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Seascape for critique

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by Phate, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. Phate

    Caporegime

    Joined: Nov 1, 2003

    Posts: 33,647

    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    Hello all,

    Not posted anything for critique for a long time but I am feeling especially pleased with this one, and I am always looking to improve. So lets have at it!

    Yesterday we visited Praia do Magoito, a beach in Sintra. As we approached the temperature dropped and for what should have been a gorgeous sunset was interrupted by this enormous moody grey/dark cloud which I actually welcomed and relished. Coupled with it being high tide, there was a light mist in the air...some really special conditions to shoot in.

    Anyway, here it is.

    [​IMG]

    Tech details:

    Olympus E-M5 Mark II
    Olympus 7-14 f/2.8 PRO shot at 7mm
    f/8.0 for 20s
    ISO100
    Nisi 10 Stop with a Lee 2 stop hard grad. (Lee is borrowed)

    Looking forward to any and all feedback.
    :)

    Thanks
    Jake
     
  2. GSXRMovistar

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Nov 6, 2002

    Posts: 9,037

    Location: London UK

    Lovely image and well done, the only thing I would be tempted to do is clone out that small bit of seaweed/rope in the lower centre of the screen which looks like a hair on the image (plus the very tiny white spot, again centre and a couple of rows from the bottom).
     
  3. Phate

    Caporegime

    Joined: Nov 1, 2003

    Posts: 33,647

    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    Thanks GSXRMovistar!

    I see the bits you mean :) thanks for pointing those out! I try not to clone tooooo much as I find myself getting obsessed :o :D - but can take a look!
     
  4. And

    Hitman

    Joined: Dec 7, 2002

    Posts: 689

    Maybe look at getting a 6 stop ND. Something like a 2sec exposure for that image will show more detail in the waves on the beach but also give a sense of movement to them, especially if you take the image as the waves peak and start receding.
     
  5. Drollic

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 24, 2013

    Posts: 2,814

    Location: East Midlands

    I like it, especially the colors. Agree with the first comment. Personal opinion, I never think sky cropped to leave a 1/4 or less works that well. Under 1/3 is ok however. I realise you can't do much about it with that image as the rocks in the sand are quite a large foreground object :D
     
  6. Phate

    Caporegime

    Joined: Nov 1, 2003

    Posts: 33,647

    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    Thanks guys, tonight I will post a screenshot showing the full image outside the crop borders, would be interesting to see what you think with what is available :)
     
  7. jonneymendoza

    Capodecina

    Joined: Apr 7, 2008

    Posts: 13,294

    The ojkh way I could improve yahg would be to shoot wider as the foreground subject takes up a lot of the frame but other than that.its excellent
     
  8. Quartz

    Soldato

    Joined: Apr 1, 2014

    Posts: 5,899

    Location: Aberdeen

    Don't clone out the seaweed: it makes the picture look more real.
     
  9. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 28,372

    For me, I would have used a fast exposure and captured the details in the sea, that would make it far more interesting than the over done long exposure sea scapes that are very flat and unimaginative. This is especially important in this instance since the horizon is dull.

    Biggest critique would be the composition. The band of ricks points strong to the top right of the image, almost taking my eyes outside the frame. But there is nothing at the top right to look at. This then creates a lot of dead space on the top left, and there is no easy way to direct the gaze back there
     
  10. Sonea Fifer

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 13, 2006

    Posts: 6,677

    Location: On the forest moon Endor

    Liking the LE shot Phate :)

    You asked for critique:

    As subtle as it is the thin red band of sunlight really makes this image for me - you've got a fantastic tonal range here with good leading lines and there is sharpness and definition on the rocks and sand in the foreground.

    Personally speaking I would like to have seen the shadows lifted slightly on the cliffs to the left of your composition - but it would have to be subtle, too much and it will appear over cooked. That is the only part of the entire composition that I feel really lets it down. Having said that it still does not detract from the fact you've caught a cracking LE seascape there ;)
     
  11. Phate

    Caporegime

    Joined: Nov 1, 2003

    Posts: 33,647

    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    Yes a 6 stop and possibly even a 4 stop at some point is on the long list of filters to get...so many! I do agree that a 10 stop can at times be overkill.

    If I am understanding you correctly, you mean a fast exposure with no motion blur at all?

    If so, then ultimately, this wasn't the mood or look I was looking to achieve. However, I agree totally with your comments on the composition. :)

    Thanks for this, really appreciate the feedback! I am a big fan of that pink/orange glow from the sun creeping through the horizon as well. I tried to emphasise this a bit during the processing stage. I shall try to work with the cliffs a bit to make them more noticeable but not stand out!

    For those who have been mentioning the composition, here is a screenshot showing the full captured image, all discussion welcome surrounding this. I've played with the crop quite a bit, and find myself somewhat undecided on the whole subject!

    [​IMG]

    Cheers!
    Jake
     
  12. Sonea Fifer

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 13, 2006

    Posts: 6,677

    Location: On the forest moon Endor

    There's not much else I feel I can add to what has already been said Phate - you know what you're doing and you know how to achieve the end results you're after.

    Looking at your crop - the only thing I would suggest is try to picture your next shot (if circumstances allow) in your minds eye before you take it and then there will be no need to crop and no loss of information ;)
     
  13. olv

    Soldato

    Joined: Jan 12, 2005

    Posts: 5,136

    Location: london

    I really like the colour and tones but confused by the composition. Why did you shoot it at 7mm and then crop it so heavily? To me that suggests you just pointed it wide without knowing exactly what you were going for. You’ve lost a lot of resolution too where you could have just zoomed.
     
  14. Quartz

    Soldato

    Joined: Apr 1, 2014

    Posts: 5,899

    Location: Aberdeen

    That's a good point. I imagine the image we see is not the full resolution image but has been significantly cut down and compressed.
     
  15. Phate

    Caporegime

    Joined: Nov 1, 2003

    Posts: 33,647

    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    You're right - The composition is my biggest challenge when approaching these scenes and locations. I am feeling minor improvements each time. When I approached this scene in particular I got fixated on the look I wanted. I need to take a step back and rereview once I am in position and ask myself a 2nd time.

    See above. :)
     
  16. TheOracle

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Sep 30, 2005

    Posts: 9,515

    I like the photo how it is. Never a fan of photoshopping stuff out, although I can understand the point. You'd never know when to stop removing all the blips and blobs.

    Looks awesome!
     
  17. Screeeech

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Dec 29, 2014

    Posts: 2,400

    Location: Farnham, Surrey

    My critique would be as follows;

    Technically, there's something off with the whole image - I think it's down to a loss of contrast in the outer 2/3rds of the image circle, when I looked at the technical details it's says it was shot at 7mm!, I don't imagine a lens exists that will produce an even amount of light transmission through the image circle @ 7mm, there are only a couple of lenses at 16mm which will do that. Especially in darker scenes where the light falloff will contribute to the loss of contrast.

    For me the crop has the wrong dimensions, images like this are either suited to a more square 5x4 ratio, or a super-wide panoramic 6x12 or 6x17 ratio, the image as presented doesn't work for me with that crop.

    The rock is nice, but that's where it ends for me - I like the stormy element, it has atmosphere - I just think it's missing the mark for me personally.

    The brutal truth is, there are lots and lots of shots like this - of a rock in a foreground with blurred misty water, in order to stand out they have to be technically perfect as a baseline, to standout they do take a lot of effort.

    If I were to approach this shot - I'd do the following;

    • Shoot longer, 14-16mm minimum
    • Shoot an almost square crop
    • Portrait composition
    • Position the camera looking more out to sea, removing the shore on the top left
    • Low angle near the start of the rock, focusing on those nice patterns in the sand
    • Have enough sky to make it look gloomy
    • Maximum 5-6 second exposure, don't want to turn the sea to mist so much.
    • Shoot to scale - get the crop right in the camera as best you can.
    I don't mean to be too harsh, just being as honest as I can :p
     
  18. Phate

    Caporegime

    Joined: Nov 1, 2003

    Posts: 33,647

    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    I will reply properly later on and really value the feedback, but remember 7mm for me is 14mm for the rest of the world outside of m43 :)
     
  19. Drollic

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 24, 2013

    Posts: 2,814

    Location: East Midlands

    Re the crop, I think you've done pretty well given the subject matter. I agree it doesn't quite work fully, but that's mainly due to the rocks being such a long and narrow foreground subject, they're just awkward.