UK Government Performance 2019-2024

Soldato
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@String

Pledge 22 The state pension will be increased by CPI measure of inflation, wage growth or 2.5% each year - whichever is the highest.

My state pension advice notice arrived today, my pension in payment is up from £168.12 to £174.62 per week. An increase of 3.87% on my calculation. I would suggest that this is compliant with the pledge.
 
Soldato
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I dont get what the big deal is with pledge 22 it was put on the books by Cameron I thought. I mean yeah its great for pensioners that they didnt reverse it but to claim it as a prize is ridiculous. There was no way on earth they would have changed it.

Its a bit like making a big deal that the tube trains are running. Or claiming they are making sure pensioners get a free TV license. Oh no I get it. Its to make it look like they are standing by their word and are decent people despite them not actually being that.

Anyway they wont have to be paying as many pensions once their plan of thinning the herd with the Corona virus happens.

https://www.moneywise.co.uk/news/2019-10-16‌‌/state-pension-will-rise-ps343-year-april-2020
The amount by which the new state pension rises is determined by the so-called state pension ‘triple lock.’

This guarantees that the state pension will rise in line with inflation, wage growth or 2.5%, whichever is highest for the September figures.

Inflation for September 2019 was today confirmed at 1.7% on the CPI measure. This means the state pension will rise in April 2020 by 3.9%, the wage growth figure for the three months to July 2019.

Steve Webb, director of policy at Royal London and former pensions minister notes that the removal of the free TV licence for many will offset these increases.

“The pension rise will be great news for those not affected by the TV licence changes.

"But there is a sting in the tail for around 1.7 million single people over 75 who will experience a squeeze in their standard of living once they have paid over £150 for a TV licence next year.

“This makes it all the more important that older pensioners check if they might be entitled to claim pension credit so that the poorest pensioners do not face this squeeze.”

The weekly increase in the new state pension amounts to £343.20 per year. However, this is reduced to around £193 when factoring in the added cost of a £150 colour TV licence over 75s will have to pay from next year.
@nkata thanks for the info, OP updated. :)
Lets get next years rise out of the way before we celebrate. Not really a pledge kept just yet as it was already set last year.
 
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Caporegime
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I dont get what the big deal is with pledge 22 it was put on the books by Cameron I thought. I mean yeah its great for pensioners that they didnt reverse it but to claim it as a prize is ridiculous. There was no way on earth they would have changed it.

May was planning on changing it, IIRC.

It's a terrible, terrible, terrible law and it should be scrapped as soon as possible, but there is little chance of that.
 
Soldato
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Yes I appreciate that but this years rise was already set last year. Thats why Im saying we should wait for next years rise to see what happens.

I've included the year/date with the recent pledges that are likely to change annually. This way we can track it over the term.

The pensioners got their rise this year, therefore it's been honoured for 2020.
 
Associate
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Yes. Thank goodness that under Johnson we're experiencing in reality the conditions Grimes and his ilk lied about us being at risk of under Corbyn.

Utterly bat**** crazy - but no doubt the target audience will swallow it.

I get the impression Grimes isn't the sharpest knife in the drawer, but he certainly appeals to the populist 'I can't be bothered thinking for myself' politics infesting the system at the moment.

Oh well, we reap what we sow and so on.
 
Soldato
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Now that we see this Government has stolen chunks of the Labour election manifesto with their latest budget, could we see another Labour policy adopted in response to Covid-19 in the shape of nationalisation of private companies who provide a public service?

I'm specifically thinking of British Airways right now. The airline industry may well collapse soon, and BA have made it clear they are in dire trouble.
 
Soldato
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Yes. Thank goodness that under Johnson we're experiencing in reality the conditions Grimes and his ilk lied about us being at risk of under Corbyn.

Utterly bat**** crazy - but no doubt the target audience will swallow it.

Young guy who works for secretly funded so-called charity.
 
Soldato
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Now that we see this Government has stolen chunks of the Labour election manifesto with their latest budget, could we see another Labour policy adopted in response to Covid-19 in the shape of nationalisation of private companies who provide a public service?

I'm specifically thinking of British Airways right now. The airline industry may well collapse soon, and BA have made it clear they are in dire trouble.

Why should the taxpayer fund them? Let the shareholders take the hit, they can do a rights issue etc
 
Soldato
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Why should the taxpayer fund them? Let the shareholders take the hit, they can do a rights issue etc

Because the tax payer will want to travel for work, holidays etc. when we come out the other end of this? You could probably include all public transport in this as surely it's only a matter of time before private bus companies etc. start to collapse.
 
Soldato
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Because the tax payer will want to travel for work, holidays etc. when we come out the other end of this? You could probably include all public transport in this as surely it's only a matter of time before private bus companies etc. start to collapse.

Is BA the only firm offering travel for work or holidays? What about Virgin etc? Fund them too? Start one and the rest will jump on the gravy train. If companies cannot ride out a short term crisis then they are poorly managed and the shareholder should take the hit not the taxpayer.
 
Soldato
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Is BA the only firm offering travel for work or holidays? What about Virgin etc? Fund them too? Start one and the rest will jump on the gravy train. If companies cannot ride out a short term crisis then they are poorly managed and the shareholder should take the hit not the taxpayer.

I'm talking about in the event that they all go under, not just BA. Even if one operator survives then we risk a monopoly. You seem to be arguing against a government bailout which isn't what I'm talking about, I'm discussing nationalisation.
 
Soldato
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I'm talking about in the event that they all go under, not just BA. Even if one operator survives then we risk a monopoly. You seem to be arguing against a government bailout which isn't what I'm talking about, I'm discussing nationalisation.

Who cares if BA goes under. Not all companies will go under as the virus will last one month in any one area. It is the usual case of trying to get taxpayers money for any problem. Nationalism in this case is simply taking the debt into public hands then no doubt, as has been shown with the train companies, when it is running well again giving it back.
 
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