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Stay 65" or go 75" shortlist of 3

Discussion in 'Home Cinema & Hi-Fi' started by EddScott, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. Amp34

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 25, 2005

    Posts: 27,017

    Location: Canada

    It’s a shame they didn’t test the Sony OLED with it as presumably it has the same processor.

    I may be a bit bias as I just picked up the 65” B7 this morning. I’m not sure how a 75” would fit into the average UK living too!
     
  2. Mal X

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 25, 2009

    Posts: 7,178

    yea my 55'' plasma is about 8ft away........ and it could easily be another 10'' bigger at that range
     
  3. Mal X

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 25, 2009

    Posts: 7,178

    i've not seen an LED better than my Panny plasma, so yea you're right.......the LED only looks better (argueably) because it's on 4K so it's a sharper image. if there was a 4k Panny plasma around now, it would be MILES BETTER than any LED
     
  4. jpaul

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 2,744

    The sony presentations on volumetric colour, are quite compelling (posted earlier) where under brighter viewing environments the LED preserves the colour quality at higher brightness levels (effectively the converse of the oled charcteristics)
    The pro calibration tools are not yet able to measure this, so it does not yet feature stongly in reviews (even Vincents).

    I think it is down to viewing environment, as to which technology works for folks, the stereotype (?) of family viewing being folks multi-tasking with one eye on a TV and another on a phone/tablet suggest that for that demographic, viewing environmnet is not complete darkness, so both technologies are competitive.

    Vincent's presentation on (HDR) tone mapping technology across Sony/Panasonic/LG oled, would be important for me in an Oled choice.
     
  5. crinkleshoes

    Sgarrista

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    Location: Ongar

    have to lol @ someone thinking 700-750 nits brightness requires darkness
     
  6. jpaul

    Mobster

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  7. VincentHanna

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 30, 2013

    Posts: 10,056

    I "upgraded" my Panasonic 55" VT50 Plasma in 2014 to a 58" Panasonic AX802b LED, and it wasn't an upgrade at all. Wish I'd not jumped on the 4K train so early, but lesson learnt.

    I've had my 65" B6 OLED for a year now and it's a true successor to Plasma. It's by far the best TV i've ever had and there was no buyers remorse.
     
  8. crinkleshoes

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 9, 2009

    Posts: 8,357

    Location: Ongar

    Yeah, my Samsung 8000 series was a downgrade from my GT30 - despite 4x the pixel count, higher brightness and HDR support.

    Still happy with my B7 :)
     
  9. Amp34

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 25, 2005

    Posts: 27,017

    Location: Canada

    10,000 nits is all very well but considering I wear sunglasses almost every day, I don’t feel like wearing them to watch TV. :p

    We have our TV set to 30% brightness and rtings have their B7 set to 17% so extra brightness isn’t necessarily essential, depending on environment. We do have the TV set up in our basement with only a 3”x3” window which faces a fence and multiple sets of dimmable light however, so we generally watch in ambience similar to a cinema (just some heavily dimmed spots behind up) and even during the day its never that bright.

    Flashing between bright and dark scenes is almost blinding as it is with “just” the 700-1000 nits, but then it’s all about the contrast ratio as well which is where OLED excels.
     
  10. jpaul

    Mobster

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    The nitty gritty if you did not look at the earlier link

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Amp34

    Caporegime

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    A good example of what I was talking about too, I’d be wearing sunglasses in that scenario in real life or I be squinting. The 300k nits location would leave a burn on my retina for at least a few seconds (much like glancing at the 10k nit fluorescent tube does).

    It’s probably worth mentioning that much like eyesight different peoples eyes are more sensitive to light than others. Those with light coloured eyes (blue, grey, green) are generally more sensitive to light than those with dark eye colours. That is mitigated, in part, by pupil dilation.

    Which leads on to the next point. What we are in fact discussing is dynamic range and contrast, not brightness per se, because the eye regulates the pupil based on available light. That means if you’re in a darker room then you don’t need the same actual brightness to see the same relative effect (your pupil will just change size to average it out).

    And that is why having truly black blacks makes a difference. Depending on the ambient light in the tv is sat in you don’t need anywhere near as much brightness to get the same contrast and dynamic range.

    As an example, if we take the flower picture, the brightest point is only 100x brighter/more intense than the darkest point, so in a pitch black room with a truly black pixels you may well only need 100 nits to get the same effect as being outside. Your pupils may well make up the difference.

    Edit: And which link are you talking about?
     
  12. hornetstinger

    Mobster

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    you mean you don't want HDR to be 100% accurate to the sun when watching "sunshine"

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qPaSdkdiNh4/maxresdefault.jpg
     
  13. crinkleshoes

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    Have to lol at that comparison... we don't want full sun-like brightness in our eyes because we won't be able to see anything else.

    The point of HDR is to see more within the comfortably viewable spectrum, not to blind us for a few seconds so we can't see the darker areas or perhaps even the screen itself for a few seconds.

    The 1000 nit LCD was already too bright at times... these arguments get really silly.
     
  14. Amp34

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 25, 2005

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    In short. Yes :p

    Looking at that second example again (the car image), outside of the blinding flash of light from the car driving past, that entire scene can be output at the same relative brightness and dynamic range on a set with less than 2000 nits. That’s if the HDR camera can in fact record the variance in the first place.

    What’s more important is the number of brightness and colour steps between true black and white, hence why colour depth is important.

    Out of interest what is the dynamic range of an HDR video camera anyway?
     
  15. crinkleshoes

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    42
     
  16. Beansprout

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Jan 31, 2004

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    Location: Plymouth

    My helpful input to this is that tonight I watched the final half of Stranger Things 2 in the dark on my 65" LG B7 and it was brilliant, but I wanted 2 things:

    1 - to sit closer than 9ft away (so I moved the sofa)
    2 - a bigger screen

    But...I don't think I'd buy a bigger screen but sacrifice OLED (hence why I got the 65" LG tho I have space and viewing distance for 75"+) - the OLED picture quality was awesome.

    And it was easily bright enough and also dark enough, I've no idea what this nits chat is all about!
     
  17. Mal X

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 25, 2009

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    LED technology has too many faults that cant be corrected it always will have, the OLED is so superior that you can't buy anything else, but there is no rush to buy one because because my Plasma is still excellent at night.
     
  18. Besty

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 2,704

    it’s fairly easy to get a side by side test as both sets are sony e.g pcworld superstore.

    there is lots of talk here about technical tests and such however subjectively this 75inch lcd from sony is in the same ballpark pq wise as the A1 OLED when viewed side by side from a 4k source playing the film ‘passengers’.
     
  19. crinkleshoes

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    In a store maybe... at home no... no LCD will represent the proper blacks of the space shots.
     
  20. Besty

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    6 years of watching a plasma every day and i never thought the blacks affected my viewing experience and they still don’t now. yep my A1 has true black but i very rarely watch in darkness.

    oleds black level has not affected my viewing experience as much as HDR.

    if you can’t see big difference on what is important to you in the showroom it’s not worth fussing over and so other considerations come into play such as - screen size.

    like i said earlier i would trade the 75 sony for ny 65 oled no problem at all but i need a bigger room.
     


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