1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Tiger Woods - car crash

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Merlin5, 23 Feb 2021.

  1. R.P.L

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 20 Mar 2012

    Posts: 2,121

    Location: London(ish)

    I don't know, but it seems completely crazy that a large number of people would do that. Having lived (and driven) in the US recently, I can also confirm that it's definitely not the case anyway. So I based my assumption on those two points.
     
  2. bainbridge

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Dec 2009

    Posts: 4,489

    Location: Bristol

    Before I learned to drive in my teens, I went go karting and went round the track with my left foot touching the brake. There was a crash up ahead, I hit the brakes to no effect and rear ended the crashed karts at full speed!
     
  3. R.P.L

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 20 Mar 2012

    Posts: 2,121

    Location: London(ish)

    Yeah, that's a well known beginner pitfall with karts. I seem to remember some hire karts having the two pedals connected so that it wasn't possible to press both at the same time for that reason.
     
  4. Maundie

    Mobster

    Joined: 20 Oct 2010

    Posts: 3,645

    Left foot braking has long been used in motorsport (I used to use it while I was doing a bit of amateur rally driving) it's so you always have power available, not sure why you'd use it on the road tbh as you don't really need to shave seconds off your best time to Tesco.
     
  5. Hotwired

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 17 Aug 2009

    Posts: 9,061

    Tailgating through town. Overtaking in town.

    Nothing but the most responsible purposes.
     
  6. Jintsay

    Gangster

    Joined: 22 Feb 2013

    Posts: 100

    I am the guy that mentioned the foot on each pedal. I meant gently resting on each pedal. Not enough to either engage the brake or the accelerator unless you push. Right foot go, left foot stop. That is the way that I have experienced some, but certainly not all people driving in the US. Purely anecdotal.

    The black box will tell the actual facts.
     
  7. MikeTimbers

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 7,876

    Location: New Eltham, London

    Given he didn't brake at all, it is suggestive that he fell asleep. Early morning trip to the course for a TV shoot in a hired car on unfamiliar roads; to me he most likely fell asleep.
     
  8. Jean-F

    Mobster

    Joined: 14 Apr 2017

    Posts: 3,309

    Location: London

    That’s a possibility, doesn’t make any difference whether you’re driving an auto or manual, you can still “zone out.”
    I remember driving a truck back from Grimsby to London in the very late fifties, maybe 1960.
    In those days there was no A1M, or even some bypasses, you drove through towns, albeit they weren’t much bigger than large villages.
    I was driving through Stamford, thinking, ‘Won’t be long, soon be going through Hatfield, then hitting the straight to get home’, then I suddenly thought, “Christ, what happened to Grantham?”
     
  9. Blackjack Davy

    Soldato

    Joined: 16 Aug 2009

    Posts: 6,005

    You havn't seen the drivers around here clearly.
     
  10. deuse

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jul 2007

    Posts: 23,847

    Location: Solihull-Florida


    Never seen anyone drive an auto with 2 feet.
    They put a foot rest away from the peddles for a reason.

    I always used just my right foot.
     
  11. 2004typer

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 9 Feb 2009

    Posts: 1,283

    Location: Up North

    Yeah - same here, right foot only.

    I've got an Auto and a Manual car - the temptation to use your left foot when you first drive the Auto is hard to overcome, and the issue is you don't have the dexterity from a pressure viewpoint with your left foot initially, so any press on the brake pedal will likely result in a full on emergency stop until you get the required muscle memory.

    When you first drive an Auto the best thing you can do is try and forget about your left foot completely.