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What watch do you wear?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Doran, 21 Apr 2008.

  1. Richdog

    Caporegime

    Joined: 8 Sep 2005

    Posts: 26,626

    Location: Utopia

    I answered your question, just not in the way you liked/wanted, but it's patently clear that Tudor have far more heritage as a brand than Bremont. I also have no idea what the relevance of my Longines and its lack of chronometer certification has to what I posted.

    And ok, so Bremont is even younger than I thought...
     
  2. panthro

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Nov 2004

    Posts: 12,109

    Location: Wokingham

    Yes it's completely clear given Bremont is only ~11 years in the market. I totally get that you prefer Tudor for the reasons you cited, bu the issue I had is that nearly everything you wrote is either inaccurate or incomplete.
    You mentioned the in house Tudor movement kept better time than your Longines; that's a given as it's chronometer rated and the Longines isn't.
     
  3. hughtrimble

    Mobster

    Joined: 22 Jan 2014

    Posts: 3,458

    Some lovely stuff at SIHH 2018 - very partial to AP's new slim jumbo RO in ti and platinum...less enamoured by Panerai's frankly dull offerings, but more in 38mm is only a good thing to me!
     
  4. Richdog

    Caporegime

    Joined: 8 Sep 2005

    Posts: 26,626

    Location: Utopia

    Everything I wrote in my post was inaccurate or incorrect? Right.

    Lets not get petty. :)
     
  5. panthro

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Nov 2004

    Posts: 12,109

    Location: Wokingham

    Nearly everything :) anyway the Tudor is a great watch and they have a huge amount of money behind them to make it all a success, I'd love to own a blue Pelagos, but for what Bremont has achieved in a short space of time I think is commendable, and hopefully they can keep the momentum going as the UK has a lot to offer in terms of manufacturing and watchmaking.
     
  6. Sheff

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 16 Jun 2008

    Posts: 1,053

  7. mrk

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 88,947

    Location: South Coast

    This month's Gnomon mailshot contained some beautiful Seiko pieces, not cheap, but truly stunning.

    Landmaster Springdrive:
    http://www.gnomonwatches.com/landmaster-springdrive-ref-sbdb015

    Prospex 135th:
    http://www.gnomonwatches.com/prospex-1000m-hi-beat-135th-anniversary-ref-sbex005

    Marine Master 300:
    http://www.gnomonwatches.com/marine-master-professional-300m-ref-sbdx017

    I think if I ever got a Seiko diver in the future, the Marimaster would be the one to have.

    My Longines HydroConquest was +1s a day after 6 months of daily wearing. It remained that way until the day I sold it. It is to date the most accurate watch I've owned for a mere "ETA" movement. I don't really put preference to in-house movements for complexity or accuracy, just they hold value better. My NOMOS (in-house Epsilon) is around +2s a day accurate but I don't wear it every day these days so not sure exactly what it's sitting at now several months on. The Pelagos was using the same ETA base as the Longines, and that too was around +1 to +2s a day accurate.

    See the trend here? hand picked off the shelf movements can be more accurate than the average chronometer certified movement. But it shouldn't matter to most anyway as long as it's within the boundaries of COSC spec, whether it's certified or not shouldn't matter. As you'll only need to sync it up once a month anyway to be on time, as it were.
     
  8. Richdog

    Caporegime

    Joined: 8 Sep 2005

    Posts: 26,626

    Location: Utopia

    mrk it stands to reason that a certified chronometer is theoretically going to be more accurate than a Hydroconquest. It is also my direct experience with my Hydroconquest vs my Pelagos. Of course I am sure there are exceptions, but in general you can expect that behaviour.
     
  9. mrk

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 88,947

    Location: South Coast

    In theory, but not always in practice. There is a smaller margin with COSC for accuracy variation +/-, whereas with non COSC, it's not out of scope to find a piece that's accurate to say 10-15s +/- a day. But any hand picked off the shelf (ETA movement, for example) by a big name like Longines/Tudor etc is more likely to be well within COSC, and in some cases even exceed an average COSC model.

    It's not a huge deal breaker in the grand scheme of things unless you're always changing watches so want to retain maximum resale value, but even then, original Tudors running ETA movements still command strong money due to how desirable they are (example again).

    For me, I don't really care, if it looks nice and keeps good time, then it's worth a shot. The only reason I'd want maybe a newer Tudor is for the 72hr power reserve thanks to the in-house movement over the 38 of the ETA.
     
  10. Richdog

    Caporegime

    Joined: 8 Sep 2005

    Posts: 26,626

    Location: Utopia

    My Hydroconquest needs enough adjustment over my Pelagos that it annoys me, so we shall have to agree to disagree like gentlemen there.

    However the convenience of a 72 power reserve cannot be overstated... it's great and I wish I had more!
     
  11. panthro

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Nov 2004

    Posts: 12,109

    Location: Wokingham

    What do you mean by "hand picked off the shelf ETA movement"?
     
  12. mrk

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 88,947

    Location: South Coast

    There was an article/video floating round a while back not long after their re-entry into the EU/UK market showing how they go about manufacture, that the movements used are hand picked for each watch rather than off the shelf and installed without some tweaking/testing etc.
     
  13. panthro

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Nov 2004

    Posts: 12,109

    Location: Wokingham

    Without trying to sound like a know-it-all, I am almost certain that is wrong, based on the insight I have from people I know who purchase ebauches/movements directly from ETA. All ebauches and movements that are sold to external customers (outside the Swatch family) are made to order and are all subject to the same thorough manufacturing and testing standards as their internal movements. There's no such thing as off the shelf, and there is minimal finished stock holding. Also, no watchmaker will take a movement and build it into the watch without testing and regulating the movement beforehand. Happy to be corrected otherwise; there's a lot of sometimes incorrect info swimming around the internet on purchasing within the watch world.
     
  14. The_One

    Capodecina

    Joined: 27 Dec 2003

    Posts: 12,965

  15. Phate

    Caporegime

    Joined: 1 Nov 2003

    Posts: 35,682

    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    Its nice. but I can't quite get onboard with Tudors. They look so right then some parts of it look like they were designed by a 3 year old and it just throws me off!
     
  16. hughtrimble

    Mobster

    Joined: 22 Jan 2014

    Posts: 3,458

  17. The_One

    Capodecina

    Joined: 27 Dec 2003

    Posts: 12,965

    Not after one I have a LHD Pelagos ;)

    Just like look of it
     
  18. hughtrimble

    Mobster

    Joined: 22 Jan 2014

    Posts: 3,458

    No harm in having both. The colour difference more than makes up for it ;)
     
  19. danza

    Capodecina

    Joined: 28 Mar 2005

    Posts: 13,664

    Location: Drunken badger punching

    My Steinhart Ocean Black on brown leather NATO:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: 18 Jan 2018
  20. mitch212k

    Hitman

    Joined: 27 Nov 2007

    Posts: 976

    Location: Manchester

    Hi all

    I need some opinions, figured this thread was a good a place as any to ask the question.

    3 or 4 years ago I bought a Tissot PRC-200 for £199 from eBay (it was new, I think). About 2 years ago I had the battery replaced (sent off to Tissot via a high-street jewellers).

    Last week the watch stopped keeping time. The second hand was darting between two positions (back and forth). I played around with the buttons but to no avail. Later in the day the second hand stopped moving altogether. I've had quotes for fixing it of £165 directly by Tissot, or about £180 through an independent jeweller. Problem is, I only paid £199 for the watch itself, and the battery cost £60 when that was replaced. So, the question, do I pay almost the same as the watch value again to have it repaired, or just get another watch? It seems likely to me that the mechanism is borked, so it probably won't be a cheap repair. However, I'll try and get a few more quotes in to see if I can reduce the price at all.

    Advice appreciated!

    Cheers!