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Spurring off of a boiler circuit

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by psd99, 12 Oct 2021.

  1. ZG002

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 Jul 2004

    Posts: 10,905

    Location: Up north in Sunderland

    Because he's a plumber and not an electrician? Do you have heating controls? Or do you just turn the boiler on and off to control your heating?
     
  2. BUDFORCE

    Mobster

    Joined: 3 May 2012

    Posts: 4,293

    Just run an inline fuse on the spur.
     
  3. psd99

    Soldato

    Joined: 7 Sep 2008

    Posts: 5,430

    what do u mean by controls?

    It is an old school on and off wickes thing on the wall
    Comes on twice a day as per the settings
     
  4. ZG002

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 Jul 2004

    Posts: 10,905

    Location: Up north in Sunderland

    Controls as in programmable room stat.

    Currently it working off of a internal clock and gets it's power from a socket outlet.

    So when your house gets upto temp it just keeps pumping out that heat.
     
  5. psd99

    Soldato

    Joined: 7 Sep 2008

    Posts: 5,430

    Yep pretty much i think

    its an old system boiler about 5/6 years old
    Do all boilers come with plugs? Lol
     
  6. curlyzoo2002

    Associate

    Joined: 14 Sep 2017

    Posts: 15

    Plumbers like plugs because when they pull them out they know the boiler is dead. Electricians normally use fused connection units (FCU). If the FCU is connected correctly then there is no problem using one, the problem arises when someone wires it up wrong because the switch or fuse only interrupts 1 pole, this has to be the live pole.

    Anyway if it is a dedicated boiler circuit and its a gas boiler then it will be fine to spur from it however if you have to ask this question i recommend that you don't and instead hire someong like an electrician who knows what they are doing
     
  7. a1ex2001

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Mar 2005

    Posts: 14,746

    Location: Here and There...

    It is permitted to have a boiler plugged in but it should be to a socket without a switch so you have to physically pull the plug to isolate it. This is because a plug socket only switches the live where a fuses spur switches both live and neutral.
     
  8. b0rn2sk8

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Mar 2003

    Posts: 9,727

    A 5/6 year old boiler isn’t old by any stretch. It’s also normal for boilers to be on plugs or switched fused units, in the normal ring main or have their own circuit (which would normally be a radial rather than a ring if it’s just going to one appliance).


    My advice would be to get an electrician, or at least post some pictures or wiring diagrams so people have a chance of giving some sound advice. Lots of post in here already contradict each other.
     
  9. 413x

    Capodecina

    Joined: 13 Jan 2010

    Posts: 23,727

    Location: Llaneirwg

    no. But have a set of 4 sockets running from it and a micro server.
     
  10. psd99

    Soldato

    Joined: 7 Sep 2008

    Posts: 5,430

    So funnily enough the circuit in question is not what i got told…

    it basically a single socket that has a plug running to the kitchen extractor hood lol

    good news to be honest as i did not want to mess around with the boiler circuit. This is just the hood and kitchen sockets as far as I know.


    So one single socket with a plug in currently
    Should i change that to a double socket for the led light to have a plug on or would a junction box be better here?

    thoughts? And what amp should the plug be?

    24 v led striplights with a driver and wireless controller setup
     
  11. BUDFORCE

    Mobster

    Joined: 3 May 2012

    Posts: 4,293

    If you are talking about the fuse in the plug that's on the 240ac side then I think 3 amp fuse are generally the smallest common ones, that'll be plenty.

    You can get even lower fuses for plugs, you'd have to work out the power draw on the LED lights though, it might tell you, probably could go like .5amp or something but it's kinda overkill protection, 3amp fuse will be fine.
     
  12. psd99

    Soldato

    Joined: 7 Sep 2008

    Posts: 5,430

  13. LuckyBenski

    Soldato

    Joined: 28 Dec 2017

    Posts: 6,003

    Location: London

    It's a Class 2 device which means it's double insulated - the entire shell is plastic. This means there's nothing conductive which the user could touch, that needs earthing for their safety. Look in the photo for the square-inside-a-square logo. That means double insulated.
    Can I be really clear here: Fuses are ****-all to do with protecting humans from electrocution. Do not make the mistake of associating fuses with shock safety.

    A fuse takes a good amount of time at a certain amount (tens of %) over its limit, to burn out. The current needed to harm or instantly kill a human is mA (milliamps). Whole amps would mean you're being fried, cooked.

    - Fuses protect the cable leading to an appliance.

    - MCBs in the fuse box protect the cables in your walls/floor etc.

    - Protecting a device from too much current is down to what's inside the device (often another fuse chosen by the manufacturer)

    RCD devices protect humans by detecting even the tiniest current travelling down to earth. In a properly working circuit the current is flowing from live to neutral and earth is not part of the circuit at all.
     
  14. BUDFORCE

    Mobster

    Joined: 3 May 2012

    Posts: 4,293

    It's the risk of fire following a short.

    Don't sit in the bath and drop your toaster in.
     
  15. 200sols

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 14 Jan 2018

    Posts: 9,757

    Location: Hampshire

    Yeah, but these days you see tiny cable with a 13a fuse, tbh they just seem to stick 13a fuses in everything when 3/5 would be more than adequate.
     
  16. gpuerrilla

    Capodecina

    Joined: 21 Jul 2005

    Posts: 15,018

    Location: N.Ireland

    I remember reading same when I wanted to spur off one in the loft as it was less work. I spoke to the spark who installed and as he was returning to install other work a few weeks later he said he would do it (and he took spur off another socket in the ring).
     
  17. psd99

    Soldato

    Joined: 7 Sep 2008

    Posts: 5,430

    good point indeed
    Why though?
     
  18. curlyzoo2002

    Associate

    Joined: 14 Sep 2017

    Posts: 15

    Is this in the gas Regs because I haven't seen that in BS7671
     
  19. K.C. Leblanc

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 13 Sep 2003

    Posts: 8,188

    Location: Glocestershire

    Also sometimes although not dangerous shorting between neutral and earth can cause an RCD to trip which in some cases could plunge the whole house into darkness.
     
  20. curlyzoo2002

    Associate

    Joined: 14 Sep 2017

    Posts: 15

    seen that happen loads of time, it's always a plumber spring from a single socket to feed a boiler. it doesn't show up untill I do my testing before a board change.