Tesla Model Y

Soldato
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
4,511
Location
Nottingham
I've this morning had an email to confirm my pre-delivery details and can now see the finance options. No confirmed date but looks like things are progressing.

Does anyone have an idea of the typical gap between being asked for your pre-delivery info and getting the car?
 
Last edited:
Associate
Joined
8 Aug 2003
Posts
2,489
Location
Cambridge(ish)
I've got the same email and trying to decide what to do. We have a 3 that we are happy enough with so no rush to move to a Y but since I dumped Facebook I've lost track of where the cars are with specs these days.

Assume these would be China cars?
What battery on the LR? Is it worth waiting to get an updated/larger battery?
Seen something about 2022 spec with double glazed rear windows and AMD chip, would that be in these cars?
Anything else of interest that I've missed not paying attention in the last year?
 
Soldato
Joined
9 Mar 2003
Posts
10,763
I think the best you can say is that they will be at least the same as what was delivered to Europe last quarter. They will certainly be made in China.

The long range from China comes with the slightly smaller LG battery, there are rumours of that being increased in size slightly to match the Panasonic (extra 20 miles WLTP). Pretty minor but not to be sniffed at.

Other potential updates include:
AMD chip
Revised rear windows
Swap to lithium low voltage battery (who cares?)

Personally I wouldn’t worry about the window change. The model 3 had no tangible difference when the fronts changed.

I knew about the AMD chip change before I got mine, I’m not sure if I’m bothered or not. I’ve not played the games or used the web browser so I don’t know how much difference it would make day to day. It could limit potential future updates though.

There isn’t really anyway to know if any of these updates have happened until people start getting them.

Supposedly everything should be switching to their new cell form factor but who knows when that will be in reality.


Indeed it is. They'd be far better off selling the same thing year after year as the fast moving market makes their product less relevant and saleable.

Not really sure what you mean? The opposite should be the case, the more the car is updated, the more appealing it is to potential buyers against the competition. Ever couple of months it seems a new ‘Tesla Killer’ is launched.

In reality your average car buyer doesn’t care if they get Intel or AMD or would notice if the rear doors were laminated or not.

Most people are more bothered by perceived range and what number plate it has and if it’s the latest one issued by the DVLA or not.
 
Associate
Joined
8 Aug 2003
Posts
2,489
Location
Cambridge(ish)
I think the best you can say is that they will be at least the same as what was delivered to Europe last quarter. They will certainly be made in China.

The long range from China comes with the slightly smaller LG battery, there are rumours of that being increased in size slightly to match the Panasonic (extra 20 miles WLTP). Pretty minor but not to be sniffed at.

Other potential updates include:
AMD chip
Revised rear windows
Swap to lithium low voltage battery (who cares?)

Personally I wouldn’t worry about the window change. The model 3 had no tangible difference when the fronts changed.

I knew about the AMD chip change before I got mine, I’m not sure if I’m bothered or not. I’ve not played the games or used the web browser so I don’t know how much difference it would make day to day. It could limit potential future updates though.

There isn’t really anyway to know if any of these updates have happened until people start getting them.

Supposedly everything should be switching to their new cell form factor but who knows when that will be in reality.




Not really sure what you mean? The opposite should be the case, the more the car is updated, the more appealing it is to potential buyers against the competition.

In reality your average car buyer doesn’t care if they get Intel or AMD or would notice if the rear doors were laminated or not.

Most people are more bothered by perceived range and what number plate it has and if it’s the latest one issued by the DVLA or not.

Thanks for the info & I'll let you decide how much sarcasm was intended with my comment ;)
 
Soldato
Joined
5 Apr 2009
Posts
22,707
There's definitely something to be said for the 'legacy' process of more defined 'Model Year' updates, rather than ad-hoc continual change, with the consumer left guessing what specification product they might actually get.
 
Soldato
Joined
26 Aug 2012
Posts
3,858
Location
North West
There's definitely something to be said for the 'legacy' process of more defined 'Model Year' updates, rather than ad-hoc continual change, with the consumer left guessing what specification product they might actually get.

They will get what they ordered or what they ordered with additional or better stuff. No one is going to be worse off. Continuous improvement is a much better model. The only potential loss is residual value can be more difficult to manage when variables are unknown.

My last Model S I bought just before they upgraded the MCU and it screwed me in terms of resale value.
 
Soldato
Joined
9 Mar 2003
Posts
10,763
Thanks for the info & I'll let you decide how much sarcasm was intended with my comment ;)

Hate to break it to you but sarcasm rarely translates to the forum format, hence the first person to read the post took what you wrote not as intended. Most people at least give it a ;)


There's definitely something to be said for the 'legacy' process of more defined 'Model Year' updates, rather than ad-hoc continual change, with the consumer left guessing what specification product they might actually get.

In reality they have slipped more into the world of model years and bigger updates. The last major change was back in 2020.

I wouldn’t call cramming in a few extra KWH into a battery pack which is what happened to the Model 3 RWD last quarter.

If you ordered a car with a 270 mile WLTP and the car turned up with a slightly bigger battery and a 300 mile WLTP rating, your not going to be disappointed.

Likewise, if you ordered a car with an upgraded sound system and reversing camera but then the car delivered didn’t have those features and they charged you the same price, it’s understandable that you’d be ****** off but that’s not what is happening here.

It’s harder to look at the cars specification on the used market I’ll give you that and some changes could change the residuals of older cars but that is no different to making changes for each model year. Other manufacturers facelift their cars all the time and that impacts the value of older cars between those facelifts.
 
Soldato
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Posts
14,601
Location
Shakespeare’s County
My view is if you want black window surrounds in legacy world the spec list normally allows a black pack - rather than waiting for an update.

And if you want to balance NVH against segment and cost then you know where you are with the product at the design phase rather than adding laminated glass in later based on poor performance, yet its lapped us upgrades its really a case that the orginal spec only has a hygiene level of noise isolation.

Thats my view/opinion anyway.

Im looking forward to peoples views on the Model Y - also interesting to see if any ride tuning ahead of UK release to abate the hard riding critism ive read online.
 

EVH

EVH

Don
Joined
11 Mar 2004
Posts
30,150
Location
Wales
The wife wants the Y after being in my 3.

She currently has a Q3 with some epic residual value (low mileage), which will put this in her price bracket.
 
Soldato
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
12,014
Location
West Midlands
I much prefer the continual improvement as it allows upgrades and poor choices to be sorted and not continue with them for say, 9 more months, just because it's not the next MY yet.

Batteries, motors, sensors, cameras, and other fast moving technology seems the obvious way to do it, I guess most 'old school' manufacturers can't do it though as they aren't as vertically integrated and they have a huge supply chain delay to deal with, thus much more cumbersome.
 
Top Bottom