What determines your nationality?

Associate
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My Dad is the same as you, moved to Germany as his Dad got posted there in the army and Gran and Grandad had him there. Imo you can't say he's German, not asif he has any German relatives even. He's got a British passport though.
 
Soldato
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If you are born in Ireland it does not make you irish, unless both your parents are directly Irish aswell.

Or so says Irish law.

In two years time I'd have lived in Ireland just as much as in South Africa, ad a few more months and I'd have lived most of my life in Ireland.

But I guess I'll still be South African even after 12 years then.
 
Soldato
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I would say your nationality is defined by your parents nationality not where you were born, as a baby you are a dependant of your parents therefore adopt their nationality.
What would happen if you were born in international waters? You would adopt your parents nationality.
Also if you were born in say Australia whilst your parents were visiting and that meant you had to adopt an Australian nationality your parents aren't legally allowed to bring you back.
 
Soldato
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I just think if your born in England your English even if you moved. If you were born in Russia and moved to America your Russian ;)

Where you were born is what nationality you are. It annoys me when people go "im part this and part this" because of my mum and my great great grandma....
 
Associate
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i) How far would you go back?
ii) Why that far?
iii) How could you tell, anyway?
iv) Have you had your DNA tested? Bet you haven't.

Besides, currently available evidence strongly indicates that all human DNA comes from sub-Saharan Africa, probably in the great rift valley, probably towards the east, probably modern day Kenya or maybe Ethiopia.

Good morning, fellow Kenyans!

Please read further than the first page.

I was wrong. Read on.
 
Associate
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I just think if your born in England your English even if you moved. If you were born in Russia and moved to America your Russian ;)

Where you were born is what nationality you are. It annoys me when people go "im part this and part this" because of my mum and my great great grandma....

what if you had English parents and were born prematurely on holiday in russia and then got straight on a plane back to England and lived there the rest of your life? you really think that you should be classified as Russian? :rolleyes:
 
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What would happen if you were born in international waters? You would adopt your parents nationality.

Ships have to be registered somewhere, for those children born in international waters (probably not many) there's a good chance they could be Antiguan or Bahamanian if they take the country the ship is registered to as their nationality. However without checking further that isn't necessarily what sets the defining law over the ship for these ships registered with a flag of convenience.
 
Soldato
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what if you had English parents and were born prematurely on holiday in russia and then got straight on a plane back to England and lived there the rest of your life? you really think that you should be classified as Russian? :rolleyes:
Well, surely you wouldn't fly if you were pregnant for one?
And there would have to be some time of limit your were parents were in the country you were born in for maybe. So stuff like holiday's don't get in the way though.
 
Associate
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i said a premature birth, anyway i'm sure you can think of lots of cases where you might be born in another country and then move on.

anyway, how long a time limit? 5 years? ten years? also by 'in the country' do you mean holding a visa or work permit or what? what about illegals, what about refugees? its a can of worms really. I think largely we should be allowed to choose our parents nationality.
 
Soldato
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i said a premature birth, anyway i'm sure you can think of lots of cases where you might be born in another country and then move on.

anyway, how long a time limit? 5 years? ten years? also by 'in the country' do you mean holding a visa or work permit or what? what about illegals, what about refugees? its a can of worms really. I think largely we should be allowed to choose our parents nationality.
Not to sure myself to be honest! Like you could of lived in England for 30years, gone to work in 'x' for say 5years you know so.

I think ill just leave it with a "i have no idea ;)"
 
Soldato
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I was reading the other day that if you are born in the USA, you are automatically entitled to USA citizenship. Seems pretty daft to me.

I was born in England, first went to school in The Netherlands, spent most of my life in Scotland. I consider myself British.

I've had friends born in the country of Germany but on British soil. Thus making them British. Is this the case with you?
 
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Associate
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I'm pretty much fed up of the 'Where are you from' questions I keep on getting, and if I reply 'Im from Bradford, in the UK, up north somewhere in Yorkshire', and then the person just stares at me with a completely confused and gobsmacked look. Some of them then proceed to ask 'No no no, where are your parents from'?

[...]

It should be legalised to be able to punch people in the gob if they ask you 'where are you from'.[...]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_culture_kid Welcome to the club ;)

Sorry for the bump but it is an interesting topic to me :)

'Nationality' is easiest defined by one's passport/citizenship. This can differ from one's place of birth. A Japanese citizen for instance -must- renounce his citizenship/passport if he decides naturalise in the UK. At that point, he is no longer considered 'Japanese' by his birth country, but he will have the rights of a citizen in this country. Whether he is considered or accepted as British the 'indigenous' is another matter, but as far as legal matters is concerned, he is British.

'Ethnicity' is the closest thing to a 'race'. This can differ from one's nationality. A kid born of Indian parents in the UK is legally British (as long as the BNP do not get their say), but ethnically Indian (or 'Asian').

'Culture' can vary from the previous two. Ideally, this is the only one that should matter outside of situations where one's legal nationality is of importance, but appearances do sometime get in the way. The problem with this as a measurement, is that someone who moved a lot may not be able to assimilate any culture fully and may not even 'feel' part of any single one.

And that's probably why many TCK get frustrated when people ask the 'Where are you from' question. If phrased as 'What's your nationality' or 'Where were you born', a straight answer can be given. It may well be that most people, by that question, mean the later (as evidenced by the number of people who think that birthplace determine nationality), but the TCK would then wonder 'Why does it matter?'. After all, the TCK may know little about his birthplace, and may be concerned that he'll be spoken to in a language he is presumed to know (e.g. A meeting between a British Chinese and a Chinese national), or associated with stereotypes.

That of course, is not always the case, it can also be an innocent question. but the TCK can never be sure.
 
Associate
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Just being a pedant here, but I've you were born in Germany and your parents were Scottish, then your nationality is either going to be German or British. You can't get a Scottish passport, yet. You can certainly think yourself as Scottish, I think myself as Cornish rather than English but at the end of the day I have a British passport so that makes me British.

Edit

I have just read the earlier post and one person even mentioned they had an English passport ffs. How dumb is that.

Can I make it clear, there maybe in peoples hearts countries call England, Scotland, Wales etc, but they don't exist officially as national states. If you have a citizenship in this country you are BRITISH. If you don't believe me, go look at your passport.
 
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Soldato
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Formally - what your passport ownership is - I'm currently a British national, if I live long enough in the States and get citizenship I will have dual nationality, it's about as simple as that.

In terms of things like heritage, length of stay, it's pretty much whatever you decide it is really. I wouldn't ever describe myself as 'half-American' for example no matter how long I'd been here but I suspect the place where you spend your formative years will have a large influence on where you attach your nationality as well as your parents background and suchlike.
 
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