2021.

  1. Lyle44

    Gangster

    Joined: 18 Sep 2007

    Posts: 306

    Location: Norwich

    Hello, currently in the middle of preparing the second bedroom, north facing, for redecoration and need a few pointers on how to repair a few areas of damage. Ultimately I'll be re-painting the room.

    Firstly plasterboard ceiling: I think these are the joins along each plasterboard section that require sealing over.
    [​IMG]
    From reading around, I think I need to:
    dig out the current join, add layer of filler, install scrim tape then use 2 further layers of filler, widening and feathering out with each layer (sanding between each?)
    Having already filled 60+ rawl plugs holes in this room with toupret, is there anything easier or better to use for this?

    Second is an old damp patch on the ceiling, corner of the North facing wall and flank wall. What can I use to try and remove the existing mold from the plasterboard and paint and prevent this from returning? Would I need to use a special primer on the wall(s) in this area prior to re-painting? Crack on the wall I'll try and smooth out with filler, if possible.
    [​IMG]

    Final area is some damage at the other end, adjacent to the bathroom, the ceiling corner feels solid when tapped. Anything I can do to reduce the appearance of it, short of installing coving?
    [​IMG]

    Ideally I'd have the ceiling removed and replaced, but don't have the time or money to have that carried out right now.

    Many thanks, L
     
  2. norm

    Soldato

    Joined: 21 Jan 2003

    Posts: 5,301

    Getting a plasterer in to skim over it would get the best result and save your time/sanity.

    But if you want to tackle it Gyproc Easifill is the filler of choice, and paper jointing tape for the cracks. Basically wet the tape and bed into the Easifill, then skim on top in the manner like you said.

    As for the mould you will need to cure whatever is causing the damp firstly else it'll just return. After that put a coat of Zinsser BIN that'll block the stain.
     
  3. 200sols

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 14 Jan 2018

    Posts: 8,368

    Location: Hampshire

    Easyfill 60, although getting a good finish on those joins is going to be a nightmare job.
     
  4. jaybee

    Soldato

    Joined: 10 Jul 2008

    Posts: 5,621

    You could just pay a pro plasterer to skim the whole thing for a few hundred.
     
  5. SMN

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 2 Nov 2008

    Posts: 2,481

    Location: The ether

    Skimming over those joins is just going to cause them to re-appear though, from experience. They'll need raking out and taping (per above), IMO.
     
  6. JRJ

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 21 Oct 2010

    Posts: 1,056

    How big is the ceiling? could overboard and skim or dry line
     
  7. Mercenary Keyboard Warrior

    Capodecina

    Joined: 4 Aug 2007

    Posts: 13,138

    Location: Wilds of suffolk

    Any movement in the ceiling when you push each side of the crack? If so you need to fix that first

    I am very much not a fan of tape myself, ive over the years had far more cracks along tape than it seems to prevent. For minor crack like that if it appears to simple be shrinkage ive developed a new approach and its been seamless (pun intended) of using non solvent grip fill, use a scraper to smooth it over and then wipe gently with a damp sponge after 5-10 minutes. Grip fill sets very hard and helps keep the boards together.

    As mentioned the damp unless what ever cased that was fixed you need to solve that first.

    The corner if you just mean the sort of "lumpy" bits then sand down or gouge out and fill back in.
    A wood chisel is good for that, you can normally gently chisel off the lumps and just a minor correction afterwards will fill them smooth.

    All the issues look like old shrinkage and poor decorating to me rather than structural. (the damp part excluded)
     
  8. pp111

    Perma Banned

    Joined: 22 Oct 2018

    Posts: 2,467

    Fixing cracks in a ceiling gets more and more complicated depending on what's causing the cracks. In the worst case it may not even be possible to stop them cracking again, but lets not go there first! In most cases the crack is because the full end of the board is not supported properly but it's usually enough to pap some more nails in and then tape over the crack. If that doesn't work then there are more measures you can take. I would start with the tape idea and see how it goes. Corners, well, it's no different to fixing bumps and lumps in a wall. The main issue here is the damp. Yes, you can clean it off and use a primer like zinsser bin. It's a shellac based primer. Other shellac based primers are often used as damp seal. Thompsons one coat dampseal for example. They are awesomely good! However, you really need to get up in to the loft and find out where that damp is coming from.
     
  9. Jez

    Caporegime

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 32,903

    I have loads of ceiling cracks especially in new areas of my house which have suffered shrinkage and movement since built. I was thinking about using gripfill as per your post as it is such solid stuff and easy to apply using the gun...I didn’t even consider gripfill as I’ve always used it as adhesive.

    My question...why do you specifically state non solvent? I’ve used both but very early on found the solvent stuff to be much stronger...wondered whether you tried both and found non solvent better for this purpose? :)
     
  10. Mercenary Keyboard Warrior

    Capodecina

    Joined: 4 Aug 2007

    Posts: 13,138

    Location: Wilds of suffolk

    Maybe its just the brands I have used but I have found the non solvent is far smoother and easier to use when you want to spread it, smooth it.
    I liken non solvent to be like toothpaste in use where as solvent based more like putty
     
  11. Jez

    Caporegime

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 32,903

    Makes sense, thanks for the reply and yes I can relate to the solvent stuff being more like putty now you say it. I’ve only ever used it as adhesive before so I guess I’ve never tried to smooth it down as such :)

    I’ll try the non solvent and see how I get on
     
  12. Thebug

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 17 Feb 2007

    Posts: 1,920

    Location: Walsall

    Red devil onetime is what you want for cracks, or scrim tape and easyfill
     
  13. Mr.Stu

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 2,346

    We have some similar cracks to deal with. Every option sounds like a shot in the dark. Few of the tradeys I know say they would paper over them!
     
  14. TheFew

    Gangster

    Joined: 25 Nov 2017

    Posts: 305

    Gaps around the edges of rooms are the bane of my life. He is one example, a nice 2mm gap between a plasterboard wall and the ceiling that has opened over the last couple of years.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. JRJ

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 21 Oct 2010

    Posts: 1,056

    Red devil is great, probably the best filler I've used and came recommended from this forum:D
     
  16. norm

    Soldato

    Joined: 21 Jan 2003

    Posts: 5,301

    I've got it where the paper jointing tape in the corners and around the ceiling has blown away in places, I.e. detached from the skim holding it to the plasterboard as a result of being incorrectly fitted , but yours looks like it was never taped, or the walls are sinking away from the roof joists?
     
  17. TheFew

    Gangster

    Joined: 25 Nov 2017

    Posts: 305

    Yeah. Not really sure if it was taped. Struggling to see. In that section the ceiling feels solid, so agree it may be a downward shrink. House seems to have a lot of bits of ceiling that don't seem to have been taped.
     
  18. Mercenary Keyboard Warrior

    Capodecina

    Joined: 4 Aug 2007

    Posts: 13,138

    Location: Wilds of suffolk

    Ouch that looks terrible, such a botch job, bad socket placement
    Thats a lot of movement for plasterboard
    Also some lolworthy plastering above the door there
     
  19. TheFew

    Gangster

    Joined: 25 Nov 2017

    Posts: 305

    Looking again it looks like it may have been taped. There seems to be little fingers of fabric at regular intervals. So guess the tape has popped. Ceiling seems firm, so guess it is downward movement.

    The room does suffer from an mdf floor that is very creaky and soft in places.. so that that needs replacing. When the room is revamped.

    Could the floor be causing the issue? Do stud walls sit on the floorboards?
     
  20. 200sols

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 14 Jan 2018

    Posts: 8,368

    Location: Hampshire

    Yes, if the floor has sunk then the wall will move with it.