1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

The Labour Party: Where do we go from here?

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by q974739, Nov 25, 2015.

  1. Tony Edwards

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 4, 2018

    Posts: 2,834

    Hmm and there was me thinking all Corbyn needed to do was back a second ref for the remain supporters to come back. It looks like every time Corbyn gets closer to a goal post, albeit by pressure the posts move again.
     
  2. terley

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Feb 3, 2010

    Posts: 2,421

    Probably because he is a brexiteer and agrees with those who say that it is the democratic responsibility of the government to deliver brexit.
     
  3. Dolph

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 46,821

    Location: Plymouth

    Not really, you just place far more weight on what you want to happen than what is actually happening.
     
  4. Tony Edwards

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 4, 2018

    Posts: 2,834

    No not really.
     
  5. Gigabit

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 9, 2012

    Posts: 11,776

  6. Gigabit

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 9, 2012

    Posts: 11,776

    Also not to weasel out of the poll but polls outside election periods can be fairly meaningless and also hypothetical polls can be just as meaningless.

    I'd be quite happy to see Corbyn go but my concern with that is that Labour will just return to being Tory-lite again and I really don't want that.
     
  7. RedvGreen

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 2, 2009

    Posts: 3,756

    Location: Midlands

    Then it looks like Libs are going to be the reapers of the lost Labour voters. I'm one of them.
     
  8. Tony Edwards

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 4, 2018

    Posts: 2,834

    I think that is kind of ironic given what happened in 2010 to all the Labour voters that voted Libdem. I'm was one of them. Fool me once.....

    It will be ineresting to see what happens at the next election. Will the Libdems join up with the Labour party or the Tories and the Brexit Party to gain another wiff of power and ministerial cars/jobs.

    Be careful what you wish for.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2019
  9. JeditOjanen

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 7, 2011

    Posts: 4,273

    Enjoy your CON/LD coalition where the Lib Dems make the tough decision of swinging to support No Deal Brexit in exchange for only cutting benefits by 9% instead of 10%.
     
  10. Mr Jack

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 19, 2004

    Posts: 17,005

    Location: Kiel, Germany

    Pah. Like they'd trade it for that. It'll be something like a ban on plastic straws.
     
  11. Irish_Tom

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 12,146

    I think that in 2010 Labour (and especially Gordon Brown) were seen as so toxic that the Lib Dems would have been equally pilloried (if not more so) for going into coalition with them. So they either got some power by backing the Conservatives or they declined to go into coalition with anyone.

    I have a feeling that if there was a GE tomorrow and the Lib Dems once again had to choose, they’d back Labour for similar reasons to those that led them to back the Cons in 2010.

    I’d hope they could secure a second referendum and be able to curb the worst of Corbyn’s excesses.
     
  12. RedvGreen

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 2, 2009

    Posts: 3,756

    Location: Midlands

    That is if he is still leader then. Remember there's a quite strange smear campaign by the Civil Service now ...
     
  13. TJM

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 10, 2007

    Posts: 2,217

    Those views shouldn't have made it into the media but Corbyn is overreacting. Senior civil servants assess ministers so they can serve them more effectively - a minister with a short attention span gets more meetings and visual aids than one who loves detail.

    If a potential future Prime Minister lacks the aptitude for the job or any interest in doing the hard work, the Civil Service will prepare to intensively support/handle that person. You can be sure they'll also be considering how complex and critical decisions should be made with an ultra-bluffer like Boris Johnson in charge.
     
  14. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 19,814

    What is with everyone's fascination with coalitions?

    There are other agreements available to use that don't politically destroy you for pandering.
     
  15. GAC

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 11, 2004

    Posts: 3,774

    yeah those views (if real as no sources have been named that i know of other than some random civil servant) shouldn't have ended up in the press, but it does seem to have upset the old dear. weather he has issues or not, him bleating on for an enquiry makes it look like there is something to hide.
     
  16. Dolph

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 46,821

    Location: Plymouth

    The thing is, the idea of Jeremy as an advisor puppet isn't that far removed from what many within the labour party have been saying for a while...

    Mcluskey, Murray and milne have a far greater influence than the party membership and mps, or indeed basic morality, on the party line under corbyn.
     
  17. GAC

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 11, 2004

    Posts: 3,774

    true. corybn really does love his union friends a lot more than many others within the party it seems.
     
  18. Irish_Tom

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 12,146

    True, a new Labour leader could significantly change the dynamic of a GE. If they made a clear pledge to hold a second referendum, many people who are currently considering voting for the Lib Dems may switch to Labour (or it could monumental backfire if the Labour base really does have a pro-Brexit majority).

    A coalition puts you in government with cabinet positions, the whole nine yards — something you don’t get with a confidence and supply deal.

    Also, in theory, a coalition is also more stable than a government majority propped up by a C&S deal.
     
  19. StriderX

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008

    Posts: 19,814

    Not with the level of calibre in that place it isn't, those positions come with responsibility and for the likes of a well-meaning liberal party to squander it's position again after the last time, it's incomprehensible (not to say that there aren't some good ministers, but most of them have been a explosive diarrhea mixed with thin veneers of serrated knives).

    The only serious option might be a unity government not based on party politics, but i doubt that'll happen, the LibDems should never entertain a coalition in FPTP again.
     
  20. Mr Jack

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 19, 2004

    Posts: 17,005

    Location: Kiel, Germany

    Coalitions are only politically destructive when the party entering it chooses it compromises badly and fails to communicate it's differences.