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UK Government Performance 2019-2024

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Dirk Diggler, Dec 13, 2019.

  1. Freddie1980

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 25, 2009

    Posts: 7,015

    Location: Billericay, UK

    The changes to the immigration system is going to make it hard to recruit all those extra nurses in 5 years. From what I've read and heard a lot that 50k will be by trying to reduce the rate of attrition within the NHS.

    Full gigabit broadband? Must have been at the back of the manifesto because there wasn't much coverage about it. Fantasy world if you think everyone in the country will be able to access full gigabit internet, there's still a number of people today who only have 1mb ADSL2+ let alone modern fibre.

    Fisheries, I've said no as I think there's a good chance Boris will use it as leverage to get a better deal in our post Brexit relationship with the EU.

    The rest should be fairly easy to achieve, on the whole the Conservative manifesto was safe and not practically exciting.

    The opposition ones - The NHS sell off is a load of codswallop invented by some lefty looney trying to create a fantasy scare story out of thin air. Why would we pay more for drugs on purpose post Brexit? Makes zero sense.

    With Brexit high on the agenda and SNP conquering all North of the wall there's good change of another referendum in Scotland which could split the UK.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2019
  2. Safetytrousers

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 31, 2016

    Posts: 1,357

    Location: Moonbase Alpha

    Boris is more on course than ever to be the first person to be British PM and American President.
     
  3. Uther

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 16, 2005

    Posts: 11,101

    You'd better let Johnson know.
    I expect the Cons to do all of it, after all they have promised to. With such a trustworthy PM it shouldn't be a problem.
     
  4. StarShock

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 6, 2005

    Posts: 1,751

    I'll be very curious too see if Johnson pushes for a quick brexit. There seems no need for it now that he's got his 5 years.

    A quick dirty Brexit at this point would just mean its him firefighting all the short term problems, and he has nothing to gain from it, politically at least since the voters have already had their say. Seems like he'd be better off dragging his heals and/or moving to as easy a transition as possible.

    And hey, in 5 years he'll be able to campaign once again on being the man to get brexit done :p
     
  5. Sankari

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 29, 2007

    Posts: 24,251

    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    Because they're incompetent, and their party is divided over Brexit, just like Labour.

    Are you serious? This is one promise the Tories could easily keep if they're prepared to stay the course. The UK is a tiny little country the size of a teaspoon, you could wire up the entire place with gigabit-ready fibre in 10 years flat, and it would probably cost less than Australia has already spent on fibre to connect a country three times the size of Western Europe.
     
  6. Sankari

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 29, 2007

    Posts: 24,251

    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    Johnson does not strike me as the kind of guy who wants to string out Brexit for as long as possible. He's desperate to avoid becoming Theresa May II.
     
  7. ttaskmaster

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Sep 11, 2013

    Posts: 9,358

    So why, when the market wants us to invest more in infrastructure and we are desperately trying to invest 12 billion in that infrastucture, are the government regulator telling us we're not allowed to invest even half that amount? I mean, we're regularly criticised for making such massive profits and investing **** all, yet here we are trying to address that very thing and the government won't allow it... It's in our interests to invest, as we profit by it and it's teh only way we can deliver on all our KPIs... Oh, and there are threats of nine-figure fines if we fail to deliver despite such restrictions... So much for not forcing.

    So yes, I'm sure everything is 'voluntary'... but you make it 'mandatory'* by offering incentives that are too good to refuse, and penalties that are too crippling to incur.


    *Manda-Tory, geddit? Heh, I just spotted that!!
     
  8. FoxEye

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 17, 2006

    Posts: 22,556

    Location: Cornwall

    Industry insiders say we don't have the labour to do it. We'd need to import migrant labour from overseas in the form of engineers and construction workers.

    The irony.

    Also that the govt would need to inject somewhere between £33 billion or more; much more to hit the 5-year timetable.
     
  9. Freddie1980

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 25, 2009

    Posts: 7,015

    Location: Billericay, UK

    The promises they made that are easy to keep would be the ones on raising pensions by the greater of CPI, wage growth or 2.5% and not raising direct taxes. The problem for wiring up the UK for full fibre is there are a lot people who living in rural communities and payback cost for rolling out fibre to those villages makes it financially unviable to install in those areas. The lack of telecom engineers doesn't help either. They should have said something like 'Full gigabit broadband for 75% of the population by 2024' that would have been a lot more realisitic.
     
  10. StarShock

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 6, 2005

    Posts: 1,751

    True, he will definitely want to save face. But I don't think he's the sort to want to deal with the consequences of a disorderly brexit either. Could see him pushing his deal through. Proclaiming that we have left the EU, then prolong the negotiations as long as possible to avoid the actual fall out of leaving.

    purely conjecture on my part, but it will be interesting to see what he does. At this point part of me want to see a hard Brexit end of January and for him to have to deal with it. But hey ho
     
  11. Sankari

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 29, 2007

    Posts: 24,251

    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    Which industry insiders? How can you not have the labour to wire up a nation with fibre, when the private sector is already doing it?

    Well, that's what a points-based immigration system is for.

    Firstly, where did that figure come from? Secondly, that's a lot less than Australia has already spent. Thirdly, even if the figure is accurate, it's a bargain price to wire up a nation of 60 million.
     
  12. FoxEye

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 17, 2006

    Posts: 22,556

    Location: Cornwall

    Google, naturally. From articles written by ThinkBroadband staff, etc. It's all public domain info. The lack of labour would be if we wanted to accelerate the pace. We have labour as required for a long, protracted roll-out, and ignoring the 25% of households OpenReach et al don't want to wire up. So a lower overall target to start with.
     
  13. Sankari

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 29, 2007

    Posts: 24,251

    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    The distances involved are utterly trivial, and 'payback' is not something a government looks for when installing basic infrastructure anyway. It's like asking how much payback you'll get for installing traffic management hardware. Do street lights pay for themselves? Traffic lights? Roundabouts? Of course not.

    But they didn't even promise full gigabit broadband. They said 'full fibre and gigabit-capable broadband', i.e. fibre capable of handling that speed. They only need to deliver the infrastructure; the private sector is responsible for delivering the speed. All the government needs to do is put the wires down.
     
  14. FoxEye

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 17, 2006

    Posts: 22,556

    Location: Cornwall

    Well if it's so easily deliverable let's see Boris stick to his word. There's really no excuse then for failure, is there?

    I'll believe it when I see it.
     
  15. Syla5

    Soldato

    Joined: Feb 13, 2012

    Posts: 5,105

    50,000 more nurses, not new nurses. If they do nothing then they will not have 50k less nurses either, but the aim to retain 19k that would be lost is valid. 31k new nurses is gonna be a stretch though.
     
  16. Dirk Diggler

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 6, 2013

    Posts: 13,175

    The constituency map doesn't lie, my personal opinion is irrelevant when it comes to this. The SNP have a mandate for an independence referendum, whether the UK government decides to recognise that is another story, although I think we can guess. If we were to ignore the geographical differences throughout the UK, we would do the debate no justice.

    I think they have the opportunity to hold new ground now that it's broken, whether they put any effort into that is another story. If I was a betting man, I'd share your pessimism.
     
  17. ttaskmaster

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Sep 11, 2013

    Posts: 9,358

    Well we don't any more, as they all jumped ship to the Tory side!! :D

    Or get all those benefit scroungers up off their lazy backsides and into work, under some kind of.... I dunno what you'd call it... "Back To Work" scheme, perhaps? :p
     
  18. FoxEye

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 17, 2006

    Posts: 22,556

    Location: Cornwall

    I'm not sure that's a serious comment but, it should be noted, if the roll-out is to be complete in 5 years we need to have the workforce now. Not in 3 years when they finish their training.

    We're not talking about whether the UK will have FTTP in 50 years - we're talking about having it in 5 years, as Boris has promised.
     
  19. Uther

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 16, 2005

    Posts: 11,101

    Are there lots of engineers and construction workers currently living the high life on benefits then?
     
  20. ron3003

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 25, 2006

    Posts: 1,521

    Location: Skegness