RJ45 Help Please

Associate
Joined
29 May 2009
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230
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Leeds / Nantwich - UK
Now I am a network noob so to speak and I have a bit of a problem. I'm in my Uni halls and there is only one network port (RJ45) in the communal room meaning we can only use one laptop on the internet at a time.

Now I know it's not just as simple as getting a socket doubler because we wouldn't be able to use two laptops at the same time.

What piece of hardware would I need to be able to do this? Other than going wireless as it is against the rules for some reason. :confused:
 
Soldato
Joined
6 Sep 2008
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By the sea, West Sussex
This subject comes up time and time again at this time of year.

Firstly, you'll need to check the rules as this can tell you all lot of what you can or can't do. If the Uni allows multiple connections (don't know of many that do) then you need a network switch. If not, they may (again not very likely) allow a router. If you are definate you want to break the rules then a router is the easiest way to acheive what you are trying to dobut you'll need to ensure it's setup correctly - not something I'm 100% sure you'd be able to manage on your own as your knowledge of network seems a little sparse.

As for the wireless, that's completely understandable. They have resources and bandwidth they they need to control access to and that become extremely difficult if people setup wireless points all over the place, especially if student left them open "as it's easier or faster that way"
 
Associate
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17 May 2004
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1,585
Switch.

Is probably against the rules as if everyone puts wireless in on defaults then can lead to a lot of interference, and you even end up using the wireless in another room rather then your own.

If don't change the SSID or channel and no/default password then is quite easy for this to happen.

This is what inevitably happens.

1.) you unwrap wireless access point.
2.) you find wireless signal from laptop
3.) yo go, hey it's working job done and can access the network.
4.) next door unwraps wireless access point
5.) next door finds wirelss signal, could be there own, maybe your access point
6.) you are not impressed with drop in performance goto uni it and say must be something wrong with the network, as was working fine but recently performance dropped.
7.) next door goto unit it with same issue

This inevitably leads to lots of questions to Uni IT about how slow the network is. By just saying against the rules then saves them the effort.

Doesn't stop the IT students, however they tend to just troubleshoot the wireless themselves rather then goto the uni staff, will lock down there wireless change from defaults etc.
 
Associate
OP
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29 May 2009
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Leeds / Nantwich - UK
Thanks for your speedy reply's.

I can see what you mean about the wireless network but I have set one up at home before changed the SSID and passwords so that would not be a problem, but they are easy to detect and with it being against the rules I cannot imagine it would last long.

So a switch seams to be the way forward, I have a couple of questions though:

1) How easy is it to set up a network switch?

2) Is it easy to detect if on of these is on your network?

3) They are on OCUK for around £20 is that a good price and a good spec?
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Feb 2007
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Location
South Shields
Thanks for your speedy reply's.

I can see what you mean about the wireless network but I have set one up at home before changed the SSID and passwords so that would not be a problem, but they are easy to detect and with it being against the rules I cannot imagine it would last long.

So a switch seams to be the way forward, I have a couple of questions though:

1) How easy is it to set up a network switch?

2) Is it easy to detect if on of these is on your network?

3) They are on OCUK for around £20 is that a good price and a good spec?

A switch is plug and play. Doesnt require any setting up (as it is a dumb switch it has no way of configuring etc)
 
Soldato
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13 Sep 2003
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Glocestershire
Ask the uni IT department, they'll tell you what you're allowed to do.

Ask a computer science student, they'll know what's possible.

As said above small switches are plug and play. However the uni's network equipment might be able to tell that you've connected a switch and are connecting more then one piece of equipment. A cable router might get round this.
 
Caporegime
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16 May 2003
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::1
With a switch it'll be pretty obvious if you connect more than one device because they'll see that more than one thing is asking for an IP, if it works at all...

As suggested, a router's what you most likely want.
 
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