What drop in speed will I get with a long cable?

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Im thinking of moving my router which will mean running a cable about 30 metres from my pc to where it will soon be.
Will I lose much speed from my 3mb connection for this length?
Any advice appreciated :)
 
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No you shouldn't do - but it is obviously better to leave the router next to the master socket and use a long ethernet cable instead :) There is no physical need to have the router in sight as you can configure it remotely of course.
 
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smoove said:
Im confused, why is the other the wrong cable?

A crossover cable is used to connect PC-to-PC that's why; although most new routers are now capable of doing a software switch of the wires to enable you to use a crossover cable for PC-to-Router IIRC.
 
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mingeroonie said:
Im thinking of moving my router which will mean running a cable about 30 metres from my pc to where it will soon be.
Will I lose much speed from my 3mb connection for this length?
Any advice appreciated :)

As already stated, use a regular ethernet cable (non-crossover).

Ethernet is good for 100+ meters, even at gigbit speeds. You won't need shielded cables unless you have a lot of electrical noise in the area, which I doubt you have! However, note that most ethernet will be 100Mbit/s, so you would need a serious problem for it to bottleneck your 3Mbit/s broadband!

My only other recommendation would be to avoid running the ethernet cable in parallel with your mains cables, but even then it will probably be robust.

Generally, ethernet is very robust!

Michael
 
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smoove said:
I'm still really confused to which cables I must be using, I bought bog standard cat5 cable of ebay and using them, how can I tell if they are cross over ones?

The easiest way is to look at the connectors at both ends, if you hold them with the wee tab pointing away from you then you should be able to see the colour of each of the cores. If both connectors have the core colours in the same order it's a straight through cable, if the order is different it's a cross over.
 
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The ethernet specifications say that a network cable should be no longer than 90m. So anything under that should make no difference at all, provided there are no other circumstances (like interference from power cables).
 
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