The OCUK Whisky (and Whiskey) review thread

Associate
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I've always like OP. Intrigued to try their older ones but never got round to it.
I wouldn't rush if I were you. I still have a few bottles of the 17yo that was removed from the core line, along with the 21, that everyone used to rave about and they were good whiskies, don't get me wrong, but they were nowhere near as good as the hype would lead you to believe. I'm in no hurry to open another bottle of them. Now, to be fair, I haven't tried the new bottles they replaced them with, as they are younger and significantly more expensive, so I don't have first hand knowledge of how good they are, but I think the fact that most people I know that have tried them still pine for the 17 and 21 I would expect they are not as good.

And for the guy that was looking for a smooth introductory scotch, I would say a Glengoyne 10 or 12 should fit the bill. And yes, smooth is a perfectly valid descriptor. It just tends to be used more by newbies that don't yet have the vocabulary to describe fully what they are experiencing, so some of a more snobby persuassion have a tendency to look down on people that use it. You could instead say it has little to no alcohol burn and a creamy or waxy mouth feel and they would nod along enthusiastically, where all you have really done is use more words to convey the same thing. Use whatever makes sense to you to describe them, remember it's a personal and subjective thing, and if you really get into it you'll likely pick up more of the jargon as you go anyway.
 
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More Paul John Edited last night. Might buy another bottle while still reasonably priced.
Finished on a Laphroaig 10. Can't exactly start on it can you? :rolleyes:
 
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Probably a ridiculous question to ask without knowing an individuals taste... but I'd like to buy a couple of bottles for a couple of close friends without their knowledge up front. One is a recent whisky drinker, the other is a longer term drinker. I never drink whisky.

Any recommendations for a safe bottle for the newbie and something for the other? Budget up to £50 for each
 
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Probably a ridiculous question to ask without knowing an individuals taste... but I'd like to buy a couple of bottles for a couple of close friends without their knowledge up front. One is a recent whisky drinker, the other is a longer term drinker. I never drink whisky.

Any recommendations for a safe bottle for the newbie and something for the other? Budget up to £50 for each

Nikka - From The Barrel
Kavalan - Classic
Springbank 10
Blair Athol 12
Glen Scotia Double Cask

I have avoided the strong smoky/peaty whiskies despite them being my favourite. The above are very nice straightforward whiskies (in my opinion) and are quite different to the common names you would expect.
 
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That's great, thanks. I'll get the Nikka for the whisky drinker and pick one of the others randomly for the other. The Japanese link for the former is quite fitting! :)
 
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Nikka From The Barrel is a combined malt and grain whisky, FYI.
I really enjoyed Nikka Coffey Malt - it's just their malt whisky distilled on a Coffey rather than pot still (no coffee involved...) which is the original column still (as used for lots of grain whiskies the world over, Irish whisky etc.). Extremely easy drinking for most as it's much on the sweeter side.
Bit of whisky geekiness in there, and rather tasty too.
 
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If they want Japanese then +1 to the Nokia Coffey. Delicious. I got given a sample a while back and it went down very nicely. That and a Hudson Manhattan Rye. Hmm I'm still on my buying ban which is just as well or I'd be searching out one of those!
 
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Got myself a couple of bottles of Glenfarclas 105 to last me. I was told it's ideal to add a fair bit of water. How do you drink yours?
No right and wrong. Do what you enjoy best. But obv don't waste good stuff on mixers, use cheaper blends for that eg whisky and coke etc

Personally I like mine neat and very very occasionally with a drop of water (rarely more than a drop though)
 
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I always used to prefer neat whisky, likely because I was influenced by others who looked dimly upon those adding water.
What I have found with cask strength and other stronger whiskies is that they're usually formidable to begin with. Adding water can massively change the flavour. For me it has mostly been for the best.
If you're up for some trial and error @RoboCod you could find many ways to change the flavour of your bottle of 105. Anything from a tiny drop to a few ml.
 
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Thanks for your input guys, I enjoyed my first glass with quite a few drops to stretch it out, more than I'd usually add to a 40. First impression is it's a decent daily drink! I'll enjoy this one over winter.

Its my 40th this year so I'm tempted to treat myself to the 25yo too.
 
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Just got back from a week in Scotland, the last day being on Sky. Just had to go to the Talisker distillery, in fact it was the only reason for being on Sky.
Because of the covid rules all the tasting is being done outside under a large patio umbrella. In the pouring rain and with a gale blowing we sat down to tasting 3 smooth whiskys and 3 peaty whiskys. I ended up coming away with the 15 year old special release and my nephew came away with 2 bottles of Storm.
Of course, i had to make shure the 15 had survived the journey home so i had GOOD taste last night. I can confirm it travels well :)
 
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Just got back from a week in Scotland, the last day being on Sky. Just had to go to the Talisker distillery, in fact it was the only reason for being on Sky.
Because of the covid rules all the tasting is being done outside under a large patio umbrella. In the pouring rain and with a gale blowing we sat down to tasting 3 smooth whiskys and 3 peaty whiskys. I ended up coming away with the 15 year old special release and my nephew came away with 2 bottles of Storm.
Of course, i had to make shure the 15 had survived the journey home so i had GOOD taste last night. I can confirm it travels well :)
How was it? We're visiting soon, I've never been.
 
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Sky, the distillery or just Scotland in general ?

We're heading up to Skye for a week. Been looking at the Talisker website and they're shut until further notice. Not sure I fancy an outdoor tasting session. Looking at other distilleries on the way there and back to pop in to.
 
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We're heading up to Skye for a week. Been looking at the Talisker website and they're shut until further notice. Not sure I fancy an outdoor tasting session. Looking at other distilleries on the way there and back to pop in to.

We stayed in a log cabin outside Boat of Garten, very nice it was too. I was there with my whole family.................which now is quite large............8 of us lol. The only reason myself and my nephew went to Sky was to go to the Taliskar distillery as we have done other distillery's over the years but not Talisker.
Don't be afraid of an outdoor tasting at Taliskar.................it works well even on a crap day. They are not shut by the way, they just are not doing tours because the distillery is going through an upgrade. It's still worth going to because there are some whisky's that you simply can't buy unless you are there, in other words, they are not sold through normal retail outlets.
 
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