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The Conservative Party: Where do we go from here?

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Gigabit, Jun 10, 2017.

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  1. Top_gun

    Gangster

    Joined: Jun 21, 2017

    Posts: 217

    Location: London

    Looks like the Tories are trying to appeal to the younger voters judging by Damian Green's comments over scrapping student loans over the weekend. Can the Tories woo the younger voters? Personally, I doubt it. I'm struck by how many of young people have mature political views.
     
  2. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 68,515

    From what I've seen currently those younger people with any idea of politics seem to be largely holding centrist views with a minority but not insignificant number left leaning. However most say they can't find any identity at all with the established political parties.
     
  3. Top_gun

    Gangster

    Joined: Jun 21, 2017

    Posts: 217

    Location: London

    I'm based in London and I live in an area attracting lots of young people, particularly of the hipster variety. I'd say they are leaning to the left and some have been involved in communist discussions.

    Edited sentence as it was sloppy English.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2017
  4. Gigabit

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 9, 2012

    Posts: 11,778

    I don't think there is any way the Tories can win over younger voters. I think they're long gone after years of austerity. I can't see how lower tuition fees (they're never going to make them free) are going to suddenly undo all that.

    I see Hammond is saying a public sector pay-rise is not possible. This Government is just shooting itself in the foot day after day.
     
  5. Rilot

    Don

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 20,116

    Location: Wargrave, UK

    I'm wondering if the Tories think that PS workers don't vote for them anyway, and therefore it doesn't affect their election chances if they stick to the 1%.
     
  6. do_ron_ron

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 23, 2002

    Posts: 10,099

    They are wedded to the laughable trickle down economic theory and to do otherwise would mean the proposed cuts for high earners would have to be stopped as some MP have been saying today.
     
  7. Rilot

    Don

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 20,116

    Location: Wargrave, UK

    I work in the public sector and so am affected by this (although this was entirely by choice and I knew what I was getting in to when I signed up). There is a serious issue with some salaries in the PS in general.
    Take my role for example. I look after a public sector establishment's IT systems. This is around 1100PCs, 1400 users, 7 or so servers, a bunch of VMs, 40+ MFDs, 40+ switches, 250 tablets, etc etc etc. I work in a team of two. We are paid 25% more than minimum wage.
    Now, I knew this when I took the role and I accepted the 75% reduction in salary in order to work very close to home and in a non-commercial environment that wouldn't try to fire me every time my Multiple Sclerosis flares up. However, this salary is so far away from what someone in the private sector gets paid for a similar role it's not even funny. If I didn't have serious medical issues I wouldn't even consider this role for the salary paid. Recruitment is a MASSIVE issue. People with skills just aren't willing to do the job for the money paid.
     
  8. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 16,519

    Same here. Everyone is pretty ****** off that their wages have been frozen for years (including the military, who we work closely with). Yet MPs have received whopping rises, their pensions have not been touched and they get to basically live off expenses. Then May comes along and says we have to live within our means...

    Politicians have this crazy idea that they run the country. But it's actually the public sector that does the work. If they/we decide to walk the country grinds to a halt. They are just the mouthpiece.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  9. dalehitchy1

    Perma Banned

    Joined: Sep 6, 2011

    Posts: 1,726

    To be honest I agree with Mays 'We need to live within our means' to an extent. It's when you remember that MP's have had massive pay rises in that time frame. It's when you remember that £1bn is being used as a bribe.

    How dare may tell people to live within their means when she is the one not doing it.
     
  10. Uther

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 16, 2005

    Posts: 12,172

    Well no MP has been harmed during the 'austerity years' and I certainly don't feel like 'we are all in this together' one of Cameron's catchphrases, before he ran off to make a mint elsewhere.
    I am amazed there hasn't been a general strike, but people seem quite happy to let this corrupt government do anything it can to hold on to power.
     
  11. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 16,519

    I think we do very much need a general strike right now. They need to be reminded who holds the real power.
     
  12. StriderX

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 25,393

    The Banks? Which contribute about half the economy? and which won't join a general strike?
     
  13. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 16,519

    They banks don't make any money if no one is paying in to them :p
     
  14. Pudney

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 6, 2005

    Posts: 5,554

    Location: Essex

    Yes they will make lots of money. Individuals don't make money for them. There'd be an issue if everyone withdrew their money at the same time but that isn't what you said.
     
  15. Outcast

    Mobster

    Joined: Jan 25, 2008

    Posts: 2,909

    Location: Peterboro, Distro:Ubuntu

    Make the Moggster PM and he'll win em over !

    The guy Rocks
     
  16. Top_gun

    Gangster

    Joined: Jun 21, 2017

    Posts: 217

    Location: London

    Looks like he's the Brexit thickies' flavour of the month after Boris Johnson. I very much doubt he has the authority to lead the Tories considering he has never held a ministerial post. You may point out Jeremy Corbyn hasn't either but then again the rules for appointing a political leader are different as well. Would the swivel-eye grass root Tories take a chance on a man who has not yet been tested in office? Then again, has Rees-Mogg has the political ambition to become PM?
     
  17. Top_gun

    Gangster

    Joined: Jun 21, 2017

    Posts: 217

    Location: London

    Depends on your point of view. Many of the lower end bank clerks earns close to minimum wage while the top tier of management earns millions.
     
  18. Outcast

    Mobster

    Joined: Jan 25, 2008

    Posts: 2,909

    Location: Peterboro, Distro:Ubuntu

    Thickies ?
    Judge for yourself

     
  19. stewski

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 12, 2015

    Posts: 4,012

    I hope mogg ends up in charge, it's a more honest reflection of Tory policy than some speech about helping the just about managing or some big society be!
     
  20. Top_gun

    Gangster

    Joined: Jun 21, 2017

    Posts: 217

    Location: London

    The thickies refer to the large proportion of Brexit voters. Political commentators have confirmed this. Now, it doesn't mean that every single person who voted for Brexit is thick.

    I don't doubt Rees-Mogg's intellect but here is a man who supported zero hours contracts. He couldn't even organise his shotgun license renewal much less run the country. I actually support his view on tower blocks and that what people want is houses. See https://policyexchange.org.uk/publication/create-streets/

    I shall stand by what I said before. He won't be PM until he starts taking public office posts.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
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