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Russia election: Vladimir Putin wins by big margin

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Evangelion, Mar 19, 2018.

  1. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 14,055

    Which means they found something and are still investigating. It clearly says "Work by the team to establish the significance of these results is on-going. The FFM team will continue its work to draw final conclusions.". Chlorine is used in chemical weapons and that's what they found.

    Nowhere in the report does it say they found nothing...

    Previous reports for other sites confirm the use of chemical weapons. So even if they find they didn't use them on this occasion, they still used them in this conflict and Russia still tried to cover it up. Literally no one else is siding with Russia and Syria on this.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2018
  2. ubersonic

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 26, 2009

    Posts: 20,584

    Not all are actually banned, I.E the USA routinely used White Phosphorous in Iraq/Afghanistan.


    Playing devils advocate here, chlorine is also used in Cillit Bang, does that prove Barry Scott was involved? :p
     
  3. Freakbro

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 29, 2010

    Posts: 15,594

    Location: Lincs

    And it's use is allowed if used for smoke cover and illumination not if it's being used as a targetted weapon.

    Not saying I agree with the US's innocence claims in Iraq, but it's not the same as specifically using a chemical weapon - which are all banned afaik.
     
  4. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 14,055

    No other reason to have chlorine in a bomb other than for chemical weapons.
     
  5. ubersonic

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 26, 2009

    Posts: 20,584

    Indeed, however they didn't find chlorine in a bomb they found trace of it near a bomb site, which while likely meaning it came from the bomb could just as plausibly have been there before the bomb landed.

    We know it was probably a chemical weapon attack, and Assad knows we know, however we just don't have any proof of it :(
     
  6. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 14,055

    Yep it's the same for the stuff Russia is up to. The intelligence services are well on to them and take steps to counter them behind the scenes, but don't have strong enough proof to present to the public.
     
  7. Tefal

    Capo Crimine

    Joined: Jun 30, 2007

    Posts: 66,559

    Location: Wales


    The US used it as a weapon "shake n bake," the troops called the mix of high explosive and wp rounds fired at entrenched enemies
     
  8. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 21,775

    With regards to WP with the US, they love to skirt the meaning of words that mean so very little to 90% of the population, Rumsfeld described candidly the usage of such terms, much like "enemy combatant" can mean literally anything at this point.

    So when they say they use WP in defensive measures, it's likely a bureaucratic farce. Regardless WP is pretty low on the list of seriously dementing chemicals to use on people.

    Lol, alright, or maybe that'd be too much for Joe Public (seemingly), which acts on emotional vigor rather than any sort of rational employment of thought.

    I'm frankly surprised that Russians haven't been murdered (unjustly, not that i or anyone should) for what they (Putin's band of criminal entrepreneurs) appear to be doing to us, yet Jo Cox (yes it's incredibly relevant to the political/social landscape people live in) lies in a grave for attempting to help people? How does this even compute?
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  9. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 14,055

    Because UK intelligence services don't bump people off, they never have. They buy people and they can offer them more than Russia can (a comfortable life in the west) so they don't need to.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  10. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 21,775

    I highly doubt that, in approximately 109 years, not a single person has been eliminated by the BSS for being a threat?
     
  11. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 14,055

    They didn't even send spies out to assassinate people during the war so probably not. It's not their style and anything like that would be done by special forces. MI6/MI5 are intelligence gatherers and recruiters.

    The CIA works a bit differently though. They are more military orientated.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  12. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 21,775

    What the actual ****?

    For your enigmatic and esteemed information, nations that pour money into their militaries tend to be hiding social inequalities at home.

    Big examples are North Korea, Iran, Russia, China, Egypt, Turkey and such, such great and wonderful nations.
     
  13. Colonel_Klinck

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 3, 2007

    Posts: 1,211

    Location: London, UK

    Well Putin didn’t hold back in his interview with the FT. Liberalism has failed, multiculturalism has failed, populism and nationalism is the future. If he’s right I’m heading for the suicide booth. At least he’s shown himself for the facist he is.


    Oh and traitors must be killed. Although the way it was done in Salisbury is maybe not the way to do it :mad:

    He for me is the most dangerous man in the world. He wants to bring down all of our liberal democracies and he’ll use any tactics to do it.
     
  14. Angilion

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 5, 2003

    Posts: 16,385

    Location: Just to the left of my PC

    Modern "liberals" are doing that already and they have far more power outside of Russia than Putin does. They're almost as illiberal as he is, they're far more dishonest and they're here.
     
  15. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 7,093

    Huh, nationalism is extremely dangerous and might trigger processes for next global warfare. In Germany, it's now hell for most people who don't speak German language, the only thing which saves us from them is that have no right for military development.
     
  16. Colonel_Klinck

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 3, 2007

    Posts: 1,211

    Location: London, UK

    Haha yeah ok :rolleyes:

    Are you trying to say its Germany we all need to fear? Using nerve agents, polonium on foreign soil, interfering in the elections and societies of neighbouring counties and counties around the world to divide the populations and destabilise their societies.... oh no wait thats Russia.
     
  17. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 7,093

    I am not trying. I do fear them and very responsibly and seriously tell you that something is very wrong inside of them.

    Russia has common religion and language with many countries in Eastern Europe and it's normal that the many of the Slavs respect Russia.

    Russia today works only about its internal problems to solve and doesn't push seriously on anyone outside.
     
  18. Colonel_Klinck

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 3, 2007

    Posts: 1,211

    Location: London, UK

    Seriously I think you are living in the land of make believe.
     
  19. 4K8KW10

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 7,093

    About what? About what I'm telling you about Russia or about my shares of the experiences in Germany?

    Russia, like the US and UK, has organisations in which it participates and is not alone.
    I have no idea why you tend to make your artificial enemies where they aren't any.

    The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), or Shanghai Pact,[1] is a Eurasian political, economic, and security alliance, the creation of which was announced on 15 June 2001 in Shanghai, China by the leaders of China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan; the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation Charter, formally establishing the organisation, was signed in June 2002 and entered into force on 19 September 2003. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai_Cooperation_Organisation

    Membership
    8 member states[hide]
    China
    India
    Kazakhstan
    Kyrgyzstan
    Pakistan
    Russia
    Tajikistan
    Uzbekistan
    4 observer states[hide]
    Afghanistan
    Belarus
    Iran
    Mongolia
    6 dialogue partners[hide]
    Armenia
    Azerbaijan
    Cambodia
    Nepal
    Sri Lanka
    Turkey
    4 guest attendances[hide]
    Association of Southeast Asian Nations
    Commonwealth of Independent States
    Turkmenistan
    United Nations

    And:

    The Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) [note 1] is an economic union of states located in central and northern Asia and Eastern Europe. The Treaty on the Eurasian Economic Union was signed on 29 May 2014 by the leaders of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia, and came into force on 1 January 2015.[5] Treaties aiming for Armenia's and Kyrgyzstan's accession to the Eurasian Economic Union were signed on 9 October and 23 December 2014, respectively. Armenia's accession treaty came into force on 2 January 2015.[6] Kyrgyzstan's accession treaty came into effect on 6 August 2015.[7] It participated in the EAEU from the day of its establishment as an acceding state.[8][9] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_Economic_Union
     
  20. Irish_Tom

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 12,285

    I’m not sure where your fear of Germany stems from but I can assure you that your statement “in Germany, it’s now hell for most people who don’t speak German” is incorrect.

    There’s no escaping the fact that Germany has seen a rise in nationalist populism in recent years (more so in the old East Germany than West Germany) but this is true of much of Europe, including France, Italy and the UK.

    The recent European elections saw parties like AfD lose ground to the Greens and they failed to elect their first mayor recently (in an old East German town) against a CDU party that has also lost support in recent years.

    I agree that extreme nationalism is dangerous but Germany today is not a country I’d be particularly worried about on that front. Personally I’d be looking much closer to home.